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eBook Glinda of Oz download

by Layman Frank Baum

eBook Glinda of Oz download ISBN: 0554071959
Author: Layman Frank Baum
Publisher: BiblioBazaar (August 27, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 140
ePub: 1808 kb
Fb2: 1362 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: lrf azw mbr docx
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Science Fiction and Fantasy

Glinda of Oz ( Oz - 14 ) Lyman Frank Baum The Sorceress and Wizard of Oz attempt to save Princess Ozma and . This Book is one of the greatest treasures in Oz, and the Sorceress prizes it more highly than any of her magical possessions

Glinda of Oz ( Oz - 14 ) Lyman Frank Baum The Sorceress and Wizard of Oz attempt to save Princess Ozma and Dorothy from the dangers which threaten them when they try to bring peace to tw. This Book is one of the greatest treasures in Oz, and the Sorceress prizes it more highly than any of her magical possessions. That is the reason it is firmly attached to the big marble table by means of golden chains, and whenever Glinda leaves home she locks the Great Book together with five jeweled padlocks, and carries the keys safely hidden in her bosom.

Lyman Frank Baum (/bɔːm/; May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author chiefly famous for his children's books, particularly The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and its sequels

Lyman Frank Baum (/bɔːm/; May 15, 1856 – May 6, 1919) was an American author chiefly famous for his children's books, particularly The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and its sequels. He wrote 14 novels in the Oz series, plus 41 other novels, 83 short stories, over 200 poems, and at least 42 scripts. He made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and the nascent medium of film; the 1939 adaptation of the first Oz book would become a landmark of 20th-century cinema.

Glinda of Oz is the fourteenth Land of Oz book, written by L. Frank Baum and published on July 10, 1920. Best known as the author of the Wizard of Oz series, Lyman Frank Baum was born on May 15, 1856, in New York. Frank Baum and published on July 10, 1920 Читать весь отзыв. When Baum was a young man, his father, who had made a fortune in oil, gave him several theaters in New York and Pennsylvania to manage. Eventually, Baum had his first taste of success as a writer when he staged The Maid of Arran, a melodrama he had written and scored.

The final book of L. Frank Baum's original Oz series is bittersweet. Sweet because it features Glinda - so pretty in pink on the cover

The final book of L. Sweet because it features Glinda - so pretty in pink on the cover. Bitter because Baum died before it was published in 1920, and at the beginning of the tale where an endearing letter from the author would generally be there is instead a missive from the publisher. Though other Oz tales would follow, this one marks the end of Baum's original 14. It only seemed like the writer, who suffered a fatal stroke at age 62 in May 1919, would go on to write these tales forever.

The final Oz book of a famous American author Lyman Frank Baum (1856-1919) was published a year after his death. A tale of magic, and adventure, it will afford a great deal of pleasure to all fans o. .The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Like most of the. Like most of the Oz books, the plot describes a journey through some of the remoter regions of Oz, a fantasy land of four areas under the rule of one monarch. Here the Sorceress and Wizard of Oz save Princess Ozma and Dorothy, who try to restore peace between two warring tribes, Flatheads and Skeezers. The beloved children’s classic, delightful.

Glinda of Oz is the fourteenth Land of Oz book and is the last one written by the original author L. Frank Baum, although the series was continued after his death by several other authors

Glinda of Oz is the fourteenth Land of Oz book and is the last one written by the original author L. Frank Baum, although the series was continued after his death by several other authors. Dorothy and Ozma discover that a war is brewing in a distant and unexplored part of Oz, between two mysterious races, the Flatheads and the Skeezers. The girls set out to try to prevent the fighting, not knowing what dangers await them.

I wish you would," answered Ozma seriously

You can also read the full text online using our ereader. I wish you would," answered Ozma seriously. You see, Glinda, if these are Oz people they are my subjects and I cannot allow any wars or troubles in the Land I rule, if I can possibly help i. "Very well, your Majesty," said the Sorceress, "I will try to get some information to guide you. P.

Glinda of Oz is the fourteenth Land of Oz book written by children's author L. Frank Baum, published on July 10, 1920. It is the last book of the original Oz series, which was later continued by other authors.

In which are related the Exciting Experiences of Princess Ozma of Oz, and Dorothy, in their hazardous journey to the home of the Flatheads, and to the Magic Isle of the Skeezers, and how they were rescued from dire peril by the sorcery of Glinda the Good
Comments: (7)
Inth
After reading about an impending war between the Flatheads and the Skeezers in a far corner of Oz, Ozma and Dorothy head out on a journey to prevent the fighting. They discover the Flatheads are under the thumb of the Su-dic (Supreme Dictator) and the Skeezers are harshly ruled by Coo-ee-oh. Coo-ee-oh sinks her island under the lake when the Flatheads come to fight, but after she is turned into a swan, the Skeezers are stuck in their dome underwater. Glinda, along with most of the other major friends met in previous books, arrives to attempt to raise the island and save Ozma, Dorothy, and the Skeezers and restore peace to that part of Oz.

