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by C. F. Payne,Dan Shaughnessy

eBook The Legend of the Curse of the Bambino download ISBN: 0689872356
Author: C. F. Payne,Dan Shaughnessy
Publisher: Simon & Schuster/Paula Wiseman Books; 1 edition (March 1, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 32
ePub: 1912 kb
Fb2: 1359 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: rtf docx doc mobi
Category: Children's Books
Subcategory: Biographies

With his adult version of this book, The Curse of the Bambino, Dan Shaughnessy milked a series of Red Sox failures . Then again, perhaps Mr. Shaughnessy will do the right thing and revise his book to acknowledge the anti-semitic roots of the "Curse" he helped popularize.

With his adult version of this book, The Curse of the Bambino, Dan Shaughnessy milked a series of Red Sox failures for nearly two decades before the team won a World Series. He would work a mention of the alleged curse into practically every column he wrote about the Red Sox. It was unvarnished hucksterism at its worst. It would be the honorable thing to do, and he should be commended if he chooses that approach.

The Curse of the Bambino was a superstition evolving from the failure of Major League Baseball (MLB)'s Boston Red Sox to win the World Series in the 86-year period from 1918 to 2004. While some fans took the curse seriously, most used the expression in a tongue-in-cheek manner.

I really liked how Dan Shaughnessy turned the Curse of the Bambino into a legend. Turning Babe Ruth into a character like Paul Bunyan or Johnny Appleseed. Oct 07, 2011 Hapzydeco rated it it was amazing. A must-read for those who are mesmerized by baseball myths. While illustrated for children this book will capture the imagination of all baseball fans. Stephen Hughes rated it liked it Aug 06, 2012.

Shaughnessy, Dan; Payne, C. illustrator. A Paula Wiseman book. It all started on January 5, 1920, a fateful day in baseball history, when the Boston Red Sox traded Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees for a mere pile of cash. That's when, some say, the Red Sox's reversal of fortune began. Before Ruth was traded, the Red Sox had been the best team in baseball, winning five of fifteen World Series. The Red Sox have come painstakingly close over those decades, but not close enough.

Did the 1920 sale of Babe Ruth by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees forever change the game? This clever book explains the history behind the infamous "Curse of the Bambino," conjecturing as to how the trade may have affected future Sox attempts to win the World.

Did the 1920 sale of Babe Ruth by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees forever change the game? This clever book explains the history behind the infamous "Curse of the Bambino," conjecturing as to how the trade may have affected future Sox attempts to win the World Series.

Here's the story of the Curse of the Bambino-the greatest baseball legend ever told. The Legend of the Curse of the Bambino (9780689872358) by Dan Shaughnessy. When not writing, Mr. Shaughnessy can often be found at a Red Sox game at Fenway Park. He lives with his family in Boston.

C. F. Payne has illustrated more than a dozen picture books, including the New York Times bestselling Mousetronaut by astronaut Mark Kelly, the Texas Bluebonnet winner Shoeless Joe & Black Betsy, written by Phil Bildner, and the New York Times bestsellers The Remarkable Farkle McBride and Micawber, both by John Lithgow. He teaches at the Columbus College of Design, where he is the chair of the Illustration Department. Payne lives with his wife and children in Cincinnati, Ohio. Visit him online at CFPayne.

Here's the story of the Curse of the Bambino - the greatest baseball legend ever told When your books are due, just pack them up and ship them back. And don't worry about shipping - it's absolutely free! Need to return a rental?

Here's the story of the Curse of the Bambino - the greatest baseball legend ever told. Shaughnessy, Dan is the author of 'Legend of the Curse of the Bambino ', published 2005 under ISBN 9780689872358 and ISBN 0689872356. When your books are due, just pack them up and ship them back. And don't worry about shipping - it's absolutely free! Need to return a rental?

The Legend of the Curse of the Bambino Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove The Legend of the Curse of the Bambino from your list? The Legend of the Curse of the Bambino.

In the wake of that defeat, author and Boston Globe sports columnist Dan Shaughnessy has updated his bewitching story of the curse that has lain over the Red Sox since they sold Babe Ruth to the hated Yankees in 1920

In the wake of that defeat, author and Boston Globe sports columnist Dan Shaughnessy has updated his bewitching story of the curse that has lain over the Red Sox since they sold Babe Ruth to the hated Yankees in 1920. Here he sheds light on classic Sox debacles?from Johnny Pesky?s so- called hesitation throw, to the horrifying dribbler that slithered between Bill Buckner?s legs, to last year?s stunning extra-inning home run that kept the Sox without a World Championship for yet another year. Lively and filled with anecdotes, this is baseball folklore at its best.

