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eBook Winter Camp download

by Kirkpatrick Hill

eBook Winter Camp download ISBN: 141696455X
Author: Kirkpatrick Hill
Publisher: Aladdin (October 3, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 192
ePub: 1832 kb
Fb2: 1327 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: doc rtf lrf mobi
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Growing Up and Facts of Life

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Eleven-year-old Toughboy and his younger sister must survive the harsh Alaskan winter at a friend's winter trapping camp.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Two orphaned siblings struggle to survive a harsh Alaskan winter looking after a badly wounded miner.

Eleven-year-old Toughboy and his younger sister must survive the harsh. After loving Bo at Ballard Creek I read the descriptions of Kirkpatrick Hill's other books and thought they all sounded kind of the same, so I didn't really look for them-but this one crossed my path and I'm so glad. This is a truly delightful story with realistic, lovable characters-two orphans and two cranky elderly people.

Winter Camp is an awesome fiction book by Kirkpatrick Hill. It is about a girl that they call Sister, and a boy called Toughboy. They live with a lady named Natasha. Natasha takes them to winter camp. Even before their lessons are complete, the children are put to the test. They meet a friend of Natasha’s.

Hill keeps up the suspense with incidents such as Sister falling through the ice, the emergency presented by a broken window in the bitter cold, and the unremitting struggle to cut enough wood for the fire. The logistics of survival as described by this Alaskan are particularly authentic; a more contemporary touch is Sister's revulsion against trapping (its cruelty is effectively dramatized when their own dog is accidentally trapped). Again, two young Athabascan Indians, Toughboy and Sister (1990), survive the rigors of the Alaskan wilderness.

Recently orphaned, Toughboy and Sister live with Natasha, an elderly, cantankerous Athabascan Indian.

Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. I read this to my six-year-old boy, who is very interested in the outdoors and nature. We both loved it; it's probably the single book I most enjoyed reading to him of the scores I have read to him over the years.

Her books Toughboy and Sister, Winter Camp, and The Year of Miss Agnes have all been immensely popular. Her fourth book, Dancing at the Odinochka, was a Junior Library Guild Selection.

Find out more about Winter Camp by Kirkpatrick Hill at Simon & Schuster. Kirkpatrick Hill lives in Fairbanks, Alaska. She was an elementary school teacher for more than thirty years, most of that time in the Alaskan "bush

Find out more about Winter Camp by Kirkpatrick Hill at Simon & Schuster. She was an elementary school teacher for more than thirty years, most of that time in the Alaskan "bush. Hill is the mother of six children and the grandmother of eight. Her three earlier books, Toughboy and Sister, Winter Camp, and The Year of Miss Agnes, have all been immensely popular. Her fourth book with McElderry Books, Dancing at the Odinochka, was a Junior Library Guild Selection. Hill's visits to a family member in jail inspired her to write Do Not Pass Go. Product Details.

Автор: Hill Kirkpatrick Название: Winter Camp Издательство: Simon & Schuster Классификация: ISBN . Описание: This book analyses video games like Grand Theft Auto and Resident Evil as aesthetic objects.

Описание: This book analyses video games like Grand Theft Auto and Resident Evil as aesthetic objects.

Two orphaned siblings struggle to survive a harsh Alaskan winter looking after a badly wounded miner, while their guardian, an old Athabascan Indian who has taught them the ways of their ancestors, searches for help.
Comments: (7)
Gholbirdred
Great Book
Arcanefist
Orphaned siblings John and Annie Laurie—better known as Toughboy and Sister—are taken in by a feisty old neighbor lady, who promptly immerses them in the lore and taboos of her now vanished Native American people. Privately scorning her countless taboos as superstitious nonsense the kids experience the challenge and real dangers of outdoor survival in Alaska’s bitter winter.

At 11 and 9 the siblings will come of age in the frigid Alaskan woods—questioning the value of Old Ways versus the advantages of more modern (1970’s) civilization. One wonders how many more years the old winter camp will have—for Natasha, herself, for that matter. But trapping for furs is in her blood and bones; she is eager to teach all she has learned from generations of Indians to these reluctant siblings. But will they ultimately appreciate her no-nonsense instruction? Or reconcile the quaint past with the fast-paced present?

