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eBook Hitty, Her First Hundred Years download

by Rachel Field

eBook Hitty, Her First Hundred Years download ISBN: 0440403375
Author: Rachel Field
Publisher: Yearling; Reissue edition (September 1, 1990)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1878 kb
Fb2: 1855 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf docx txt lit
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

Hitty, Her First Hundred Years is a children's novel written by Rachel Field and published in 1929. It won the Newbery Medal for excellence in American children's literature in 1930.

Hitty, Her First Hundred Years is a children's novel written by Rachel Field and published in 1929. The book is told from the point of view of an inanimate doll named Hittie (short for Mehitabel), who was constructed in the 1820s and has since traveled around the world, through many different owners.

inappropriate) adaptation, because her 1999 Rachel Field's Hitty: Her First Hundred Years just simply seems so utterly .

inappropriate) adaptation, because her 1999 Rachel Field's Hitty: Her First Hundred Years just simply seems so utterly and totally unrealistic in set-up and content, while Hitty, Her First Hundred Years at least reads and feels like potential and probable historical reality (and not some feel-good fairytale like fantasy of what modern readers might have wanted the past to be like . Hitty keeps us in touch with the timeline mainly through her wardrobe changes, along with at least one major historical event, the Civil War. Field also slips in a couple of notable writers: Charles Dickens and John Greenleaf Whittier, to anchor the date.

Rachel Field’s other books for children include Newbery Medalist Hitty, Her First Hundred Years; Calico . I have been meaning to read Hitty: Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field (illustrated wonderfully in what I assume is pen and ink by Dorothy P. Lathrop) for a rather long time.

Rachel Field’s other books for children include Newbery Medalist Hitty, Her First Hundred Years; Calico Bush; and Hepatica Hawks. Several years ago my mother bought me a reproduction Hitty doll by Robert Raikes (big deal carver of dolls and bears though he no longer seems to be making Hitty dolls).

Infobox Book name Hitty, Her First Hundred Years title orig translator image caption author Rachel Field . The narrative unfolds through the eyes of a wooden doll named Hitty. Hitty was carved in the early 19th century for a young girl from Maine.

The narrative unfolds through the eyes of a wooden doll named Hitty. The story details Hitty's adventures as she travels from owner to owner over the course of a century. She ends up living in locations as far-flung as Boston, New Orleans, India, and an island in the South Pacific.

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Winner of the newsbery medal. No one would guess that you were in my muff, Hitty," she whispered, and I could tell from the sound of her voice that I was not going to spend the rest of the morning in the pine dresser. Just then her mother came bustling in saying that they must start at once or they would be too late for the doxology.

Hitty is a doll of great charm and character. Rachel Field’s other books for children include Newbery Medalist Hitty, Her First Hundred Years; Calico Bush; and Hepatica Hawks. It is indeed a privilege to publish her memoirs, which, besides being full of the most thrilling adventures on land and sea, also reveal her delightful personality. One glance at her portrait will show that she is no ordinary doll. Hitty, or Mehitable as she was really named, was made in the early 1800s for Phoebe Preble, a little girl from Maine. Young Phoebe was very proud of her beautiful doll and took her everywhere, even on a long sailing trip in a whaler. Библиографические данные. The book details Hitty's adventures as she becomes separated from Phoebe and travels from owner to owner over the course of a century.

Hitty (Mehitabel) the refined but simple little wooden doll who describes her adventures as she passes from owner to owner in her first one hundred years. Isabella Van Rensselaer the spoiled little girl who insists on having Hitty after she finds Hitty in Miss Pinch's room; Isabella loses Hitty while being attacked by a gang of boys on New Year's Eve. Katie the poor sickly child who is given Hitty by one of Isabella's attackers; she loses Hitty in the hay during a hayride.

Hitty is a very special doll who belongs to  Phoebe. Phoebe is proud of her beautiful doll  and brings Hitty everywhere she goes. This is  thrilling for Hitty, who finds herself involved in the  most wonderful adventures both on land and at sea.  She meets many people and makes new  friends.This is the story of the first hundred years  of Hitty's life. And that's only the beginning for  a doll as special as Hitty.
Comments: (7)
Inerrace
My daughter and I read this book together and really enjoyed it. We are both fans of The Doll People book series and this book was in a similar vein, with the doll Hitty telling the story of her experiences over many decades. My only criticism is that because it was written so long ago some of the language in the book is antiquated and a bit difficult to read and for younger children to understand. We used it as a learning opportunity, so it was all good.
Slowly writer
I have been meaning to read Hitty: Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field (illustrated wonderfully in what I assume is pen and ink by Dorothy P. Lathrop) for a rather long time. Several years ago my mother bought me a reproduction Hitty doll by Robert Raikes (big deal carver of dolls and bears though he no longer seems to be making Hitty dolls).

After buying the doll, and doing a bit of research, we found an edition of Field's novel with the original 1929 text and illustrations. There is another, newer, edition with updated text by Rosemary Wells and illustrations by Susan Jeffers. The newer book came out, I believe, to celebrate the seventieth anniversary of Field's original novel. I never read this version, actually sending it back upon realizing it was an adaptation, but other reviewers' outrage at the changes suggest I was right to do so. If you haven't guessed already, Hitty fans are numerous and loyal.

