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by John Limond Hart

eBook The CIA's Russians download ISBN: 1591143527
Author: John Limond Hart
Publisher: Naval Institute Press (June 30, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 264
ePub: 1549 kb
Fb2: 1775 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: rtf lit lit lrf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: True Crime

The CIA's Russians book.

The CIA's Russians book. During the Cold War a number of high-ranking Soviet citizens spied for. Unlike many authors who write about spies, John Hart know During the Cold War a number of high-ranking Soviet citizens spied for the CIA, providing the United States with valuable information while putting themselves and their families in great danger. In this book a seasoned CIA field operator and station chief looks at what drove these agents to betray their own country.

John Limond Hart joined the CIA in 1948, serving as chief of operations in Korea, Thailand, Morocco, and Vietnam, managing operations against China and Cuba, and heading CIA operations in Western Europe from 1968 to 1971. Hardcover: 264 pages. Publisher: Naval Institute Press (June 30, 2003).

During the Cold War a number of high-ranking Soviet citizens spied for the CIA, providing the United States with valuable information while putting themselves and their families in great danger

During the Cold War a number of high-ranking Soviet citizens spied for the CIA, providing the United States with valuable information while putting themselves and their families in great danger.

Science Facts Skeleton (Dorling Kindersley Eyewitness Books) . Посмотреть все изображения. First French Dictionary - D. df.

The 100 Books of the Century (French: Les cent livres du siècle) is a list of the one hundred best books of the 20th century, according to a poll conducted in the spring of 1999 by the French retailer Fnac and the Paris newspaper Le Monde

The 100 Books of the Century (French: Les cent livres du siècle) is a list of the one hundred best books of the 20th century, according to a poll conducted in the spring of 1999 by the French retailer Fnac and the Paris newspaper Le Monde. Starting from a preliminary list of 200 titles created by bookshops and journalists, 17,000 French voters responded to the question, "Which books have remained in your memory?" (Quels livres sont restés dans votre mémoire ?).

In this book a seasoned CIA field operator and station chief looks at what drove these agents to betray their . Reflowable eTextbooks do not maintain the layout of a traditional bound book.

In this book a seasoned CIA field operator and station chief looks at what drove these agents to betray their own country. Reflowable eTextbooks may also contain embedded audio, video, or interactive components in addition to Bookshelf's standard study tools.

78 the two men planned a meeting: Ibid. 78 all I want is my money : Ibid.

77 contact with persons dissimilar to themselves : John Stuart Mill, The Principles of Political Economy (Amherst, MA: Prometheus Books, 2004), 543. 77 reminds one more of a sleepwalker’s : Arthur Koestler, The Sleepwalkers: A History of Man’s Changing Vision of the Universe (New York: Penguin, 1964), 1. 78 the two men planned a meeting: Ibid. 78 I was snookered : John Limond Hart, The CIA’s Russians (Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, 2003), 132. 78 defect and resettle in the United States: Ibid. 135. 79 James Jesus Angleto. as skeptical: Ibid.

John Hart Author life is good. Eventually, the book will come to market and the readers will decide if I’ve ill-spent a year of my life (or two years, or thre. In-between, though, is a kind of dead zone-the book is out of my hands, the publishers are hard at work t they’re doing I won’t see for a long time. We still have seven months before the book is released. That’s June 23rd for those who keep trac. Even in this quiet zone, though, there are some pretty awesome moments, and the best is when I see the cover for the first time. After all, it is the book’s face!

Personal Name: Hart, John Limond, 1920-. Publication, Distribution, et. Annapolis, Md. Download book The CIA's Russians, John Limond Hart.

Personal Name: Hart, John Limond, 1920-. Annapolis, M. .Naval Institute Press, (c)2003.

