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eBook The Princess and the Goblin (Princess Irene, 1) download

by Ian Whitcomb,George MacDonald

eBook The Princess and the Goblin (Princess Irene, 1) download ISBN: 1400150841
Author: Ian Whitcomb,George MacDonald
Publisher: Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (May 1, 2003)
Language: English
ePub: 1579 kb
Fb2: 1975 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc azw txt mobi
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Science Fiction and Fantasy

автор: Джордж Макдональд (George MacDonald)

автор: Джордж Макдональд (George MacDonald). Читать на английском и переводить текст. The Princess and-We Shall See Who. 4. What the Nurse Thought of It. 5. The Princess Lets Well Alone. The princess, whose name was Irene, was born there, but she was sent soon after her birth, because her mother was not very strong, to be brought up by country people in a large house, half castle, half farmhouse, on the side of another mountain, about half-way between its base and its peak. The princess was a sweet little creature, and at the time my story begins was about eight years old, I think, but she got older very fast.

The Princess and the Goblin is a children's fantasy novel by George MacDonald. It was published in 1872 by Strahan & C. with black-and-white illustrations by Arthur Hughes. Strahan had published the story and illustrations as a serial in the monthly magazine Good Words for the Young, beginning November 1870.

Curdie and His Mother 24. Irene Behaves Like a Princess 25. Curdie Comes to Grief 26. The Goblin-Miners 27. The Goblins in the King's House 28. Curdie's Guide 29. Masonwork 30.

The Princess and the Goblin (original title). My family liked The Princess and the Goblin and we recommend it. This movie is refreshingly different from other animated fare, and it brought the 1872 book by George MacDonald to life. 1h 22min Animation, Adventure, Comedy 20 December 1991 (Hungary). The story is about the adventurous Princess Irene. The princess is off playing in the woods when she is attacked by goblins pets. She is saved by a mining young warrior boy named Curty.

Princess Irene and Curdie by. George MacDonald, Ian Whitcomb (Narrator). Mostly, though, this book is not Published in 1872, The Princess and the Goblin is one of the first books in the modern fantasy genre

Princess Irene and Curdie by. Young Princess Irene's belief in her great-grandmother's powers becomes essential as she and the miner Curdie work to foil the sinister Goblin plot against the king and his palace. Mostly, though, this book is not Published in 1872, The Princess and the Goblin is one of the first books in the modern fantasy genre. This book had tremendous and very visible influence on all the (now much more famous) authors that came after it. It is of course very dated.

Princess Irene's belief in her her's powers becomes essential as she and Curdie work to foil the sinister goblin plan. As the Princess tells Curdie, "Sometimes you must believe without seeing. Zasady dotyczące zamieszczania opinii.

In this sequel to The Princess and the Goblin, Curdie has returned to his life as a miner and has dismissed the supernatural .

In this sequel to The Princess and the Goblin, Curdie has returned to his life as a miner and has dismissed the supernatural happenings of the past. George MacDonald (1824–1905) was a prolific authors of both children's and adult books, including such classics as At the Back of the North Wind, The Princess and the Goblin, and Phantastes.

The princess, whose name was Irene, was born there, but she was sent soon after her birth, because her mother was not very strong, to be brought up by country people in a large house, half castle, half farmhouse, on the side of another mountain, about half-way between its base and its peak. Her face was fair and pretty, with eyes like two bits of night sky, each with a star dissolved in the blue

The Princess and Curdie. By: George MacDonald. Narrated by: Ian Whitcomb

The Princess and Curdie. Narrated by: Ian Whitcomb. Length: 6 hrs. Unabridged. In this sequel to The Princess and the Goblin, Curdie has returned to his life as a miner and has dismissed the supernatural happenings of the past, believing them to have been a dream. When Curdie callously wounds a pigeon, his conscience leads him to Princess Irene's mystical her for help. She has him plunge his hands into a pile of rose petals that burns like fire. Extraordinarily, this grants him the power to see what kind of "animal" a person is at heart.