Hitty, amazingly, was real. [...] is but one site dedicated to chronicling the life and history of this amazing doll. The site includes the picture of a Daguerreotype actually mentioned in the novel as well as a variety of other interesting photos and well-researched facts.

As the subtitle suggests, Hitty is already a centenarian at the start of Field's fictionalized account of her adventures. Safely ensconced in a New York antique store equipped with quill and paper, Hitty decides it is high time to begin setting her story down for posterity. What follows is a children's novel that truly deserves the Newberry Medal it received in 1930 for "the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children."

Hitty begins her life as a lucky piece of mountain-ash wood carried by an old peddler. In exchange for lodging during a particularly bad Maine winter, the Old Peddler decides to carve his piece of wood into a doll for the family's seven-year-old child, Phoebe Preble. Hitty and Phoebe have their share of adventures during their time together. More, it might be argued, than one doll could manage (including a section that reads very much like part of Moby Dick geared to a much younger audience). But, as readers realize soon enough, Hitty is no ordinary doll. As the story progresses, Hitty passes through many hands and a variety of owners. Like most things, some owners prove better than others in the same way that certain events of Hitty's life are more worthy of space in her memoirs than others.

When you realize that this book is from 1929, well before any other doll novels were published, it becomes clear that Hitty is something special because Field did it first. At first, I thought the novel might come off as dated since it was written so long ago. But I was happily proven wrong and found that the text stood up to my modern standards as well as Hitty's chemise survives her first century. Many of the insights that Hitty expresses throughout the book remain very accurate to this day. Hitty's calm demeanor and buoyant spirit also help to make this doll downright lovable.

Field's prose is wonderful. Even though I knew Hitty was safe in the antique shop, each new peril left me fearing for Hitty and in a state of suspense until I found out if she had survived. The people that Hitty passes during the course of her first century are equally well-realized in the text. In terms of classic children's literature (especially for a younger child), I can't think of many better examples.

If, you want still more Hitty, you can check out Gail Wilson's website. This very talented (and expensive) doll makers features her own version of Hitty available both ready-made and as a kit.
Xar
I ordered this book to learn what is the reason for all the doll collectors to be in such a frenzy. The book is about Hitty a wooden doll carved in the early 1800s and a recount of her owner/Mistresses over the hundred years. It is a book written by Rachel Fields and Illustrated by Dorothy Lathrop. The actual doll featured in the book is in a Eastern Doll Museum.
Written in 1929 and brought back out in 1957. It is a Newberry Award winner and based for readers 8-12 but is still an interesting book to read for all ages. Hitty has become a Doll collector's "must-Have" and many sites are on the web regarding Hitty collectors. E-Bay is full of sellers and buyers.

Hitty is created by an old Irish Peddler during a snow storm & blizzard in Maine. He carried a piece of Mountain Ash wood from Ireland to his new home in America for the wood was considered lucky. He made the doll for a girl named Phoebe Preble. Phoebe's father was a sea captain and ended up taking her and her mother on a whaling expedition. They were ship wrecked on a Southsea island where Hitty became an idol for the native islanders. Upon the family's rescue, Hitty was accidentaly lost in India and became the possession of a snake charmer, a missionary child, an artist's model, a model for a wedding dress at the Cotton Exposition, a child on a riverboat, a slave child's and finally an unclaimed box in the dead letter file. Life continues thru all the years, until she discovers that she can tell her story while staying in an antique shop.
Dddasuk
I purchased this book for my daughter to read over the summer when she finished 4th grade. It is a long book with a lot of description and was written definitely not in 'modern' style, however, it is a wonderful read. My daughter has always loved dolls and to this day (she's a teen now) we still refer back to this book when we talk about her dolls. This is a classic!
Feri
This book was one of my two favorite books when I was a child, and I wanted to introduce the delights of it to my grandchildren, so I finally purchased it. One of my granddaughters is coming over to sleep soon, so I shall introduce the book to her. It's a wonderful story about the adventures of a handmade doll and the owners she experiences. It's also a terrific history lesson without being boring. It's exciting and charming and filled with imaginative ideas.
CONVERSE
One of my favorite books. I loved having my mom read this to me as a child. I was previously only able to find this used. I purchased a used copy for my daughter and then found this when I wanted to order a copy for my niece. This copy even looks like my copy from childhood, which was already 50 years old. The dust cover is the same as my old copy. Ordered 2. Very happy with my purchase.
Folsa
(This is a review of the original Rachel Field book, not the recent rewrite by another author) Completely charming story from a handmade doll's point of view, giving children an idea of life in nineteenth century America. I recently gave this to a doll collecting adult friend who also loved it. Really an essential story for any doll fancier in my opinion. It could also be a revelation to a modern girl who grew up not even playing with dolls and who has only the modern view of old dolls as sinister fodder for horror films. What a generational change there has been! ...The original illustrations by Dorothy Lathrop perfectly capture the whimsy of the interplay between the toy which is actually only animate when played with and the keenly observing and feeling first person narrator. See also the Wikipedia article on this book.