During the Cold War a number of high-ranking Soviet citizens spied for the CIA, providing the United States with valuable information while putting themselves and their families in great danger. In this book a seasoned CIA field operator and station chief looks at what drove these agents to betray their own country. Unlike many authors who write about spies, John Hart knows the espionage profession first-hand, and his penetrating analysis of the motivations involved is based on top-secret operational files. Four major Soviet agents - Yuri Nosenko, the dissident KGB agent who disclosed the bugs in the American Embassy in Moscow and claimed the KGB had no connection to the assassination of President Kennedy; Oleg Penkovsky, one of the West's most important agents who was eventually executed by the Soviets; and Pyotr Popov and Mikhail - are examined in depth, and the cases of six others are discussed. The stories of each reveal a great deal about the realities of the intelligence craft. Hart became so intrigued with the reasons behind the agents' spying activities that he asked then-CIA director Richard Helms for time off to investigate the cases. For a full year he searched for common denominators in the personalities of these Soviet moles that would explain their willingness to take such life-threatening risks. He had complete access to their operational files, including psychological profiles. He studied not only documentation of the material the agents provided but also their own accounts of their thoughts and emotions when they divulged secrets that could damage their homeland. This behind-the-headlines look at what makes spies tick is aimed at every reader with a penchant for good spy stories.
Comments: (3)
Xangeo
John Hart is unusual in that he retired after an apparently distinguished career at the CIA and wrote an officially authorized public version of his last assignment (which started in 1971): An analysis of the personalities and psychological profiles of a number of Soviet defectors. His goal was to identify any common characteristics that might be useful in targeting future defectors and evaluating their potential to provide useful and reliable intelligence.
Hart describes three publicly known defectors in depth, one identified only as Mikhail, briefly, and an additional six in a very cursory manner, apparently because their cases are still sensitive. He then seeks to identify common traits among the 10 cases, concluding that they were characterized by many of the following: (1) All were senior and relatively successful members of the Soviet intelligence community, KGB or GRU, having attained a typical rank of colonel, (all but one of the ten were military officers), (2) they felt resentful toward the Soviet system either because of its failure to recognize and promote them further or because it left them feeling excluded from its elite, (3) they were not motivated to defect by politics, religion, or idealism, (4) most had placed themselves in a compromised situation by poor management of personal or government funds and were seeking money to resolve these dilemmas with western funds, and (5) most thought that they were too smart to be caught by Soviet counterintelligence until it was too late. Of the four cases in which Hart reports the outcome, three were executed by the Soviets, only one successfully defected.
In relating these stories, Hart produces some fascinating insights.
Oleg Penkovsky, undoubtedly the most capable of the ten, provided intelligence on the capabilities and intentions of the Soviet leadership during the 1962 Cuban missile crisis that were probably key to President Kennedy's decision to face down Khrushchev's threats. Based on Penkovsky's reports, it was apparent that Khrushchev was bluffing.
Yuri Nosenko, the sole successful defector, was caught up in the paranoid webs spun by James Jesus Angleton who was then the head of CIA counterintelligence. Angleton saw Soviet plots behind virtually everything, including Nosenko, despite the fact that Nosenko had identified the locations of numerous listening devices in the US embassy in Moscow. Nosenko was imprisoned for much of his first two years in the US and subjected to solitary confinement and harsh interrogation. Eventually, Director Richard Helms intervened to end the mistreatment. Happily, Nosenko was exonerated and placed on the CIA payroll.

Hart also offers the fascinating hypothesis that Lenin, in forcing Russia to adopt the European industrial model, transformed Russia, perhaps permanently, from a Eurasian to a European society and nation, ending the Slavophile-Modernizer debate. It will be interesting to see if this theory is correct.
Sharpbringer
This is a small book -- speaking comparatively with reference to other histories of espionage. It is easy to read and fascinating.

Each chapter is given to a different person in the service of the Soviet Union who became a spy for the United States -- some successfully, some disastrously not so.

If you are looking for a grand view of Cold War espionage, it is not here. Instead, you will find, perhaps, some psycological insights into the different kinds of characters who betrayed the Soviet Union and the unique and very dangerous possibilities that they had to deal with. You may also pick up some details of "the craft" as it was practiced by the CIA at the height of the Cold War.

Some of the characters are tragic, some sympathetic, and others will just plain leave you cold.

All in all, the book is a small but quite useful contribution to understanding a crucial time and an epochal struggle that is rapidly ebbing from the collective memory.
Sinredeemer
Echoing the comments above, this is a fascinating pyschological "profiling" of some of the leading Soviet defector cases of the 1950s-60s. For another, more sinister view of Nosenko, I recommend Spy Wars by Bagley, one of his case officers. Mikhail, one of the minor cases described here, sticks in my mind the most - I guess because I know the other cases so well. Mikhail was apparently a Soviet Illegal, a Spanish speaker operating out of Orly, France (to target NATO) circa 1958. This apparently incompetent screw up walks in to US to reimburse the funds he has spent chasing women; sad, but somewhat common in the espionage world. Like many of his ilk, he is of marginal value, and of course, oblivious to his own safety, is summoned to Moscow, never to return (executed). Hart's analysis of their personalities and foibles is meat for any aspiring Case Officers. This is on my Reading List of important intel works - Retired CIA Ops officer/Russian specialist and lecturer