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eBook The Storyteller's Beads download

by Michael Bryant,Jane Kurtz

eBook The Storyteller's Beads download ISBN: 0152010742
Author: Michael Bryant,Jane Kurtz
Publisher: Gulliver Books; 1st edition (April 15, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 160
ePub: 1366 kb
Fb2: 1445 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr doc lrf lrf
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Growing Up and Facts of Life

In the novel, The Storyteller's Beads by Jane Kurtz is the exact similar event that happened to the main characters Sahay and Rahel. The genre of the novel is fiction

In the novel, The Storyteller's Beads by Jane Kurtz is the exact similar event that happened to the main characters Sahay and Rahel. The genre of the novel is fiction. The setting of the story is generally Ethiopia and Sudan, in 1980, (during the political strife and famine).

The Storyteller's Beads book. Michael Bryant (Illustrator). The Storytellers Beads by Jane Kurtz (who grew up in a remote village in southwest corner of Ethiopia) is about the main characters, Sahay and Rahel that are both from Ethiopia. Rahel is an Ethiopian Jew who is also blind. Sahay is an Orthodox Christian. The story follows their journey during the harsh times (which included The Ethiopia Famine and Red Terror ) from Ethiopia to Jerusalem.

Jane Kurtz (born April 17, 1952) is an American writer of including more . The Storyteller's Beads with illustrations by Michael Bryant (juvenile novel) 1998.

Jane Kurtz (born April 17, 1952) is an American writer of including more than thirty picture books, middle-grade novels, nonfiction, ready-to-reads, and books for educators. A member of the faculty of the Vermont College of Fine Arts MFA in children's and adult literature, Kurtz is an international advocate for literacy and writing. I'm Sorry, Almira Ann with illustrations by Susan Havice (juvenile novel) 1999. Faraway Home with illustrations by E. B. Lewis (picture book) 2000.

Author: Jane Kurtz, Michael Bryant. Category: Children's Books. Download The Storyteller's Beads by Jane Kurtz, Michael Bryant free. The Storyteller's Beads by Jane Kurtz, Michael Bryant fb2 DOWNLOAD FREE.

Books related to The Storyteller's Beads. What Comes with the Dust. The Dreamer, the Schemer, and the Robe.

The Storyteller's Beads. By Michael Bryant, Jane Kurtz. Related Book Resources. A guide to introducing the class to The Storyteller's Beads, by Jane Kurtz. The Storyteller's Beads Discussion Guide.

Kurtz keeps the focus personal but never allows larger events to dissipate in this engrossing tale. map, glossary, not seen) (Fiction.

Running for their lives to escape the political upheaval in Ethiopia, two young girls from different faiths form an unlikely friendship. Running for their lives to escape the political upheaval in Ethiopia, two young girls from different faiths form an unlikely friendship.

Running for their lives to escape the political upheaval in Ethiopia, two young girls from different faiths form an unlikely friendship.
Comments: (7)
MisterQweene
This little book is so full of rich history! I cannot believe it is no longer in print! I bought a few copies, used and new , for my Ethiopian grand children. so they can have the story to treasure.
mr.Mine
Realistic fiction
Burirus
Operation Moses (1984) is a modern-day miracle.

Thousands of Ethiopian Jews hiked through the deserts of Ethiopia and Sudan to Sudanese refugee camps. They suffered from heat, malnutrition, disease, dehydration, fear of lions, and attacks by brutal militias. More than 4,000 Ethiopians died on this journey.

Those who made it were flown to Brussels and then to Israel in a series of 28 secret and dangerous airlifts, on Boeing 707s lent by a Jewish Belgian airline owner.

Sahay and Rahel are young refugee girls from two different groups who overcome their fears and prejudices to become genuine friends.

