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eBook Studies in murder. download

by Edmund Lester Pearson

eBook Studies in murder. download ISBN: 1240125313
Author: Edmund Lester Pearson
Publisher: Gale, Making of Modern Law (December 20, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 306
ePub: 1916 kb
Fb2: 1384 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: txt mbr azw doc
Category: Biography
Subcategory: True Crime

Edmund Lester Pearson (1880–1937) was an American librarian and author. He was a writer of the "true crime" literary genre.

Edmund Lester Pearson (1880–1937) was an American librarian and author. Pearson was born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, on February 11, 1880. He graduated from Harvard College in 1902. His first publication was in a school periodical, The Harvard Advocate. In 1904, he graduated with a .

This 1924 book tells about five famous murders that occurred decades earlier.

Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). This 1924 book tells about five famous murders that occurred decades earlier. In all five cases, the determination of guilt or innocence rested on circumstantial evidence". The Borden Case" attracted national attention, and divided public opinion as no criminal prosecution had ever done before, or since.

Studies in murder book.

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Pearson, Edmund Lester. Ohio State University Press has reissued it in its original form accompanied by a short but beautifully written introduction by Roger Lane, the American social historian of crime and murder.

Edmund Lester Pearson (1880-1937) was a popular New York journalist and writer. Between 1924, the year "Studies in Murder" was first printed and 1936 he published six books about murder cases. The Lizzie Borden case (August 1892) was to Pearson "without parallel in the criminal history of America.

Pearson Edmund Lester. Published by Macmillan Company, New York, 1924. Meyer Boswell Books, Inc. was established in 1976 and specializes exclusively in rare and scholarly law. From Meyer Boswell Books, In. member ABAA (San Francisco, CA, . Association Member: ABAA. Price: US$ 8. 5 Convert Currency. We currently have several thousand books in stock (all posted here) dating from the 14th through the 20th centuries. We welcome inquiries. Member ABAA and ILAB.

Edmund Lester Pearson. Showing 40 of 62 results that match your query. Product - Masterpieces of Murder; An Edmund Pearson True Crime Reader Paperback. Product - Studies in Murder. Product - Masterpieces of Murder; An Edmund Pearson True Crime Reader. Masterpieces of Murder; An Edmund Pearson True Crime Reader. Masterpieces of Murder; An Edmund Pearson True Crime Reader Paperback. Sold & Shipped by Palatial Products.

Pearson, Edmund Lester was born on February 11, 1880 in Newburyport, Massachusetts, United States. Theodore Roosevelt, 1920. Books in Black or Red, 1923. Studies in Murder, 1924. Murder at Smutty Nose, 1926. Five Murders, 1928; Queer Books, 1928. Son of Edmund Carlton and Tamzen Maria (Richardson) Pearson. Bachelor of Arts, Harvard, 1902. Instigation of the Devil, 1930. More Studies in Murder, 1936. Edmund Lester Pearson has been listed as a notable author by Marquis Who's Who. Connections.

Author Pearson Edmund Lester. Categories: Fiction Literature, Nonfiction. Books by Pearson Edmund Lester: The Librarian At Play. 10 11.

The Making of the Modern Law: Legal Treatises, 1800-1926 includes over 20,000 analytical, theoretical and practical works on American and British Law. It includes the writings of major legal theorists, including Sir Edward Coke, Sir William Blackstone, James Fitzjames Stephen, Frederic William Maitland, John Marshall, Joseph Story, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and Roscoe Pound, among others. Legal Treatises includes casebooks, local practice manuals, form books, works for lay readers, pamphlets, letters, speeches and other works of the most influential writers of their time. It is of great value to researchers of domestic and international law, government and politics, legal history, business and economics, criminology and much more.++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification:++++<sourceLibrary>Yale Law School Library<collection ID>CTRG99-B1312<Notes><imprintFull>Garden City, NY : Garden City Pub. Co., [c1924]. <collation>295 p., [11] leaves of plates : port., plans ; 21 cm
Comments: (4)
Vobei
Bought for a friend.
Nahelm
Studies In Murder

This 1924 book tells about five famous murders that occurred decades earlier. Pearson was "one of the best trial and crime reporters" in the 1920s-30s. "In all five cases, the determination of guilt or innocence rested on circumstantial evidence".