Some believe that the ghost of Babe Ruth -- the most famous baseball player who ever lived -- is still watching over the game today. What would you say? It all started on January 5, 1920, a fateful day in baseball history, when the Boston Red Sox traded Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees for a mere pile of cash. That's when, some say, the Red Sox's reversal of fortune began. Before Ruth was traded, the Red Sox had been the best team in baseball, winning five of fifteen World Series. Since then, the Yankees have had twenty-six World Series to their credit. The Red Sox have come painstakingly close over those decades, but not close enough. Could it be that Babe Ruth took revenge on the team that traded him so long ago -- making the Red Sox wait a torturous eighty-six years before they would win another World Series? Baseball legend? Fate? Coincidence? Here's the story of the Curse of the Bambino -- the greatest baseball legend ever told.
Comments: (6)
Muniath
The Legend of the Curse of the Bambino is a joy to read. It talks about Babe Ruth in his baseball career. This is a very intense story.

This story captures the magic of baseball. It shows the smiles and the tears that are a part of this game. The invisible bond among the generations is inspiring. The new players remembering the old players, really shows the dedication and love they have for this sport. The Legend of the Curse of the Bambino shares the joy of rooting for a team. When the fans get excited when their team wins is so exhilarating.

This book is a blessing for all ages. The pictures are very interesting and detailed. The clippings from the newspaper are a great touch to the story.
Light out of Fildon
Sorry, but, the reviews I have just read on Amazon,in my opinion, missed the point. The "Red Sox Curse" is essentially a legend that has been around for years, and Dan Shaughnessy's book does a great job to break it down-simply-for kids. The illustrations are great for kids and the text is simple and to the point. The book does a great job in getting the story (LEGEND) across to kids. By, the way, I'm a transplanted "New Yorker" into the Boston area, and I didn't know the legend. I, as well as my two young girls, loved the story. It gave us a whole new perspective.
RUL
Admittedly I am a Yankees fan, but I still thought--at first--this seemed like a cute book. Indeed, I even gave it as a gift to expectant parent friends from New England.

But if I'm honest, I have three problems with it.

1a: First and foremost, it perpetuates a "Curse" which was simply a face-saving method of making excuses. As better writers have said, it rationalized--even justified--ineptitude, making losing a badge of honor for Red Sox fans.

1b: The basis for said "curse" does indeed appear to be anti-Semitic in nature. (A 'Curse' born of hate, by Glenn Stout/ESPN).

2: Finally, and especially on subsequent re-readings, the book seems light. I understand it is a book for young readers, but where is the explanation for how the Sox won in 2004, other than a full moon? If there was such a "curse," how was it finally reversed?
Vishura
Let's be clear about what this book is. With his adult version of this book, The Curse of the Bambino, Dan Shaughnessy milked a series of Red Sox failures for nearly two decades before the team won a World Series. He would work a mention of the alleged curse into practically every column he wrote about the Red Sox. It was unvarnished hucksterism at its worst. With this book, Shaughnessy is attempting to repackage his nonsense into a children's book that can continue his flow of royalties now that the "curse" no longer exists. Not surprisingly, the writing is terrible, as it's simply a mail-in job.

Parents considering buying this book should also consider that Shaughnessy has used his column to mock and demean players on the Red Sox. Harsh criticism is expected from sports columists, but calling one player a "piece of garbage" and mocking another's documented mental disability is beyond the pale. Is this the sort of person you want to support with your purchases?
Mananara
One would think Shaughnessy, a.k.a The Shank, would be perfect writing for children. His Boston Globe columns amount to no more than childish drivel. Yet one should expect a writer who is so disappointing to adults to do likewise for kids. He attempts here to get his claws into children and brainwash them into believing his so-called "curse" gibberish, and therefore perpetuate his own revenue stream. The Shank's hope, so transparently self-serving, is that these kids will grow up buying more of his foolish fiction. The real "curse" was the alcoholic haze under which the Red Sox were run and managed by the Yawkeys, Harrington, et al(thank you Clark Booth and Leigh Montville, two real journalists, for pointing this out). Parents: Be warned! Keep your kids away from The Shank.
caif
In a recent ESPN article, baseball historian and author Glenn Stout revealed the truth about the so-called "Curse of the Bambino": it is rooted in anti-semitic slander that originated 80 years ago with Henry Ford's racist newspaper, the Dearborn Independent. (Evidently, Ford thought Red Sox owner Henry Frazee was Jewish.) Now that the truth has been exposed -- a truth that evidently escaped Mr. Shaughnessy's reporting of the original "Curse" -- it is sad and disappointing that Mr. Shaughnessy and his publisher have chosen to push all this on children.

Then again, perhaps Mr. Shaughnessy will do the right thing and revise his book to acknowledge the anti-semitic roots of the "Curse" he helped popularize. It would be the honorable thing to do, and he should be commended if he chooses that approach.