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eBook Poetry for Young People: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow download

by Frances Schoonmaker,Chad Wallace

eBook Poetry for Young People: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow download ISBN: 1402772920
Author: Frances Schoonmaker,Chad Wallace
Publisher: Sterling Children's Books; Reprint edition (April 6, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 48
ePub: 1739 kb
Fb2: 1652 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf txt lit mbr
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Literature and Fiction

Presented in picture book format, this unfocused collection of poems and extracts from this 19th-century poet .

Poetry for Young People book. I thought Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poems were creative and fun to read. Mar 04, 2018 Barbara Lovejoy rated it it was amazing. I liked how this book had 27 different poems from Longfellow; I also liked how there was an introduction of Longfellow before all the poems started.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Chad Wallace, Frances Schoonmaker. This title is aimed at children aged 8 years and upwards. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow was an American educator and poet and was one of the five Fireside Poets. This work includes a considered introduction that offers a substantial overview of the poet's life, which will help readers understand this remarkable writer.

Items related to Poetry for Young People: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Frances Schoonmaker, Chad Wallace. Published by Sterling 2010-06-15, New York :Lewes (2010). Poetry for Young People: Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. ISBN 13: 9781402772924. Children instinctively love poetry, with its appealing mixture of rhythm and rhyme. And Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, with his suspenseful narrative verse, deceptively simple structure, and powerful images of 19th-century United States, makes an especially suitable subject for the critically acclaimed Poetry for Young People series.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (February 27, 1807 – March 24, 1882) was an American poet and educator whose works include "Paul Revere's Ride", The Song of Hiawatha, and Evangeline. He was also the first American to translate Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy and was one of the Fireside Poets from New England. Longfellow was born in Portland, Maine, which was then still part of Massachusetts

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (born February 27, 1807 – died March 24. .Written at a time when he was already renowned, Longfellow showcases his brilliance and versatility in what seems a ghostly poem at first.

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (born February 27, 1807 – died March 24, 1882) was an American poet of the Romantic period. He served as a professor at Harvard University and was an adept linguist, traveling throughout Europe and immersing himself in European culture and poetry, which he emulated in his poetry. From being a cornerstone of American poetry and culture to being the most widely read poet in his lifetime, he dared to establish this very fact that Romanticism wasn’t confined to Europe (or British poets to be precise).

If this volume is indicative of the quality of the entire Poetry for Young People series, then the whole collection is worth owning.

The attempt to inspire a love of poetry in children is a noble educational pursuit, and there is perhaps no easier poet with which to start than Longfellow. Wallace illustrates with a masterful and beautiful hand in his first book, which should be the start of a promising career. If this volume is indicative of the quality of the entire Poetry for Young People series, then the whole collection is worth owning. SHARON FLESHER (March, April 1999).

book by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Children instinctively love poetry, with its appealing mixture of rhythm and rhyme. And Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, with his suspenseful narrative verse, deceptively simple structure, and powerful images of 19th-century United States, makes an especially suitable subject for the critically acclaimed Poetry for Young People series. Brilliant, specially commissioned artwork brings to life all the atmosphere, drama, and emotion of his writing including: the vital energy of "The Village Blacksmith," the urgency of "Paul Revere's Ride," and the sorrow of "The Wreck of the Hesperus." This handsome volume of Longfellow poems is now available in paperback – at a great price and with a bold new cover design – to bring the love of classic poetry to a broad new audience.
Comments: (7)
Kit
When I was producing a video biography of Longfellow for Macmillan/McGraw-Hill in 1992, I needed a one-volume selection of Longfellow's poetry, and this book did the job very nicely. It includes Longfellow's best-known poems as well as two others that were never published during the poet's lifetime but must be classed with his finest work. The introduction by Lawrence Buell provides a useful biographical sketch and a thoughtful discussion of why Longfellow--the most famous American of his time--is not more widely read today. Buell's observations may get you thinking about this schoolbook poet in a different way. I decided to reacquaint myself with Henry Wadsworth Longfellow because of a remark I read in another book. It was commented in this other reading that Henry in his day was America's most read and beloved poet and eventually supported himself on his poetry.

