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eBook The Cats in Krasinski Square download

by Karen Hesse

eBook The Cats in Krasinski Square download ISBN: 1845077016
Author: Karen Hesse
Publisher: Frances Lincoln Publishers (May 1, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 32
ePub: 1485 kb
Fb2: 1764 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr lit azw rtf
Category: Children's Books

So when I found The Cats of Krasinski by Karen Hesse on the library shelf, I thought Wonderful! . I thought that putting a merry-go-round in Krasinski Square at the the beginning and end of the book was an interesting touch

I thought that putting a merry-go-round in Krasinski Square at the the beginning and end of the book was an interesting touch. Carousels are such iconic symbols of happy children having fun, yet here it is juxtaposed with and accentuating the deplorable conditions that the Nazis forced upon the Jewish children.

Karen Hesse was born in Baltimore, Maryland. 2004, The Cats in Krasinski Square, illus. She studied poetry at nearby Towson State College and married Randy Hesse in 1972 before completing her studies. She attended college at Towson University, the University of Maryland and College Park. in English with double minors in psychology, and anthropology, during which she began writing poetry. After graduating, she moved with her husband to Brattleboro, Vermont, had two children, Rachel and Kate, took jobs in publishing, and started writing children's books.

Newbery medalist Karen Hesse tells a harrowing, true story about life in the Warsaw Ghetto during WWII

Newbery medalist Karen Hesse tells a harrowing, true story about life in the Warsaw Ghetto during WWII. When Karen Hesse came upon a short article about cats out-foxing the Gestapo at the train station in Warsaw during WWII, she couldn't get the story out of her mind.

by Karen Hesse & illustrated by Wendy Watson. To foil the Nazis, the sisters gather up the feral cats of Krasinski Square in baskets. They release the cats as a distraction to the dogs, thus allowing the food to be smuggled into the ghetto. Skilled pacing renders the cat solution a satisfyingly subversive surprise while Watson’s illustration of the flummoxed Nazis underscores the ensuing chaos.

Karen Hesse grew up in Baltimore, Maryland She lives in Vermont, US. endy Watson has written and illustrated many acclaimed books for children including Father Fox's Penny Rhymes, nominated for . .

Karen Hesse grew up in Baltimore, Maryland. From an early age she dreamed of being a professional writer and after 30 years, the dream came true. Along the way she found work as a waitress, a nanny, a librarian, an agricultural labourer, a secretary and a proofreader (plus a lot of other things). In 1998 she won the Newbery Medal for her novel Out of the Dust. Karen says she loves writing and can't wait to get to her keyboard every morning. She lives in Vermont, US. endy Watson has written and illustrated many acclaimed books for children including Father Fox's Penny Rhymes, nominated for a National Book Award in the USA. She lives in Vermont, USA.

In what book, does a character use animals for a distraction? The Cats in Krasinski Square by Hesse. In which book, is food smuggled for people on the other side of the wall?

In what book, does a character use animals for a distraction? The Cats in Krasinski Square by Hesse. In which book, is food smuggled for people on the other side of the wall? The Cats in Krasinski Square by Hesse. In which book, does the setting take place in Poland during World War II? The Cats in Krasinski Square by Hesse. In which book, does a character pretend to be non-Jewish? The Cats in Krasinski Square by Hesse. In which book, does a train deliver smuggled food? The Cats in Krasinski Square by Hesse

Expand Product Details. lt;p When Newbery Medalist Karen Hesse came upon a short article about cats out-foxing the Gestapo at the train station in Warsaw during WWII, she couldn't get the story out of her mind.

The Teacher Store Cart. Expand Product Details.

The many cats roaming through Krasinski Square would be used as a part of the ploy. 1. While holding up the book for the class to see, ask students to predict what the book might be about based on the title and the illustration on the front cover. It’s a plan that cannot fail. After a couple of minutes of discussion, explain that the story is based on a true story. Talk a bit about fact and fiction. At this time a discussion of acceptance, tolerance and the human spirit would be appropriate.

Comments: (7)
Fhois
This is a lovely story to introduce children to a dark time in history in a way that shows hope and courage in the face of overwhelming odds. I'm using this book for my third-graders in our study on WWII. There is nothing graphic or disturbing either in the illustrations or the content. The author deals with the Warsaw Ghetto in a sensitive way by highlighting one story of courage and resistance in the face of Nazi evil. I highly recommend it.
Khiceog
It can be very hard to write about the Holocaust for children. Either you water down the subject so much that you trivialize it, or you give them nightmares for a year and a day. This goes doubly or triply for picture books, where the young age of your readers has to be taken into account. And of course you want a story with a hero, not just victims, if at all possible. (The truth is that there isn't much to say about the Holocaust that you can say to kids. It boils down to "It was a terrible time, and a lot of people died".)

This book manages to convey the appropriate emotions of hiding and fear ("I wear my Polish look and my Polish walk, Polish words float from my lips") without showing too strongly any actual brutality. The author doesn't shy away from the hard, and pertinent, issue of hunger; and we can see the soldiers on nearly every page, but we don't explicitly see any violence either. And the book ends on a relatively high note - they outsmart the Germans and their dogs, and get food into the Ghetto, including a special bundle for her friend who is inside, despite the danger of the location. Younger children will pick up on the accomplishment, older ones will understand (or begin to ask) about why this happened.

The afterword is particularly informative.
Goltizuru
This is a great story, and I appreciate the history at the end of the book. I use this to supplement a unit on the Holocaust for 6th grade students.
Feri
This is a wonderful story, it appealed to me as a social studies teacher. I bought it for my grandcat who is a therapy cat. It might be nice to have a senior citizen read this book to the cat, at a nursing home visit, to start an interesting conversation about World War II!
tref
Beautiful book filled with content! I use it grades 6-12 as a Read Aloud in World History classes to introduce the Russian Revolution.
Andromathris
I picked this book for an elementary school in Bronx,NY as a donation to their Read-A-Loud Celebration. I only saw the title and had no idea about the content. It is a great book to spark student interest in the holocaust. If you are a cat lover, it is an added bonus. But be warned, the story is dark.
Lemana
This is just what I ordered.This is just what I wanted and I was lucky and happy to find it available from Amazon at a good price and brought right to my door!
I will be using this book in my 6th grade history class. It's a great story about how people can survive any situation courageously, regardless of their age.