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eBook The City of Gold and Lead download

by John Christopher

eBook The City of Gold and Lead download ISBN: 0689856660
Author: John Christopher
Publisher: Simon Pulse; Reprint edition (April 1, 2003)
Language: English
ePub: 1928 kb
Fb2: 1692 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: rtf lrf azw txt
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Growing Up and Facts of Life

Six The City of Gold and Lead. Seven My Master’s Cat. Eight The Pyramid of Beauty. Writers are borrowers and thieves.

Six The City of Gold and Lead. Computer analysis has recently revealed that the best of us all, William Shakespeare, based two of his early plays on works by his then more distinguished contemporary, Christopher Marlowe. Because he was Shakespeare, his versions turned out far better than anything Marlowe could have achieved. And as Shakespeare’s genius matured, he no longer had a need to borrow; other writers borrowed from him instead. It wasn’t quite like that in my own case: I stole from a much better writer than myself.

According to The City of Gold and Lead, Masters begin to believe that humans should be capped at an earlier age "because some humans, in the year or two before . Christopher, John (2003). The City of Gold and Lead. p. 148. ISBN 0-689-85666-0.

According to The City of Gold and Lead, Masters begin to believe that humans should be capped at an earlier age "because some humans, in the year or two before they are Capped, become rebellious and act against the masters", but this cannot be done, because Capping must wait until the braincase has stopped growing.

There were eleven of us in the training cadre being prepared for the first move in the counterattack against our enemies. Some of us, one at least; must penetrate into the City of the Tripods, study them, and bring back information

There were eleven of us in the training cadre being prepared for the first move in the counterattack against our enemies. Some of us, one at least; must penetrate into the City of the Tripods, study them, and bring back information. The plan was this: the City lay to the north, in the country of the Germans. Each year some of the newly Capped were brought there to serve the Tripods.

John Christopher was the pseudonym of Samuel Youd, who was born in Lancashire, England, in 1922. He was the author of more than fifty novels and novellas, as well as numerous short stories

John Christopher was the pseudonym of Samuel Youd, who was born in Lancashire, England, in 1922. He was the author of more than fifty novels and novellas, as well as numerous short stories. His most famous books include The Death of Grass, the Tripods trilogy, The Lotus Caves, and The Guardians.

The second book of the Tripods Trilogy, The City of Gold and Lead continues the science fiction adventure that began . John Christopher set the standard for children's dystopia books with this series, and this book is no exception.

The second book of the Tripods Trilogy, The City of Gold and Lead continues the science fiction adventure that began with The White Mountains. The world has been taken over by aliens who rule in large, three-legged machines. Humans are controlled by metal caps, which are melded to their skulls at the age of 14. Will, the main character, is a young man who is part of a small group of free men, who have escaped the capping process and live secretly in the mountains. The premise of the trilogy is that humans are begin subjugated by mind control

John Christopher was the pseudonym of Samuel Youd, who was born in Lancashire, England, in 1922. The premise of the trilogy is that humans are begin subjugated by mind control. City of Gold and Lead is the second in the trilogy and takes the reader into one of the cities of the Masters. The third book, Pool of Fire brings the epic battle for freedom on earth to a close.

I even wondered if the tentacle could somehow read my thoughts: I remembered the feel of it-hard metal but weirdly resilient, pulsing with what seemed like life.

I even wondered if the tentacle could somehow read my thoughts: I remembered the feel of it-hard metal but weirdly resilient, pulsing with what seemed like life id my best to blank out what was happening. I thought instead of my home, of lazy afternoons wandering through the fields, of swimming in the river with my cousin Jack. Then the breath gasped from my body, as I was plucked up and lifted through the rain-drizzling air. Above me the door in the hemisphere was open-a mouth growing larger as I was brought toward it.

Will and his friends return to the City of the Tripods-and risk their lives-in this second book of a classic alien .

Will and his friends return to the City of the Tripods-and risk their lives-in this second book of a classic alien trilogy ideal for fans of Rick Yancey’s. Although the journey will be difficult, the real danger comes once Will is inside the city, where Tripods roam freely and humans are even more enslaved than they are on the outside. Without anyone to help him, Will must learn the secrets of the Tripods-and how to take them down-before they figure out that he’s a sp. nd he can only pretend to be brainwashed for so long.

Christopher, John, 1922-. Three boys set out on a secret mission to penetrate the City of the Tripods and learn more about these strange beings that rule the earth.

