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eBook Mercury download

by Hope Larson

eBook Mercury download ISBN: 1416935886
Author: Hope Larson
Publisher: Atheneum Books for Young Readers (April 6, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1486 kb
Fb2: 1298 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lit lrf mobi mbr
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Growing Up and Facts of Life

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. August 31, 5:15 PM, French Hill, Nova Scotia: A girl named Tara is running. She runs through her nice neighborhood and up a road to the burned ruins of what was once a beautiful house-her family's house.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. I had high hopes for Hope Larson as I looked for graphic novels for my grand nieces and nephews this past Christmas

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Mercury tells two tales: one of Josey, who lives in a small Canadian town in 1859; and the other of her descendant, Tara, who has returned to the same town in 2009, a year after her house burned to the ground. I had high hopes for Hope Larson as I looked for graphic novels for my grand nieces and nephews this past Christmas. To me, this was probably the best of the Larson novels I found, but I just couldn't follow the story. I'll keep it at home and see if any of the young relatives who visit like it better than I did.

In Mercury, Hope Larson weaves together history, romance, and magical realism in this graphic novel of how the past haunts a teenage girl's present. August 31, 5:15 PM, French Hill, Nova Scotia: A girl named Tara is running

In Mercury, Hope Larson weaves together history, romance, and magical realism in this graphic novel of how the past haunts a teenage girl's present. August 31, 1859, French Hill, Nova Scotia: A girl named Josey is picking blackberries with her friend Connie. As the girls gossip, a handsome stranger knocks on the door of Josey's house.

Hope Raue Larson (born 1982) is an American illustrator and cartoonist. Her main field is comic books. Larson grew up in Asheville, North Carolina, and attended Carolina Day School. Upon graduation from high school, she matriculated at Rochester Institute of Technology and then transferred to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she graduated with a BFA in 2004. She then moved to Toronto with her husband, Canadian cartoonist Bryan Lee O'Malley. In 2005, they moved to Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Город: Asheville, NCПодписчиков: 19 ты. себе: Cartoonist & writer. A WRINKLE IN TIME: THE GRAPHIC NOVEL.

Mercury by Hope Larson 9781416935889 (Paperback, 2010) Delivery UK delivery is usually within 10 to 12 working days. Read full description. Mercury by Hope Larson (Paperback, 2010). Brand new: lowest price.

Mercury by Hope Larson - August 31, 5:15 PM, French Hill, Nova Scotia: A girl named Tara is running. Get a FREE e-book by joining our mailing list today! Plus, receive recommendations for your next Book Club read.

Hope Larson is an American illustrator and comics artist. Hope Larson is the author of Salamander Dream, Gray Horses, Chiggers, and Mercury. See if your friends have read any of Hope Larson's books.

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Adjustment (Psychology), Genealogy, Cousins, Juvenile fiction, Cartoons and comics, Comic books, strips, Fiction. Atheneum Books for Young Readers. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on April 1, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

She also adapted and illustrated A Wrinkle in Time: The Graphic Novel, which spent forty-four weeks on the New York Times bestseller list and for which she won an Eisner Award. She is additionally the author and illustrator of Salamander Dream, Gray Horses, Chiggers, and Mercury, and the author of Compass South and Knife's Edge, both illustrated by Rebecca Mock. She lives in North Carolina.

August 31, 5:15 PM, French Hill, Nova Scotia: A girl named Tara is running. She runs through her nice neighborhood and up a road to the burned ruins of what was once a beautiful house--her family's house. August 31, 1859, French Hill, Nova Scotia: A girl named Josey is picking blackberries with her friend Connie. As the girls gossip, a handsome stranger knocks on the door of Josey's house. His name is Asa, and with his coming, Josey's life--and later in time, Tara's as well--is about to change forever. Because there is treasure in the woods that belong to Josey's family. Gold--an untold fortune. Asa has a secret way of finding it, and his partnership with Josey's father could make them all rich. But there is darkness in the woods, and in Asa. And in the present day, Tara, Josey's descendent, is about to discover the truth about what really happened in the family's past. Eisner award winner Hope Larson weaves together history, romance, and a touch of her trademark magical realism in this remarkable graphic novel of how the past haunts a teenage girl's present.
Comments: (7)
Ffleg
The drawing is so expressive...I think that's one of the aspects I liked most about this novel. Larson's expert illustrations really allowed me to connect with the characters and I happily rooted for Josey and Tara. I became so attached to the characters that I was quite sad when the book ended...I wanted to know more about what happened to these two young girls.