"The Borden Case" attracted national attention, and divided public opinion as no criminal prosecution had ever done before, or since. Families were divided, and argued over this fascinating case. The Bordens were not of a class where these crimes are common. The verdict did not solve this puzzle. On that "intensely hot morning of Thursday, August 4, 1892" (p.9) Andrew Jackson Borden walked back to his house. In half an hour he was dead; later the body of his pre-deceased wife Abby was found. His youngest daughter Lizzie was charged with these crimes, and found "Not Guilty". This crime remains an unsolved mystery. [Arnold Brown's "Lizzie Borden: The Legend, the Truth, the Final Chapter" provided his solution.]

"The Twenty-Third Street Murder" of Friday, July 29, 1870 was of Benjamin Nathan, a New York financier. He was beaten to death in his own room, while his two sons slept in their house. The blood spattered walls and door spoke of a violent struggle; the open safe and empty cash box spoke to the motive (p.132). A newspaper pointed suspicion to one son of irregular morals. The inquest named no one. A convict in Sing Sing named a burglar. This burglar was found in Texas and brought to New York. But a case could not be made (p.155), and the suspect returned to jail in Illinois. It was never solved.

"Mate Bram" concerns the voyage of the barkentine 'Herbert Fuller' from Boston on July 3, 1896. Most of the crew was new to the ship and each other. The boat carried a load of lumber below and on top of the deck. There were some quarrels between the first and second mate. Early on the morning of July 14 the captain and his wife, along with the second mate, were murdered. The Grand Jury indicted Thomas Bram, the first mate (no bloodstains were found on him). Seaman Charley Brown testified he saw Bram kill the captain. Cross-examination revealed incidents from Brown's past that lessened his credibility. Bram was sentenced to life in prison; he served 15 years before being paroled. Six years later he was granted a full pardon. He became a prosperous businessman (p.224).

"The Hunting Knife" is about the murder of Mabel Page on March 31, 1904. Her retired father came home at 2:10PM and found her dead; money was missing from her purse. The police questioned all who had been in the neighborhood. One of these had his picture in the newspaper. A driver who gave him a ride saw this; he found a leather sheath for a knife afterwards. Charles Tucker was taken to the police station and given the usual warning of having his words used against him (p.241). While examining his overcoat, the police asked if this sheath was his; he admitted it was (!), then denied owning a knife. When his house was searched they found a pin of Mabel Page, and parts of a knife; he now admitted it was his. He was then arrested, tried, found guilty, and sentenced to death. No plea for mercy was considered (p.255).