Glinda of Oz was the fourteenth and last Oz book, published after L. Frank Baum’s death. It is a bit more serious than many of the other books and certainly lacked the amusing wordplay. It was still extremely exciting and enjoyable. Having the majority of the friends make their appearances made it a lovely final installment to the series. I highly recommend it to everyone from children to adults (no need to read the other Oz books or to read them in order).
Togor
There are no pictures in this edition at all. Most, maybe all, of the original editions did have some pictures, which I would have liked to have seen. Also, as with the other free editions in this series, there are many typographical errors, mainly misspellings. There is also the occasional bit of text that's randomly bold for no apparent reason. I suspect that a printed copy of the book was scanned and run through OCR, with no follow-up accuracy check.

The story itself is pretty good. Although all of this series is clearly written for children, it's entertaining enough for adults to enjoy reading as well. But as an adult, I couldn't help but notice that many of the characters in all of these Oz stories, including the central characters, are often conceited, arrogant, and rude, yet at the same time, quite polite about it.
Burking
The final book of L. Frank Baum's original Oz series is bittersweet. Sweet because it features Glinda -- so pretty in pink on the cover. Bitter because Baum died before it was published in 1920, and at the beginning of the tale where an endearing letter from the author would generally be there is instead a missive from the publisher. Rats. Though other Oz tales would follow, this one marks the end of Baum's original 14. It only seemed like the writer, who suffered a fatal stroke at age 62 in May 1919, would go on to write these tales forever.

So the sweet sorceress of Oz comes front and center in this one, instrumental in saving the day and certainly demonstrating her value in the land of Oz. (By the way, unlike the 1939 Oz film, Glinda is the Good Witch of the South in Baum's books -- Quadling Country -- though she's never really referred to that way. Baum does not identify a witch of the North, though the wicked witches of the East and West come into play just as they did in the classic movie.)

In the action here, Princess Ozma observes, in Glinda's Great Book of Records, that there are two obscure groups of Oz inhabitants, the Skeezers and the Flatheads, who are about to go to war. Ozma decides she must journey to this far corner of her kingdom, way up on the edge of Gilliken Country, to bring these wayward subjects in line. Dorothy accompanies the fair princess, but then the two encounter great trouble. Cue the great Glinda.

Baum finishes well, though I have to wonder, because of the very slightly different flavor of this last book, if his publisher had to do a little finishing for him.
FireWater
If WIZARD is Baum's ODYSSEY, this one is his ILIAD. It's the most conflict-centered piece except RINKITINK and maybe THE LAND OF OZ.

More than most, this book has a plot which begins, develops, and concludes. More than most, it lets you watch the magicians at work together, pooling their resources to accomplish a complicated task. More than most it raises interesting long-term questions about distant local wars and the responsibilities of great powers.

It offers some of the most interesting secondary characters: not just the Su-Dic and Coo-ee-oh who are plausible, vivid personalities, but Red Reera, Ervic, the "three fishes" and even the Su-Dic's golden pig wife. All outstandingly Ozzy characters.

This book also has a more sci-fi quality to it than usual, with a deadly poison capable of inflicting major environmental damage and an island held in place by an expanding metal column. (Baum shows he's not senile, by remembering that if you lower the water level and then raise the island, it goes way above the lake's surface.) The pictures of Coo-ee-oh's hi-tech magic instruments enhance the sci-fi feel. There's also a greater sense of real danger in this book than many others. The Su-Dic and Coo-ee-oh are as serious and ruthless as any of Baum's villians and there's nothing comical about either of them except maybe the idea of canned brains, which is presented as dead serious.

Some readers complain that it's not really about Glinda. OK, but is WIZARD really about the Wizard? Is EMERALD CITY about the Emerald City AT ALL? Also, SCARECROW.

More objectionable is the inconsistancy that Dorothy was wearing the Magic Belt the whole time, and should have been able to teleport home. Plus, didn't she learn in LOST PRINCESS to make wishes on it? Baum invested way too much power in the Magic Belt from the very beginning. Lifted it from the Tarnhelm in DAS RHEINGOLD but that's another review.
Mariwyn
I hadn't read the Oz books as a child so I decided I should give them a try. I suppose, were I a child of about 7 or 8, the book might have appealed to me. However I have read many children's books and enjoyed them. I didn't really enjoy this book. I read it to read it. It seems to me that perhaps as with modern authors someone wanted motor Oz books and so the author cranked them out. I won't rate it a one star but I didn't find it that great a read either.