Young Princess Irene is sent to the country to be raised in a half farmhouse, half castle located in the side of a mountain. While exploring the top of the castle, Irene becomes lost and inexplicably finds her way to a mystifying and beautiful woman spinning a thread. Princess Irene is drawn to the woman whom she discovers is her great-great grandmother. But after she returns, her nurse, Lootie, refuses to believe in the old woman's existence and the young Princess cannot find the way back to her great-great grandmother.Days later, while on an outing with Lootie, Princess Irene believes that she detects a Goblin. They meet a young miner, Curdie, who confirms her sighting. Soon Curdie discovers Goblins lurking under the castle that have constructed an evil plot against the king and his palace. Princess Irene's belief in her great-grandmother's powers becomes essential as she and Curdie work to foil the sinister Goblin plan. As the Princess tells Curdie, "Sometimes you must believe without seeing."
Comments: (7)
Gelgen
A reader can never go wrong with George MacDonald, as I discovered in childhood with my marvellous discovery of "At the Back of the North Wind." There are some similarities is "The Princess and the Goblin"....Princess Irene's great-great-etc. grandmother facilitates powers for the good, sometimes (not always) not seeming so pleasant when they occur...MacDonald brings an honest, strong theology across subtly in his works. I didn't quite love this work as much as "North Wind" as there was more violence to it....that war between humans and goblins, oh my!!!! (When you get done reading this, read "Peer Gynt" if you haven't done so already....the goblins were very reminiscent of the trolls; he even borrowed from the phrase "The Hall of the Mountain King" in one of his chapters.) That being said, the characters and emotions are real, and the imagery incredibly poetic. I do recommend this book--if you're giving it to a young person to read or reading it to them, just be aware that some of the content in the fighting scenes is a bit intense. Princess Irene is on an amazing quest to find herself, her family story and, in a sense, her spirituality...even though she never leaves the castle without her faithful nurse. Her friendship with Curdie is plainly going to be explored in further writings....I will make it a point to read "The Princess and Curdie" next. Reading George MacDonald will institute or strengthen a love of the beauty of the English language.
Ionzar
“The Princess and the Goblin” is a children’s fairy tale with valuable lessons for people of all ages. It includes numerous allusions to Christian themes, but not in an overly preachy way.

The Kindle edition does not include the beginning exchange below, and I think it is important because it helps readers understand George MacDonald’s view on Christian Universalism. Regardless of whether you agree with the author, believers of Jesus can see how we are all the daughter and sons of the King, and thus “princesses” and “princes” despite our earthly lineage.

“THERE was once a little princess who—
“But Mr. Author, why do you always write about princesses?”
“Because every little girl is a princess.”
“You will make them vain if you tell them that.”
“Not if they understand what I mean.”
“Then what do you mean?”
“What do you mean by a princess?”
“The daughter of a king.”
“Very well, then every little girl is a princess, and there would be no need to say anything about it, except that she is always in danger of forgetting her rank, and behaving as if she had grown out of the mud. I have seen little princesses behave like children of thieves and lying beggars, and that is why they need to be told they are princesses. And that is why when I tell a story of this kind, I like to tell it about a princess. Then I can say better what I mean, because I can then give her every beautiful thing I want her to have.”
“Please go on.”
Bedy
This review is for the version published by Rossignol books. While the illustrations are a touch grainy and the formatting is a bit strange, this version does contain the "Mr. Author" interruption in Chapter One that many versions omit. The font is a decent size and the paper is a thicker quality that is nice. I think it is worth the money to receive the original text, despite it being a paperback.
RuTGamer
I don't like it quite as much as The Princess and the Goblin (I'd probably rate it three and one-half stars if I could get a half-star), but it is still a very good book. I was very disappointed by the very ending, though (the ending of the main tale was wonderful, the main tale wrapped up beautifully, albeit almost exactly as I pictured so not much surprise in the book). If the last page or so was cut out, it'd be a much better story. If you read it to children, I suggest not reading the last couple of paragraphs, as I don't think they'd really understand why they were tacked on the end. Honestly, I'm not quite sure why they were myself, but I think MacDonald wanted to make an allegory out of this book (although I don't think it suits well for a children's book). The rest of the book is definitely worth reading.
Doomwarden
Thirteen year old Curdie lives with his father, Peter the miner, and his mother Joan in a cottage built on a mountain, and works with his father in the mines. After rescuing the Princess Irene from the goblins, as told in The Princess and the Goblin, Curdie has gone back to his life as a miner. However, Irene’s mysterious great-great-great-grandmother uses a wounded pigeon to bring Curdie to her so that she can send him on a mission to the King’s palace at Gwyntystorm. Irene’s father is physically ill and has fallen prey to the scheming of his sinister officials. Curdie, accompanied by a weird doglike creature called Lina who was once a human, sets off for the capital. What will he find is going on? Will he, Lina, and Irene be able to do anything that can deal with the plot against the King? How will things turn out in the end?

Most sequels are not as good as the original, but this case is an exception. Aside from a few references to drinking wine, there is really nothing objectionable. Of course, some fighting and even killing occur, but after all, this does represent the general battle between good and evil. The plot does take a little while to get moving, but overall The Princess and Curdie is a well-written fairy tale type of fantasy that can be enjoyed by young and old alike. Oddly, it is currently a bit harder to find than the first story. My only suggestion is to bypass the CreateSpace edition. It was the only one available when I went to buy the book, and there is nothing necessarily wrong with it, but it is hard to hold. Another edition that was released by Puffin Classics in 1996 and illustrated by Helen Stratton is now being offered.