I truly admire any poet who has been able to make a living writing poetry. I only know of a few: Robert Service, Rod Mckuen, Rudyard Kipling, possibly Ogden Nash, John Milton - most poets had a day job. They have traditionally been school teachers or college professors, ministers and preachers.

Walt Whitman is a typical sad story of a struggling poet - so too is Edgar Allen Poe. So when I read someone who actually made a living at that art, I am curious to say the least. All else said to the contrary they must have had something.

I sent for this nice little volume. The book itself is very nice with one of those little "strings" to mark the pages - like in a bible.

I've read the entire book aloud. I enjoy reading poetry aloud. I read my poetry aloud at bed time. My wife takes out her hearing aids and is snoring while I'm inflecting and projecting to my heart's content.
This is a wonderful collection with lots of old favorites ... Paul Revere's Ride, Song of Hiawatha, The Courtship of Miles Standish, The Village Blacksmith and The Wreck of the Hesperus. But since I never sat down before and read a whole volume of Longfellow there were many that I had never read or heard. The Children's Hour is famous but I had never read it before - also The Cross of Snow - two very beautiful poems.

The fact that Longfellow was so popular back in 1888 leads me to think that Americans, on the average, must have been much more intelligent than those mulling around us today. It is a complement to the population of that era that they chose to make this man comfortable in his old age by purchasing his lovely poetry with their hard earned pennies, nickels and dimes.

Longfellow was an historian. Much of his writing is historical. He is also clearly a classical poet - writing in the tradition of Dante, Milton, Edmund Spenser and the like. His poetry is excellent. It sings. Get this volume and read it out loud to yourself (or to someone else, for that matter. It is wonderful. You don't have to understand every line - just listen to it.
He also seemed to be a very nice man - one whose life I intend to explore more deeply.
Amis
Good bio information and nice short passages of his works to teach to my 5th graders.
The Rollers of Vildar
As a lover of poetry this collection by Longfellow is great. It is a compilation of his works for every man, or every women who enjoys reading over and over again his words. I especially enjoy having it on my Kindle to read at leisure.
Zadora
Very nice collection of poems and introduction to Longfellow. History on Longfellow gives his background. Book creates interest to look for more poetry.
Buzalas
Very nice.
Jonide
The editorial reviews and reader reviews of this book do not match this book. It is NOT from a series of books for young readers!
Mavegelv
Some of the poems chosen were a bit long for young people, I thought, and some of the familiar ones from my own youth seemed to be missing.
The person who received it for Christmas has not yet let me know how she liked it.
I cannot think of a better way to introduce the poetry of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow than this small volume. The selection is excellent and of interest you the young reader. The commentary is quite relevant as are the pictures which accompany it. I find that often now, our young people go all the way through the early grades in school and many of them have never heard of Longfellow much less read his poetry. This was the sort of stuff my generation and the generation before it grew up on and cut our teeth on. I do not feel I am any worse for the wear. I am fearful that we are bringing up an entire generation (rightfully or wrong, although I feel it is the later) of young folks who will have no appreciation to this great art form and will miss a lot. This book helps. This entire series helps, as a matter of fact and I certainly recommend you add this one and the others to your library. Actually, it is rather fun reading these with the young folk and then talking about them. Not only do you get to enjoy the work your self and perhaps bring back some great memories, but you have the opportunity to interact with your child or student. It is actually rather surprising what some of the kids come up with. I read these to my grandchildren and to the kids in my classes at school. For the most part, when I really get to discussing the work with them, they enjoy it. NOTE: After reading the reviews above from School Library Journal and Kirkus review, I am not sure if they or I read the same work. I would personally recommend you rather ignore some of the negative comments. I will say though, that this is one you might want to read with your child or children though, as there are some rather archaic terms used, delightful, but archaic. Recommend this one highly.