There's an element of ghosts or spirits in the book and mystical occurrences which I always find to be lots of fun. I also loved the interplay between the past and the present. The author flipped back and forth between the two stories very frequently, which normally annoys me, but worked perfectly for this book. Overall, I'd recommend this to those who like graphic novels, elements of the supernatural, and historical fiction - a quick fun read!
Windbearer
I had high hopes for Hope Larson as I looked for graphic novels for my grand nieces and nephews this past Christmas. To me, this was probably the best of the Larson novels I found, but I just couldn't follow the story. I'll keep it at home and see if any of the young relatives who visit like it better than I did.
BlackBerry
a gift i was proud to give. perfect condition, came quickly good price
Loni
About a year ago, I had the pleasure of purchasing and reading another one of Larson's graphic novels, "Gray Horses." I fell madly in love it, and this second work of art was not a disappointment. This book is intriguing, engaging, and exceptionally beautiful. I plan on re-reading it over and over again.
Hamrl
Nice to see that comics aimed at younger readers can be this good. Top notch art, compelling story and plenty of stuff for both teens and adults to like. The characters are charming, and really look forward to checking out more Hope Larsen books
Yar
Mercury is one of those stories I picked up and didn't struggle to read, but found myself constantly wishing for more. The story is OK, the characters quite sweet, and I felt satisfied with the tale, but still many nagging negatives stick in my mind.

First of all the artwork, the style is fine but I felt like there were only 1-2 templates the people were drawn from, and without powerful characterization I often found myself double checking who everyone was. Given that the story seemed to rely heavily on meaningful looks and emotional expressions this didn't gel well.

Second the story was worthy, but I felt lacked real tension. The basic premise centers around an old-timey gold-rush era family and a modern family and their various trials. On an intellectual level the tales were linked well and should have made sense, but between the complaint above and little to alert the reader which time-span you were in I often found myself having to check the characters clothing to remind myself which story I was in. The old-time family probably held more drama as we see a family react to the appearance of a charming but suspicious stranger, and I could see what the story of the modern family was portraying but I felt it was a little flat. I'll probably have to use some SPOILERS to explain so...

SPOILERS AHEAD sorry

The story is basically about a young teenage heroine, who has to live with friends(relatives) due to tough circumstances, the tension is meant to sit with her families lack of income and the likelihood of having to move to another town so her mother can work, but she is settling in 'French Hill' and even has a boyfriend (ooooo). The story is wound up when our MC magically discovered a sack of gold (which was lost/hidden in the old-timey story). Anyway my problem with all this is not so much the details (as I mentioned intellectually its a good story) its more that the narrative didn't make me feel it, most of her story-line seemed just seemed to follow a hard done by teenager, sure moving away from your boyfriend sucks but it never really felt that bad (especially compared to the historic tale)

There was an awesome blurt of supernatural towards the end, which was really cool but probably underused and not really explained (it was probably deep cultural metaphoric stuff lost on an idiot like me but whatever) but I think ultimately Mercury could have thrived better as a fleshed out novel or with more story arc.
Blackstalker
Set in Nova Scotia, this graphic novel offers a compelling split narrative united by setting and family. In 1859, Josey's family welcomes a stranger into their home who shows them that their homestead contains gold and promises them riches. In present day, Tara's old house has burned down and her family has split up. Rumors of gold will spell out tragedy for one girl, and perhaps offer salvation for another.

The contrasts between the stories, and the question of gold, gives Mercury a good amount of tension. The historical story is taut with hints of supernatural and tinged with superstition--ghosts, visions, curses. Josey is hopeful and willfully ignores the subtle warnings. Meanwhile, Tara's story plays out against a very normal, almost banal modern backdrop. She's already lost a lot of hope for the future, but she is continually drawn to the rumors of her family's past and what happened in 1859, and the necklace that unites the two stories. Larson doesn't answer all of the readers' questions about the story, but the climax certainly delivers on all that it promises. Mercury is subtly creepy and memorable.