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eBook Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (Illustrated Facsimile of the Original Editions) (Engage Books) download

by Lewis Carroll,Sir John Tenniel

eBook Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass (Illustrated Facsimile of the Original Editions) (Engage Books) download ISBN: 1926606310
Author: Lewis Carroll,Sir John Tenniel
Publisher: Engage Books (March 1, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 450
ePub: 1621 kb
Fb2: 1312 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi azw docx doc
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Classics

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" was first published in 1865 and relates the events that take place after . The second of the two books, "Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There," appeared in 1871 and is very similar in nature to the first, though having a slightly different plot.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" was first published in 1865 and relates the events that take place after young Alice falls asleep during her lessons and dreams of following a white rabbit down a rabbit hole. Alice encounters all manner of strange creatures in her dream, and finds herself in all sorts of curious predicaments where common sense fails and the nonsensical comes to be expected.

Naturally, the tale of Alice in Wonderland (told in two books; Alice's . The book has two stories Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass

The book has two stories Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. I have read the first many years back but it is the first time I read the second one.

The equally popular sequel Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, was published in 1872. The Alice books are but one example of his wide ranging authorship. The Hunting of the Snark, a classic nonsense epic (1876) and Euclid and His Modern Rivals, a rare example of humorous work concerning mathematics, still entice and intrigue today's students

Carroll's unique play on logic has undoubtedly led to his stories lasting appeal with adults, while remaining two of the most beloved children's tales of all time. Похожие книги: Alice's Adventures In Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass.

Wonderland, and Through the Looking-Glass, Inspired by Alice's Adventures i. 1865 Tenniel finishes the illustrations and the Clarendon Press prints 2,000 copies of the book as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland

1865 Tenniel finishes the illustrations and the Clarendon Press prints 2,000 copies of the book as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Despite the book's great success, Carroll prefers to stay out of the public eye. 1869 Long fascinated by occultism, Carroll introduces ghosts into his work with the publication of Phantasmagoria and Other Poems.

Lewis Carroll, Sir John Tenniel. Journey with Alice down the rabbit hole into a world of wonder where oddities, logic and wordplay rule supreme. Encounter characters like the grinning Cheshire Cat who can vanish into thin air, the cryptic Mad Hatter. Encounter characters like the grinning Cheshire Cat who can vanish into thin air, the cryptic Mad Hatter who speaks in riddles and the harrowing Queen of Hearts obsessed with the phrase "Off with their heads!". Amidst these absurdities, Alice will.

Book cover Alice in Wonderland. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll, 1983, Purnell Books, Colour and Line Drawn Illustrations

Book cover Alice in Wonderland. There are various covers for this story; this one has a delicate illustration with gold, red and white roses. There have been so many pretty book covers for Alice over the years. I like this one with the white-painted-red roses. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through The Looking Glass by Lewis Carroll, 1983, Purnell Books, Colour and Line Drawn Illustrations. Line Drawing Through The Looking Glass Adventures In Wonderland Lewis Carroll Vintage Book Covers Alice Etsy Shop Drawings Color.

Carroll's unique play on logic has undoubtedly led to his stories lasting appeal with adults, while remaining two of the most beloved children's tales of all time. Seller Inventory AAV9781926606316. More information about this seller Contact this seller 3. Stock Image. Читать дальш. мотрите также.

Alice (Alice's Adventures in Wonderland). Alice is a fictional character and protagonist of Lewis Carroll's children's novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (1865) and its sequel, Through the Looking-Glass (1871). A child in the mid-Victorian era, Alice unintentionally goes on an underground adventure after accidentally falling down a rabbit hole into Wonderland; in the sequel, she steps through a mirror into an alternative world.

Journey with Alice down the rabbit hole into a world of wonder where oddities, logic and wordplay rule supreme. Encounter characters like the grinning Cheshire Cat who can vanish into thin air, the cryptic Mad Hatter who speaks in riddles and the harrowing Queen of Hearts obsessed with the phrase "Off with their heads!" This is a land where rules have no boundaries, eating mushrooms will make you grow or shrink, croquet is played with flamingos and hedgehogs, and exorbitant trials are held for the theft of tarts. Amidst these absurdities, Alice will have to find her own way home. This edition includes the 1866 facsimile of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and the 1871 facsimile of Through the Looking-Glass, preserved in their original form. Carroll's unique play on logic has undoubtedly led to his stories lasting appeal with adults, while remaining two of the most beloved children's tales of all time. This edition is complete with all 92 original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel.
Comments: (4)
DarK-LiGht
These two classic nineteenth century childrens' books are presented here in a facsimile edition that reproduces all of the original illustrations by Sir John Tenniel. If you want to read this work as children and adults experienced it as published this is the only facsimile edition currently available. On this 150th anniversary of the first book, this is a great way to re-read it.
Peras
Wonderful replica of the original. Purchased for my 12 yod who completely enjoys the illustrations.
Truthcliff
My first exposure to Lewis Carroll's classic children's story was through the 1951 Disney film adaptation "Alice in Wonderland," which I watched repeatedly as a child. The creative quality of the story never failed to fascinate me, and I kept going back despite my deep-rooted terror of the frightful Queen of Hearts, who always gave me nightmares! However, it was not until recently, as an adult, that I ever picked up the book/s upon which that film was based. In some ways I wish I had read it when I was younger, as the book certainly makes a great deal more sense than the movie does (as much sense as a story of this sort can, anyhow), but thankfully this book is unique in that it is just as enjoyable for adults as for children.

