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eBook Colloquial Hindi: The Complete Course for Beginners (Colloquial Series) download

by Tej K. Bhatia

eBook Colloquial Hindi: The Complete Course for Beginners (Colloquial Series) download ISBN: 0415110882
Author: Tej K. Bhatia
Publisher: Routledge (December 26, 1996)
Language: English
ePub: 1547 kb
Fb2: 1125 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lrf mobi rtf azw
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Education and Reference

For most other Colloquial courses, the vocabulary you learn in the course is somewhere around 1400-1600 words.

b. the vocabulary is a joke. For most other Colloquial courses, the vocabulary you learn in the course is somewhere around 1400-1600 words. Many courses include over 2000 words (Colloquial Italian, Icelandic, Albanian, Czech, Russian, Spanish of Latin America and probably others as well)

Apr 23, 2013 use of a number of English words, as you will see as you progress through Colloquial Tamil: The.

Colloquial Tamil: The Complete Course for Beginners. 07 MB·6,404 Downloads. Apr 23, 2013 use of a number of English words, as you will see as you progress through Colloquial Tamil: The. Colloquial Turkish : The Complete Course for Beginners. Colloquial Icelandic: The Complete Course for Beginners.

Colloquial Italian: The Complete Course for Beginners (Colloquial Series (Book Only)) by Sylvia Lymbery -How Good is Your Grammar?: 100 quiz questions - The ultimate test to bring you up to scratch by John Sutherland.

Colloquial Hindi provides a step-by-step course in Hindi as it is written and spoken today

Colloquial Hindi provides a step-by-step course in Hindi as it is written and spoken today. Colloquial Hindi provides a step-by-step course in Hindi as it is written and spoken today.

Colloquial Hindi book. Start by marking Colloquial Hindi: The Complete Course For Beginners as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Balanced, comprehensive and rewarding, Colloquial Hindi is an indispensable resource both for independent learners and students taking courses in Hindi

Colloquial Hindi is exceptional; each unit presents a wealth of grammatical points that are reinforced with a wide range of exercises for regular practice. A full answer key, a grammar summary, bilingual glossaries and English translations of dialogues can be found at the back as well as useful vocabulary lists throughout. Balanced, comprehensive and rewarding, Colloquial Hindi is an indispensable resource both for independent learners and students taking courses in Hindi.

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Author: Tej K. Bhatia. In Memory of my mother, Shrimati Krishna Wanti Bhatia, and my father, Shri Parma Nand Bhatia First published 1996 by Routledge 2 Park Square, Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4RN Simultaneously published in the USA and Canada by Routledge 270 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016 Reprinted 1999,2001,2002,2003,2004,2006.

Colloquial Hindi: The Complete Course for Beginners has been carefully developed by an experienced teacher to provide a step-by-step course to Hindi as it is written and spoken today.

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
Comments: (7)
godlike
Great book teaches Hindi with an orientation toward Delhi speech.Makes Hindi easier.It's one of the best books available and the audio part is available on-line from the publisher.
Androlhala
This is a fantastic resource. I have just received my copy and already I am in love with it. It is very well-written, and strikes a nice balance between the structure of the langauge and usability. I especially like that the author is no fan of prescriptivists, and so presents "Hindi as she is spoke". I would not say that it is "better" than Snell's TYH, but it takes a slightly different approach, and is, in my opinion a great complement to the other work.

My only gripes are the way that all the devanagari is stuck at the back (grr!) and that I had to buy the book and CD separately. Even with those minuses, it is absolutely worth it, and I would rate it a must have.
Raelin
I purchased both the book and the audio CD, and so far I've read maybe 8 or so pages, but have played the CDs quite a bit as a companion to my daily commute. Bhatia is my first exposure to Hindi langauge instruction. So far the experience has been enjoyable, though a lot of Hindi letters sound alike to my tin ear.

Compared to products I've used for other langauges (mostly Berlitz tapes), the Hindi CD is a vast improvement, moving beyond "set piece conversation" into more general usage.

Obviously, I'm not in a position to critique Bhatia's style of instruction or other technical details.

The CDs I received are "burned" (CD-Rs) with one-color silk screening, and not pressed. That's OK, but for extra safety, ripping a copy for general use is recommended. Keeping CD-Rs in hot cars is an express ticket to data oblivion.