There is a map at the front of the book and glossary/notes at the back to help understand the background of the girls' journeys -- physical and emotional.
Cel
REVIEWED BY: Wayne Walker

This book is about the Ethiopian famine of the 1980s. Jane Kurtz grew up in a remote village in the southwest corner of Ethiopia, although her biography does not say whether her family's being there was as missionaries, diplomats, military, charitable, Peace Corps, or what. Until 1974, people of various ethnic and religious groups, including Orthodox, Jewish, Muslims, and native religions, generally co-existed in a somewhat uneasy peace in the East African nation of Ethiopia, which basically was favorable toward the West, although prejudice and persecution did exist, especially toward the Jews (known as Beta Israel).
However, in 1974, the last of a long line of "Christian" Ethiopian emperors, Haile Selassie, was dethroned. The military committee which removed him promised better things, but by 1977 the government had turned away from the West and begun cooperating with the Soviet Union, and, as in most places where communism has been tried, things went from bad to worse. The problems were compounded during the 1980s by a war resulting from the revolt of Eritrea, a northeastern province seeking independence supported by neighboring Somalia and Sudan, and a great draught throughout the whole region. Persecution against the Jews increased. I remember reading and seeing news reports of that time period about massive air lifts by the Israeli government of Jews from Ethiopia to Israel.
This book of children's fiction, drawn from true stories told by Beta Israel who emigrated to Jerusalem, tells about two girls, one a blind Beta Israel named Rahel and the other, Sahay, from the Christian Kemata ethnic group, who are fleeing to a refuge camp in Sudan. Becoming separated from their relatives, they must overcome the prejudices that each group has against the other and learn to help one another. While the author does not shrink from describing the horrors of their condition and the terrors of their journey, there is nothing in this book that is inappropriate for children. One thing that helps give them courage are the Old Testament stories that Rahel's grandmother has told her using the beads that she had given her. The book reinforces several positive lessons, such as learning forebearance with others, what it means to be a friend, and keeping hope alive in one's heart. Kurtz has written several factual books about Ethiopia, but this is her first novel.
Windworker
Can you imagine for someone to travel to an extended journey from Ethiopia to Jerusalem? In the novel, The Storyteller's Beads by Jane Kurtz is the exact similar event that happened to the main characters Sahay and Rahel. The genre of the novel is fiction. The setting of the story is generally Ethiopia and Sudan, in 1980, (during the political strife and famine). It illustrates that since most Ethiopian people wanted to seek for safety, they struggle to escape to Sudan. Therefore, the novel is a refugee story.
Sahay and Rahel, play a role in the most part of the plot. Sahay, a Christian girl, in the first place did not realized that life could get worth, but now, her uncle is rushing her through the night away from the only home she has ever known out of Ethiopia, forever. Blind Jewish as child, Rahel has always relied on her grandmother to guide her; however, her parents are sending her and her brother on a long petrify trip, with no assurance when. This illustrates that both of these girls' families wanted the two girls to live in a developed life in another place instead of Ethiopia. The Sudan soldiers sent Sahay's uncle and Rahel's brother back to Ethiopia from Sudan. When Sahay's and Rahel's paths join, they were both in a bad mood; but Sahay is disgusted to share food and water with Rahel. This shows that males could not go out of Ethiopia around 1980. Therefore, Sahay and Rahel are trying a superlative way to save each other; in addition, they want to attain their dream, which is going to Jerusalem.
One of Sahay and Rahel's external conflicts is that Sahay's uncle and Rahel's brother were sent back to Ethiopia. On page 120: Sahay said to Rahel, "Let's go to the edge of the camp everyday and we will try to find my uncle and your brother." This illustrates that both of the girls wished if the two men approached back to Sudan. It is because they are frightened, and they do not have anyone to support them in Sudan and help them survive the hazardous journey. Consequently, Sahay become Rahel's guide; however, they repeatedly go to the mountains to examine if the two men are circuitously.
One of Sahay's internal conflicts is to be friends with Rahel or not. On page 118: Sahay thought when she has nobody, even a blind Falasha (Ethiopian Jewish) girl is somebody, even though she does not like Falasha. This shows that Sahay felt being with Rahel is better than being with no one. This is because people in her family have always feared and hated Ethiopian Jewish. Consequently, Sahay started getting along with Rahel, to overcome their cultural prejudges and help each other.
The theme subject of the story is refugee. A quote that proves the theme is on page 143: they arrived to Jerusalem and saw them self that they had come to the land where for now, no matter what lay ahead, and no one was stranger. The authors comment about refugee is that refugees can accomplish a place that they can truly call home. The author's comment is true, because Rahel and Sahay accomplished a place that they can truly call home in Jerusalem. The Storyteller's Beads is a great book, and it would be recommend for anyone who want to determine some of the experiences that refugees go through.