"Uncle Amos Dreams a Dream" is about the Boorn case. Russell Colvin disappeared on May 10, 1812 from Manchester, Vermont. Seven years later his Uncle Amos dreamed that Russell was murdered by his brothers-in-law, and buried in a filled-up cellar hole. A dog began to dig by a hollow stump; bones were found. Some physicians said they were human, one didn't agree. Jesse Boorn was arrested, jailed, then admitted his brother did the killing. Stephen Boorn was arrested, but protested his innocence; he was chained in the "inner dungeon". The Grand Jury indicted them both. Russell's son described a fight; a forger in jail testified to a confession from Stephen. Stephen then confessed and said it was self-defense. Both were found guilty and sentenced to death. The brothers protested their innocence, people petitioned the State Legislature. Jesse's sentence was commuted to life imprisonment, Stephen was left to the gallows. The Rutland Herald printed an advertisement for Russell Colvin, and the death sentence of Stephen. The NY Evening Post reprinted an article from the Albany Daily Advertiser. A man from Shrewsbury NJ said a Russel Colvin from Manchester Vermont was living there. This person was asked to visit New York, then taken to Troy, then to Bennington. He was recognized and identified beyond all doubt. The Court was criticized for allowing a conviction without a dead body. A new trial was held, the charges dropped, and the Boorn brothers freed. They later moved to Ohio. People wondered why they would confess to a crime they didn't commit, but no answers were given except an "Act of God" (p.285).
Thordigda
Outstanding overview of five famous murders of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, with the lion's share of the pages going to Miss Lizzie Borden and the bizarre goings-on in Fall River, Mass in 1892. The other, less familiar cases are at least as interesting. I especially liked the chapter on the Nathan murder, a cause-celebre in New York City in the 1870's. Pearson's wonderfully biting sense of humour comes out in his disdain for the masses, and for those bizarre characters who, simply for the notoriety, manage to insert themselves into famous cases.
I would like to point out to the reviewer from Perth Amboy that the Borden case was not solved by Arnold Brown or anyone else. He came up with a solution, and like so many true crime writers, labeled it "Final". The genre is filled with books purporting to be the "Final Chapter," "The Final Solution" etc. But the real solutions to cases like this are lost in time. We can't solve the Borden murder (though I think we can all figure out the LIKELY murderer in this case without too much difficulty), we can only luxuriate in it's delightful domestic creepiness, preferably while sitting by the fire on a winter's evening reading this book.
Enjoy.
Ballagar
This 1924 book tells about five famous murders that occurred decades earlier. Pearson was "one of the best trial and crime reporters" in the 1920s-30s. "In all five cases, the determination of guilt or innocence rested on circumstantial evidence".
"The Borden Case" attracted national attention, and divided public opinion as no criminal prosecution had ever done before, or since. Families were divided, and argued over this fascinating case. The Bordens were not of a class where these crimes are common. The verdict did not solve this puzzle. On that "intensely hot morning of Thursday, August 4, 1892" (p.9) Andrew Jackson Borden walked back to his house. In half an hour he was dead; later the body of his pre-deceased wife Abby was found. His youngest daughter Lizzie was charged with these crimes, and found "Not Guilty". This crime remained a mystery until Arnold R. Brown's "Lizzie Borden: The Legend, the Truth, the Final Chapter" was published in 1991 with its solution.
"The Twenty-Third Street Murder" of Friday, July 29, 1870 was of Benjamin Nathan, a New York financier. He was beaten to death in his own room, while his two sons slept in their house. The blood spattered walls and door spoke of a violent struggle; the open safe and empty cash box spoke to the motive (p.132). A newspaper pointed suspicion to one son of irregular morals. The inquest named no one. A convict in Sing Sing named a burglar. This burglar was found in Texas and brought to New York. But a case could not be made (p.155), and the suspect returned to jail in Illinois. It was never solved.
"Mate Bram" concerns the voyage of the barkentine 'Herbert Fuller' from Boston on July 3, 1896. Most of the crew was new to the ship and each other. The boat carried a load of lumber below and on top of the deck. There were some quarrels between the first and second mate. Early on the morning of July 14 the captain and his wife, along with the second mate, were murdered. The Grand Jury indicted Thomas Bram, the first mate (no bloodstains were found on him). Seaman Charley Brown testified he saw Bram kill the captain. Cross-examination revealed incidents from Brown's past that lessened his credibility. Bram was sentenced to life in prison; he served 15 years before being paroled. Six years later he was granted a full pardon. He became a prosperous businessman (p.224).
"The Hunting Knife" is about the murder of Mabel Page on March 31, 1904. Her retired father came home at 2:10PM and found her dead; money was missing from her purse. The police questioned all who had been in the neighborhood. One of these had his picture in the newspaper. A driver who gave him a ride saw this; he found a leather sheath for a knife afterwards. Charles Tucker was taken to the police station and given the usual warning of having his words used against him (p.241). While examining his overcoat, the police asked if this sheath was his; he admitted it was (!), then denied owning a knife. When his house was searched they found a pin of Mabel Page, and parts of a knife; he now admitted it was his. He was then arrested, tried, found guilty, and sentenced to death. No plea for mercy was considered (p.255).
"Uncle Amos Dreams a Dream" is about the Boorn case. Russell Colvin disappeared on May 10, 1812 from Manchester, Vermont. Seven years later his Uncle Amos dreamed that Russell was murdered by his brothers-in-law, and buried in a filled-up cellar hole. A dog began to dig by a hollow stump; bones were found. Some physicians said they were human, one didn't agree. Jesse Boorn was arrested, jailed, then admitted his brother did the killing. Stephen Boorn was arrested, but protested his innocence; he was chained in the "inner dungeon". The Grand Jury indicted them both. Russell's son described a fight; a forger in jail testified to a confession from Stephen. Stephen then confessed and said it was self-defense. Both were found guilty and sentenced to death. The brothers protested their innocence, people petitioned the State Legislature. Jesse's sentence was commuted to life imprisonment, Stephen was left to the gallows. The Rutland Herald printed an advertisement for Russell Colvin, and the death sentence of Stephen. The NY Evening Post reprinted an article from the Albany Daily Advertiser. A man from Shrewsbury NJ said a Russel Colvin from Manchester Vermont was living there. This person was asked to visit New York, then taken to Troy, then to Bennington. He was recognized and identified beyond all doubt. The Court was criticized for allowing a conviction without a dead body. A new trial was held, the charges dropped, and the Boorn brothers freed. They later moved to Ohio. People wondered why they would confess to a crime they didn't commit, but no answers were given except an "Act of God" (p.285).