With its short sentences and simple syntax this book proves interesting reading for elementary students. The hints about survival in prolonged winter wilderness provide valuable information for adults and kids alike.
Ce
I have just finished my first year teaching 4th through 6th grade students in a remote Eskimo village. Earlier in the year we had read Toughboy and Sister and toward the end of the year we finished the sequel, Winter Camp. As we read both stories I asked the students if the descriptions or events about nearby Athabascan Native Americans sounded true to them. Invariably they said, "yes."

The two novels focus on a brother and sister, known in their village as Toughboy and sister. After their Father dies they live two come to live with their Aunt Natasha. Natasha longs for the old ways and is unwilling to change. She finds the children soft and suddenly takes them out of school and flies out to cabin in the bush. The children come to admire the survival knowledge and stamina of the Aunt, but question the value of many of the old beliefs. This book explores some basic conflicts; children set against nature, and tradition versus technology.

According to the publisher's website the author, Kirkpatrick Hill, still lives in Fairbanks, Alaska. She taught elementary school in "bush" Alaska for more than thirty years.

Both Toughboy and Sister and Winter Camp are written in a limited omnipresent point of view. We frequently jump from the mind of Toughboy to his sister and back. The story is often told in narrative format and while well written is at times uneven.

Recommendation: If you are a teenage reader and want a taste of what life is still like for many in the remote parts of Alaska, I recommend both Toughboy and Sister and Winter Camp.

Kyle Pratt
Mavegelv
winter camp by kirkpatrick hill is a thrilling book that has taught me a lot about indians. i give this a three star rating because it left me with a loy of knowlege and different emotions. the company that published this book was mcmillan. i learned a lot og indian words like "huntly". there were words in the book that i would of never even guessed were real. i learned about animals and traps and survival skills. the main point of the book is when natasha toughboy and sister went to a winter camp to learn living the "hard ways". when one of natasha's friends come trouble starts... her friend is confronted by a huge moose that rams him in the ground, her friend breaks his anke. natasha leaves to get help. so it's up to toughboy and sister to do the house, cooking, hunting, and cleaning. they have late nights and early mornings. will they make it home? at leats for christmas. this is a book for all ages. i encourege everyone to read it. it's a great book!
Dori
Wintr Camp is an awesome ficton book by Kirkpatrick Hill. It is about a girl that they call Sister, and a boy named Toughboy.They live with a lady named Natasha. Natasha takes them to Winter Camp, they will stay there for a while. The log cabin is old, dusty, and the windows are cracked.So the cold air seeps through the walls.Toughboy and Sister have to do their chores everyday.One day a man named Nelson comes and gets kicked by a moose.Natasha checked to see if he was hurt, and they found out that he broke his arm. The rest of the story is about how Natasha goes to get help. I enjoyed this book because it was exciting, and it captured my attention. The theme or mesage in Winter Camp was that the old ways are good and the new ways are good too.
Sarin
I loved "Winter Camp" when I was younger. It's a great book if you're looking for adventure, and now that I'm older, I can appreciate the way it introduces kids to a different culture. Toughboy and Sister are the two main characters in the book, and they both learn lessons about who they are, how they're different from the past generations, and how it's not always bad to be able to know traditional and modern ways to do things. A great book for kids, and I'm sure adults reading it aloud can't help being entertained too.
Tam
I read this to my six-year-old boy, who is very interested in the outdoors and nature. We both loved it; it's probably the single book I most enjoyed reading to him of the scores I have read to him over the years. Although there is not a tremendous amount of action (almost the entire book centers on the group's winter campsite and two traplines), and the pacing is I think deliberately slow, it's a fascinating introduction to native American culture in Alaska from a thoroughly credible source (Kirkpatrick Hill was a teacher in the area for years) and thoroughly engrossing in detailing the small group's efforts to survive in very challenging circumstances. It's also a well-written book that packs a lot of thought and meaning into short, pithy sentences. Although it's not a fast-paced book, I recommend it highly for children who enjoy adventure, particularly in the outdoors.