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by Judy Alter

eBook Maggie and a Horse Named Devildust download ISBN: 0936650087
Author: Judy Alter
Publisher: Ellen C Temple Pub; First Edition edition (February 1, 1989)
Language: English
ePub: 1656 kb
Fb2: 1478 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: azw txt lit rtf
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

A novelist and author of books for both adults and young readers, Judy Alter is the author of seventitles in the Kelly O'Connell Mysteries, three in the Blue Plate Café Mysteries, and two Oak Grove Mysteries.

Amelie Robinson rated it really liked it Nov 11, 2019. A novelist and author of books for both adults and young readers, Judy Alter is the author of seventitles in the Kelly O'Connell Mysteries, three in the Blue Plate Café Mysteries, and two Oak Grove Mysteries. Her mysteries are all set in Texas.

Maggie is determined to train Devildust, herself, and has secret plans to make him much more than just a cowpony

Maggie is determined to train Devildust, herself, and has secret plans to make him much more than just a cowpony. -Judyth Rigler Lone Star Library.

uk's Judy Alter Page and shop for all Judy Alter books. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Judy Alter. Maggie and a Horse Named Devildust (Maggie and Devildust Book 1). 20 Feb 2018. 1. 8 (4 used & new offers).

Maggie and a Horse Named Devildust (ebook). In Judy Alter’s Danger Comes Home, dogs, drugs and death take Kelly on a wild ride with a runaway girl and her abused mother, a relapsed former gangsta, and a drug-dealing gang in her own neighborhood. Maggie and a Horse Named Devildust Life for most young girls on the West Texas plains at the tum-of-the- century was routine with school, household chores, and sewing instruction. But not for Maggie Lire la suite. In Judy Alter’s Danger Comes Home, dogs, drugs and death take Kelly on a wild ride with a runaway girl and her abused mother, a relapsed former gangsta, and a drug-dealing gang in her own neighborhood Lire la suite.

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Award-winning Author. CHEROKEE ROSE Men and horses-I've known a lot of both in my time, but the horses never caused. an entertaining novel with a memorable heroine and great passion for life. Men and horses-I've known a lot of both in my time, but the horses never caused me any trouble, only the men. Whether I was roping or riding or both, I could always make a horse go the way I wanted. But men, from cowboys and presidents to husbands and lovers, baffled me-and still do to this day.

Judyth Rigler Lone Star Library. Life for most young girls on the West Texas plains at the tum-of-the- century was routine with school, household chores, and sewing instruction. Much to the dismay of her parents, she loves to ride, to rope and to live the life of a cowgirl. When the gorgeous wild horse.

When the gorgeous wild horse she names Devildust comes into her life, it's love at first sight. Maggie is determined to train Devildust, herself, and has secret plans to make him much more than just a cowpony.

A Texas girl at the turn-of-the-century longs to be a cowgirl and ride in Wild West shows on her beloved horse Devildust.
Comments: (2)
Iell
Young readers who enjoyed “The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate” should take pleasure in meeting Maggie Pickett, another Texan girl of the same era (though farther west) who’s equally frustrated with the limitations placed on “young ladies.” In 1896, Maggie is 14 and lives with her parents and four-year-old brother Jed in Wise County, on “the biggest ranch in our part of north Texas, stretching into three counties and running more cattle than anyone from Wichita Falls to Amarillo,” though their house is only a dog-trot cabin. Her mother makes much of how “we were descended from genteel...folk back in Tennessee who’d lived graciously...[but] been burned out in the Civil War and...come to Texas,” where Mrs. Pickett was born and spent her childhood following a plow and hiding from Indians “just like lots of frontier women in North Central Texas.” She wants better for her daughter—a “real house,” “life in town”—and worries about her “growing up and not being ladylike.” But Maggie’s father, like Caddie Woodlawn’s, is more perceptive: he understands that to her, “riding horses makes life worthwhile. You’ve got to understand her values are different.”

When Maggie first sees the horse she names Devildust—an unbroken bronc with a coat of “midnight black that looked like it had been dusted all over with a fine layer of Red River clay”—it’s love at first sight. Reminding her father’s foreman, Wilks Benson, and his son Davey that she can “ride anything,” she gets up on the horse, “darn dress” and all—and gets thrown. But even her mother’s dismay over her “tomboy” ways, and the threat of boarding school—which her father knows she would hate, even if it was “for her own good”—doesn’t stop her. And when her mother announces that the family is moving to a new house in town, she’s horrified. The thought of “a real school” scares her, and her thoughts are overwhelmed with “visions of ladies drinking tea and sitting primly in a parlor, their hands filled with sewing.” Then her father hires a man named Dickson, whose wife Mabel was once a member of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West, and Maggie finds a friend and supporter who teaches her how to gentle Devildust into a one-girl horse. She also hears of the smaller shows, like that of Colonel Mulhall, an Oklahoma rancher whose outfit tours small carnivals and fairs. And her father insists that she be allowed to ride out to the ranch with him on Sundays after church and work with Devildust.

Maggie tries her best, but town life smothers her spirit and one of her schoolmates tries her beyond all reason until they actually get in a fight—which, of course, causes her mother to declare that she’ll go to Kansas City to Miss Porter’s School. That idea is even worse than the move, and she resolves to run away, find Colonel Mulhall, and demonstrate that she, like his daughter Lucille, the star of the show, can be a “cowgirl.” Davey, her best friend from infancy, loyally goes along as she heads up to Oklahoma on her beloved Devildust. And indeed she proves that she’s show stuff, but she also learns, from Lucille, that school may not be as bad as she fears.

Although Alter’s explanatory note—in which she says that “in late 19th-Century Texas, few ranch women rode horseback and even fewer rode astride”—resonates falsely with things I’ve read elsewhere, she paints a vivid picture of two strong, determined females, mother and daughter, each certain that her view of what Maggie most needs is the right one. And Maggie’s bond with Devildust will appeal to horse-crazy girls. This is the first in a trilogy based on historic fact and characters.
Lanionge
I liked this book it really showed Maggie's emotion to how she longed to ride Devildust and how parents really care about their kids. Even though Ms. Pickett wanted Maggie to be a lady and put her in the place of Maggie she did that because wanted the best for Maggie even though she didn't know what the best was for Maggie.