Long ago, the Tripods--huge, three-legged machines--descended upon Earth and took control. Now people unquestioningly accept the Tripods' power. They have no control over their thoughts or their lives. But for a brief time in each person's life--in childhood--he is not a slave. For Will, his time of freedom is about to end--unless he can escape to the White Mountains, where the possibility of freedom still exists. The Tripods trilogy follows the adventures of Will and his cohorts, as they try to evade the Tripods and maintian their freedom and ultimately do battle against them. The prequel, When the Tripods Came, explains how the Tripods first invaded and gained control of the planet.
Comments: (7)
Doomwarden
This review will cover the original trilogy. I read these over 40 years ago and reread them recently. I was surprised, from my perspective, how well they have held up and how much I enjoyed reading them again as an adult. They are short in length, but therefore concise, with very little that draws away from the tension of the central conflict. As an aside, the abysmal BBC series adaption is available on Youtube, and did I already say abysmal? This series merits a serious and mature adaptation to film. I am left the rare feeling of wanting more, and note that I have read the prequel as well. It's still satisfying after all of these years.
Haracetys
The second book in this trilogy finds Will, Beanpole and a boy named Fritz embarking on a dangerous journey to participate in a contest being held in a distant town. Basically it's an Olympic type of challenge where the strongest contestants win the dubious honor of serving the Masters inside their domed city.

This book is much more grim than the first. The boys are no longer on an adventure to a hazy place in the distance. Their eyes have been opened to the world as it really is and with that knowledge comes the loss of a good deal of childhood. This journey will be more harrowing than the first in many respects.

They learn harsh lessons along the way. Such as when they must learn that someone being nice it doesn't necessarily make them a friend. That they must not allow the lure of an easy life turn them aside from their goal. And, perhaps the most dispiriting lesson of all, that all too often people are perfectly willing to stay on the sidelines, believing it's best to fit in and not make waves.

One of the things I recognize and appreciate more now is the author's belief in the power inherent in children. The great thing about kids is their ability to think beyond the norm. Since they don't already think they know how things are supposed to work they naturally think outside the box and will keep at it, which leads to action. Their lack of education and experience allows them to believe that anything is possible.

Perhaps even bringing about the downfall of their alien overlords.
Grotilar
I enjoyed this, and I think the novel stands well on its own. Although this series is generally considered "juvenile" or "young adult" sci-fi, it has surprising depth and moral ambiguity about it. The heroes have flaws and sometimes do bad things for the right reasons, and other good guys turn out to be not so good at all. There is a sense of peril and forboding throughout, without much humor or levity to balance it out.

For whatever reason I was not as taken with this as I was with "White Mountains". Perhaps because I first read "White Mountains" as a young adult, so there was some nostalgia there when I re-read it as an adult. However, that novel also follows the classic motif of three young men on a long journey. This novel is something different. It has a bit of the "on the road" aspect at the beginning, but that's a minor part. The bulk of this book is set in the Masters' city. Will is much more passive in this outing, and doesn't have much choice but to persist while events unfold around him - as such there is less action. I also found "The Games" to be kind of a strange setup for the main plot of the story.

The depiction of the Masters and their city and lifestyle is quite imaginative - well, downright weird actually - and also complex with their own quirks and their own moral ambiguity. Much different than what I had expected.

Overall this was a good read, and I look forward to reading the conclusion.
Shaktizragore
John Christopher was one of the greats. The Tripod trilogy (later he wrote a prequel) begins with the White Mountains. I would suggest a reading level of about 8th grade with comprehension ability to match. Sometimes kids have trouble with the time it takes for world building. The premise of the trilogy is that humans are begin subjugated by mind control. City of Gold and Lead is the second in the trilogy and takes the reader into one of the cities of the Masters. The third book, Pool of Fire brings the epic battle for freedom on earth to a close.
Monam
I recently reread The City of Gold and Lead and enjoyed it just as much as I did when I was a middle schooler in the late 1960's. I am writing a book that incorporates events from the 1960's and 1970's, so was prompted to read many of the books that I was reading at that time. John Christopher, the author of the Tripod series of books, skillfully creates a world of repression where aliens have ruled the earth for over 100 years. In The City of Gold and Lead, the reader is shown what life is like within the alien bases here on earth, for both the aliens and their human slaves. Start by reading The White Mountains, proceed to The City of Gold and Lead, then read Pool of Fire. imaginative and thought provoking, the series will please science fiction lovers from middle school/young adult to adult. A fun summer reading diversion.
Brakree
This story had some nice touches. The boy hero of the first book (this is the second of the series) sneaks with another into the city of the Tripods. Mysteries are revealed and adventures are had.

But I had two problems with it. First, it's slow. Journeys are described in detail and the buildings and food are also explained carefully. These stretches really slow tue story down. An author once said that good stories are life with the boring parts taken out. He forgot to take out a few boring parts in this book.

The other issue was that I didn't admire or respect the main character. His laziness and selfishness aren't countered with any special redeeming features. Worst of all, a passive lead character makes for a passive story.

The underlying ideas make it good. The slow execution keeps it from being great.
spark
great book