My only minor gripe is that I wish that those who write about Hindi or Indian culture would stop apologizing for India's social problems. Remember, the USA broke away from Great Britain in 1776 with a population of about 3 million. India started her own path in 1947 with a population hundreds of times greater. It took the USA roughly 70-80 years to achieve social and economic milestones comparable to Europe. So just chill and remember that respect comes to those with lots of money and power (such as one gains by splitting the atom.)
Dammy
I have had this book and its cassette and CD counterparts for several years, but misplaced the cassettes, which I use in the car. I have been self-studying Hindi for four years, and deeply enjoy doing so as I drive about doing the day's errands. I am delighted to be able to do so again! This approach to the language has been extremely useful, helpful and a great deal of fun.
Feri
Bohut acche! Tej K. Bhatia's book is an outstanding, gentle, yet comprehensive introduction to the Hindi language for a beginner. It's difficult to cite the numerous reasons why this book is so valuable for the apprehensive beginning language-learner, but I'll make an attempt to summarize the high points:

(1) Bhatia is careful not to overwhelm the beginning learner with the complexities of the Devanagari script too early. He has the perfect instructor's touch here, rendering most of the early dialogues in Roman characters while gradually easing the learner into Devanagari as he/she gains more confidence in the basics of speaking and comprehending.

(2) Bhatia's book has just enough grammar to give any Hindi learner a handy mental framework for organizing the rules of sentence construction, without being too intimidating. Happily, Hindi grammar resembles that of Mandarin Chinese in some respects, though not quite as simple as Mandarin-- it's fairly consistent, broad-brushed enough to allow sophisticated emotional and logical expression yet accessible enough that even beginning students can basically vocalize their thoughts after just a couple weeks of study. Bhatia does a fine job of really organizing this grammar in the right sequence, explaining the niceties of Hindi syntax while taking some of the language's trickier aspects (e.g. postpositions, as in Japanese, participles, causatives, the oblique) and making them seem eminently manageable.

(3) Pronunciation, often neglected in self-teaching language books, gets more than a cursory treatment here, an asset not to be downplayed!

(4) The tape/CDs have a wealth of spoken material and can be conveniently played at home, on the road or on the plane or train or bus.

(5) Bhatia's book, as the series title suggests, really focuses on Hindi as a colloquial idiom. While this may at first seem trivial, it's a very important asset to his book! In India, there are in effect two forms of Hindi-- the formalized literary version used in ceremonial and official circumstances, and the popular "Bollywood" Hindi that's used on the street and in the markets throughout India and, indeed, much of the world (including in quite a few South Asian shops in New York City, where this "common Hindi" is a sort of lingua franca). It's this colloquial Hindi (very closely resembling Urdu), essentially, that's so rapidly become a world language and taken much of the world by storm as Bollywood movies and music, among other Indian exports, become so popular.

In practice, this "colloquial Hindi" isn't even entirely Hindi, but a hybrid spoken tongue with a Hindi foundation plus plenty of contributions from Malayalam, Marathi, Gujarati, Tamil, Telugu, Bengali, and other Indian as well as European languages tossed in to spice the mix, popular throughout the Subcontinent in its varieties. While Bhatia doesn't delve too much into the varied vocabulary of this "dialectical Hindi(ish)" language, his dialogues and idiomatic expressions do a fine job of conveying true conversational Hindi to the learner and thus providing a nice basis for communicating in the popular Hindi that's actually used between native speakers.

In its dialectical varieties, Hindi-Urdu has close to a billion speakers worldwide, may soon become a UN official language and-- along with Spanish and Mandarin Chinese-- may well be one of the "essential languages" of the 21st century as India continues its ascent. Moreover, since Hindi is a fellow Indo-European language, it has enough similarities to intrigue and delight a native European-language speaker and smooth the learning process. In fact, if you've already learned an important European language like French, German or Spanish-- or Farsi Persian or Dari, which Hindi-Urdu in many ways resembles-- you'll have a headstart in mastering the quirks and structures of Hindi, especially as Bhatia presents it.

Besides which, Hindi is a beautiful and poetic language that sings as much as it speaks, equally at home conveying complicated scientific concepts as in expressing the deepest emotions of the heart. Bhatia is an experienced and talented teacher of this wonderful language, and after just a couple months of studying you'll find yourself able to communicate at a decent level, maybe even humming some Hindi music during your lunch break.
Virn
An excellent book for beginners, like the title implies, it is mainly a course in Colloqial Hindi, and almost omits the Devanagari syllbary entirely. There is only one chapter on it, but that chapter is very helpful all the same. The tape that comes with the book is a necessary element; it is integrated with the exercises in the book quite nicely, so make sure you get the cassette as well. The romanisation scheme is weird, but it's not too difficult. As an introduction to spoken Hindi, this can't be beat. For a better knowledge of the Devanagari syllabary, I would recommend Snell's "Teach Yourself Hindi".
Went Tyu
I felt Colloquial Hindi was like teacher inside a book teaching me. I learned so much about the Indian culture, food, and Hindi. For example, I never new the swastika was the Indian sign of hope and prosperity. Not only did this book teach me Hindi quite thoroughly, but the culture as. It was like going to India and learning Hindi there!
I found it clear, gradual and (most over all) aware of the non-linguistic rules related to conversation. I disagree with the "London reader": I found the romanization good and easy to follow... maybe it's 'cause I'm italian or 'cause I was teaching myself Hindi just for pleasure, so I wasn't expecting nothing more than an aid!