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eBook Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story (Rise and Shine) download

by National Geographic Learning

eBook Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story (Rise and Shine) download ISBN: 1584301570
Author: National Geographic Learning
Publisher: National Geographic School Pub; 1 edition (July 13, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 32
ePub: 1867 kb
Fb2: 1440 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: docx rtf mbr lrf
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: History

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Freedom: The Sugihara Story by National Geographic Learning. Book Summary Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story 3rd Grade Unit :: Paired Text Questions: "The Holocaust" & Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story.

Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story by National Geographic Learning. Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story 3rd Grade Unit. Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story 3rd Grade Unit :: Paired Text Questions: "The Holocaust" & Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story. Skill & Strategy Units.

Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story (Rise and Shine) . National Geographi. aperback. Although Sugihara passed away in 1986, Gold was able to interview his widow as well as two people who were saved by his act. Thus, the many details of the book are authentic. Gold's biography fills in the details. She draws on interviews with Sugihara's wife and other witnesses.

Here is the authorized true story of Chiune Sugihara, the "Japanese Schindler", who saved thousands of Jews during World War II. more. Read this Book on Epic! More Like This. Popular on Epic! Book Details.

After overhearing that reading was the key to freedom, Frederick became determined to learn to read. Against all odds, he did learn and escaped from slavery. A powerful and inspirational speaker, Frederick spoke and wrote about his remarkable life and fought for the freedom and equal rights of African American men and women. Seller Inventory AAC9781575055534.

Passage to Freedom book. Passage to Freedom tells the amazing story of Chiune Sugihara, who single-handedly saved thousands of Jews from the Nazis. His story was told by his son Hiroki to the author, based on Hiroki's recollections. Hiroki was five in 1940 when his father, Chiune Sugihara, who was the Japanese consul in Lithuania, was begged by Jewish refugees fleeing the Nazi onslaught for visas to escape. The Sugiharas were stationed in Kauna/ Passage If you ever doubt your faith in mankind, this true story will restore it for you.

Born a slave, Frederick Douglass grew up facing hunger, hard work, and terrible beatings. After overhearing that reading was the key to freedom, Frederick became determined to learn to read. National Geographic School Publishing, Incorporated.

Photograph by Robbie Shone, National Geographic

Photograph by Robbie Shone, National Geographic. From its gripping first sentence, this story grabs your attention and never lets go. It's a heart-pounding adventure whose main character-a rushing flood that threatens to kill a team of cavers in a remote region in the country of Georgia-is described in terrifying detail, but fortunately the team never meets it head-on. The real privilege is being able, every day, to walk through this and each day learn something new," says Gianni Crea, head key keeper of the Vatican Museums. You’re walking through history and you read lessons that all the popes to this date have preserved.

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Against the order of his government, a Japanese diplomat in Lithuania issued thousands of visas to Jewish refugees to help them flee the Nazis during World War II.
Comments: (7)
Xig
Righteous Gentiles are recognized at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem. These heroes risked their life as well as their family's during the dark days of the Holocaust. Passage to Freedom: The Sugihara Story, is one of the few picture books that documents this part of history. The back cover highlights both Jewish and Japanese culture by citing two prominent proverbs.

The Jewish proverb- "If you save the life of one person, it is as if you saved the world entire." Japanese Proverb- "Even a Hunter cannot kill a bird that comet so him for refuge."

The book includes an afterward by the son of the hero. Reading about the positive efforts of Righteous Gentiles provides a different perspective to the Holocaust. Sugihara had to decide whether he would follow his heart or follow his government's wishes. Few Holocaust era diplomats and leaders were willing to risk their job and their family's security. This book speaks directly to the choices that all people make. Standing up for what one believes is a character trait that should not be dismissed. This story raises many important questions that can be addressed at various age levels. I recommend that Sugihara's story be included in introductory discussions of the Holocaust.
Dodo
I never knew about this man. My students wrote character traits about him and loved learning a piece of history.
Samulkree
Everyone knows about Schindler, no one knows about Mr. Sugihara. This is a wonderful story that should make the rounds. We can use more heroes, and Mr. Sugihara was most definitely a hero. The holocaust was an unspeakably terrible time in world history. Too many countries and too many people were complicit by action or inaction when Jews, Gypsies, Poles, political dissidents and homosexuals were slaughtered. The few people who followed their conscience are so amazing.
digytal soul
A fascinating story of humanism and taking a risk for others. Good lesson diversity and ethics.
Cheber
The story of Mr. Sugihara's involvement in helping Jewish people in WWII is compelling and little known. I am especially interested in the nation/people of Japan but had never heard of this historic event. After reading the book I saw the video and found it fascinating as well. The book is written in a manner especially appropriate for school age children to read of one who chose costly courage, diligence, and compassion over personal safety and promotion at a tragic time in world history. In the Sugihara story, one also sees a family involvement in difficult decision making.
Kale
Even though this is a "comic book" it tells the seemingly unknown story of Chiune Sugihara, who seemingly was a real hero for the Jewish community before World War II. As a member of Japan's consulate in Lithuania he issued thousands of travel visas for people who would have otherwise been trapped by the approaching soldiers of the third reich. Going against his government's instructions, he was able to save somewhere between 5,000 and 10,000 folks from a sure death. Why haven't we ever learned of him in History Classes? Here is a man who was able to do all of this and never fired a shot in World War II. A very worthwhile book!
Lcena
This book is an excellent way for anyone wanting a quick explanation about the Fugu plan and how one Japanese man saved thousands of Jewish lives during the Holocaust. I bought the book to read to the children in my religious school class and made sure to read it myself first, thinking also that I would buy an "adult" version of the story as well. However, the illustrations and the recounting of the events are very well done and easy to understand without being condescending. There are also additional notes at the end which are very informative.
Excellent story. I love that is shows another example of Japanese goodness in WW2, rather than the focus on Pearl Harbor that so many have. I used it with 8th graders for argument writing: Should Sugihara have helped the refugees? It also provided a forum to explain passports, embassies, diplomats, etc.