The story is actually spread across two books, here contained in a single volume. "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" was first published in 1865 and relates the events that take place after young Alice falls asleep during her lessons and dreams of following a white rabbit down a rabbit hole. Alice encounters all manner of strange creatures in her dream, and finds herself in all sorts of curious predicaments where common sense fails and the nonsensical comes to be expected. There is no central, concrete storyline, but rather Alice moves rapidly from one bizarre situation to the next before waking once more and relating the whole adventure to her sister.

The second of the two books, "Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There," appeared in 1871 and is very similar in nature to the first, though having a slightly different plot. Here Alice steps through an ordinary looking-glass one day, only to find herself in a world where, if you wish to get anywhere, you must walk in the opposite direction! Walking toward your desired destination only gets you further and further away. Also, interestingly, the land which Alice has entered is essentially a giant chessboard, and she must move through the different squares to reach the other side if she wishes to become a queen (which she does).

The characters Carroll created in these two stories are some of the most strikingly unique and unforgettable in the world of literature. Alice herself, based largely on Alice Liddell, a real-life child of whom Carroll was very fond, is a wonderful heroine that you can't help admiring. Throughout all of her backwards and upside-down adventures, she remains ever sensible and analytical, always trying to reason her way out of the most unreasonable situations. Other characters a reader won't soon forget include the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter, the March Hare, the Dormouse, the Cheshire Cat, Bill the Lizard, the Caterpillar, the Duchess and her peppery cook, the aforementioned Queen of Hearts, the Mock Turtle, the Gryphon, the Red and White Queens, the talking flowers, Tweedledum and Tweedledee, the Sheep, Humpty Dumpty, and the Red and White Knights. Carroll also created many fascinating new creatures in his stories, including bread-and-butterflies, rocking-horseflies, "slithy toves," "mome raths" and more.

What I find most intriguing, as an adult reader of these books, is Carroll's brilliant use of wordplay and symbolism throughout the stories. Nearly everything has some sort of double meaning. There are hidden messags and subtle witticisms on every page. Carroll also includes several parodies of what were well-known songs and rhymes in England at the time. Young children will love the books for their fantastic qualities and imaginative inspiration, but most readers will not pick up on the many puns and jokes until they are a little older, so these stories really do have something to offer to anyone, no matter what age. I'd highly recommend the book to any reader - and be sure to get an edition that includes the original illustrations.
Cordantrius
My first exposure to Lewis Carroll's classic children's story was through the 1951 Disney film adaptation "Alice in Wonderland," which I watched repeatedly as a child. The creative quality of the story never failed to fascinate me, and I kept going back despite my deep-rooted terror of the frightful Queen of Hearts, who always gave me nightmares! However, it was not until recently, as an adult, that I ever picked up the book/s upon which that film was based. In some ways I wish I had read it when I was younger, as the book certainly makes a great deal more sense than the movie does (as much sense as a story of this sort can, anyhow), but thankfully this book is unique in that it is just as enjoyable for adults as for children.

The story is actually spread across two books, here contained in a single volume. "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" was first published in 1865 and relates the events that take place after young Alice falls asleep during her lessons and dreams of following a white rabbit down a rabbit hole. Alice encounters all manner of strange creatures in her dream, and finds herself in all sorts of curious predicaments where common sense fails and the nonsensical comes to be expected. There is no central, concrete storyline, but rather Alice moves rapidly from one bizarre situation to the next before waking once more and relating the whole adventure to her sister.

The second of the two books, "Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There," appeared in 1871 and is very similar in nature to the first, though having a slightly different plot. Here Alice steps through an ordinary looking-glass one day, only to find herself in a world where, if you wish to get anywhere, you must walk in the opposite direction! Walking toward your desired destination only gets you further and further away. Also, interestingly, the land which Alice has entered is essentially a giant chessboard, and she must move through the different squares to reach the other side if she wishes to become a queen (which she does).

The characters Carroll created in these two stories are some of the most strikingly unique and unforgettable in the world of literature. Alice herself, based largely on Alice Liddell, a real-life child of whom Carroll was very fond, is a wonderful heroine that you can't help admiring. Throughout all of her backwards and upside-down adventures, she remains ever sensible and analytical, always trying to reason her way out of the most unreasonable situations. Other characters a reader won't soon forget include the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter, the March Hare, the Dormouse, the Cheshire Cat, Bill the Lizard, the Caterpillar, the Duchess and her peppery cook, the aforementioned Queen of Hearts, the Mock Turtle, the Gryphon, the Red and White Queens, the talking flowers, Tweedledum and Tweedledee, the Sheep, Humpty Dumpty, and the Red and White Knights. Carroll also created many fascinating new creatures in his stories, including bread-and-butterflies, rocking-horseflies, "slithy toves," "mome raths" and more.

What I find most intriguing, as an adult reader of these books, is Carroll's brilliant use of wordplay and symbolism throughout the stories. Nearly everything has some sort of double meaning. There are hidden messags and subtle witticisms on every page. Carroll also includes several parodies of what were well-known songs and rhymes in England at the time. Young children will love the books for their fantastic qualities and imaginative inspiration, but most readers will not pick up on the many puns and jokes until they are a little older, so these stories really do have something to offer to anyone, no matter what age. I'd highly recommend the book to any reader - and be sure to get an edition that includes the original illustrations.