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eBook What We Have: A Memoir download

by Amy Boesky

eBook What We Have: A Memoir download ISBN: 159240636X
Author: Amy Boesky
Publisher: Avery; Reprint edition (July 5, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 336
ePub: 1770 kb
Fb2: 1919 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mobi lrf rtf docx
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Specific Groups

What We Have, a memoir by Amy Boesky, is a look into the life of a young woman who grew up with the threat of cancer hanging over her head

What We Have, a memoir by Amy Boesky, is a look into the life of a young woman who grew up with the threat of cancer hanging over her head. Grandmothers, aunts, and great-aunts, all of whom died in their 40's from ovarian cancer, created a shadow of fear that followed her every step. She knew at 35 she would have her ovaries removed, just as her mother did.

Beautifully written with a mix of heartbreak and joy, What We Have by Amy Boesky is a deeply moving memoir of family dynamics. Amy Boesky tells her story as a daughter, a wife, a sister, a mother and of course as herself, a type A minus personality, whose life has been structured with special focus on time, considering the women in her family rarely live past the age of fifty.

At thirty-two, Amy Boesky thought she had it all figured out: a wonderful new man in her life, a great job, and the (nearly) perfect home

In a true story as compelling as the best in women's fiction, written with the sagacity of Joan Didion and the elegance of Amy Bloom, Amy Boesky's journey celebrates the promise of a full life, even in the face of uncertainty. At thirty-two, Amy Boesky thought she had it all figured out: a wonderful new man in her life, a great job, and the (nearly) perfect home. For once, she was almost able to shake the terrible fear that had gripped her for as long as she could remember.

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Sacha was asleep, and I was sitting up in bed, reading a monograph on early modern horoscopes. I’ve always been a night owl.

Sacha was asleep, and I was sitting up in bed, reading a monograph on early modern horoscopes hen everyone else is asleep, the whole world is quiet, and for once, you can actually think. It’s the time of day cut loose from logistics, schedules, planning. The word horoscope literally means to watch the hour. In theory, if you study the hour when you were born, something will be revealed both about your character and about events to come. Auspicious and inauspicious days

Amy Boesky is an American author and a professor of English at Boston College. Born in Detroit, Boesky studied her undergraduate degree at Harvard College before completing a . hil in Renaissance English at the University of Oxford.

Amy Boesky is an American author and a professor of English at Boston College.

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Amy Boesky is Chair of the Department and directs BC’s minor in Medical Humanities. Trained in early modern literature, she regularly teaches courses on early representations of self, body, and biomedical culture.

Amy Boesky - What we have : a memoir. Amy Bogaard - Neolithic Farming in Central Europe: An Archaeobotanical Study of Crop Husbandry Practices. Читать pdf.

An inspiring true story of the women in one family and their fight against cancer that Patricia Wood, author of Lottery, calls "utterly breathtaking". At thirty-two, Amy Boesky had it all: a wonderful new man in her life, a great job, and the (nearly) perfect home. For once, she was almost able to shake the terrible fear that had gripped her for as long as she could remember. Women in her family had always died young-from cancer-and she and her sisters were previvors growing up in time's shadow. But rather than dwelling on fear, Amy wanted to plan for a new baby and live her life. In What We Have, Amy shares a transformative year in her family's life and invites readers to join in their joy, laughter, and grief.
Comments: (7)
Conjulhala
Amy Boesky's book is not just an important book about what it means to be a "pre-vivor" - someone who is at heightened risk for cancer due to family history and knows pre-childbearing that she'll have to have prophylactic surgery so that she won't get cancer. What this book was, above all, to me was simply an excellently written memoir, and a memoir of a mother, well-loved and much missed.

There were scenes in this book that made me, as a writer myself, simply want to throw away my computer and all my notebooks because I thought I could never craft a sentence as beautifully as Ms. Boesky did, put together a metaphor as equisitely, explain the day-to-dayness of it all, from the screaming baby to the dying mother.

So, yes, five stars and highly recommended, and anything else I can say. Read the book.
Sti
A beautifully rendered portrait of genetic illness and the impact it has on family dynamics from one generation to another. Boesky is an outstanding writer, and in this book she has given us a snapshot into her own life and journey as she and others in her family deal with the ever-present threat of cancer. Inspiring and at times funny, she shows us that a healthy perspective can sometimes be the best of medicines.
Uafrmaine
Amy Boesky writes a beautiful memoir about living in a family with the genetic predisposition for ovarian and breast cancer. Reading as her family lives through the years prior, and during, the discovery of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations makes me so grateful that I, and my own family is facing this disease with so much more information, and many more options.
Yananoc
Great & interest to see how someone had to cope as my mother just found out she has stage 4 ovarian cancer.
Morad
What We Have, a memoir by Amy Boesky, is a look into the life of a young woman who grew up with the threat of cancer hanging over her head. Grandmothers, aunts, and great-aunts, all of whom died in their 40's from ovarian cancer, created a shadow of fear that followed her every step. She knew at 35 she would have her ovaries removed, just as her mother did. When her mother developed breast cancer, she and her sisters breathed a sigh of relief--it was not the deadly ovarian cancer.

Amy allows her readers to understand the fears she grew up with and see how it shaped her personality and her life. You share with her the joys and tears of things now and things past. The story is beautifully woven with the past interlacing with the present and building the future.

I laughed, I cried. I felt like Amy was my best friend. I grieved along with her. I shared in her joys. I understood her fears. I felt like I was part of her world and didn't want to put the book down. This is an enthralling memoir that tops my list of must reads.

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book from Penguin Group for review purposes. This review contains my honest opinions.
FRAY
I think we all live on borrowed time in this life but for some it's even more borrowed. Such is the case for Amy Boesky, author of What We Have: One Family's Inspiring Story About Love, Loss, and Survival. For as long as Amy can remember her family has always lived with the threat of the big C word - cancer - hanging over their heads and hearts. What we Have is Amy Boesky's memoir - a haunting look at what cancer can take from you yet keeping the faith that you will move on and survive.

At thirty-two, Amy feels that she has everything to live for - she's finally met the man of her dreams, married him and made a home. She's also landed her dream job yet always on the sidelines is the knowledge that she must have children soon if she's going to have them or it will be too late. You see for Amy and all the women in their family, it is important that they have surgery to remove their ovaries by thirty-five years old to prevent the ovarian cancer that runs rampant in their family and kills all of the women (yes, all of them). One quote that struck me from Amy was...

'That's how it is for me, thinking about the future. Two different shapes. One holding time; the other escaping it. One suggesting fragility, confinement; the other, something transcendent. Turn it one way, you see an hourglass. Turn it the other way, and you see wings.' (pg 3)

The women in Amy's family have died young - most before the age of forty-five from cancer. This overshadows every decision and thought she has. She has planned from a girl just how her life would go - meet someone, have kids as soon as possible and have the surgery recommended by her doctor just as her sisters have done as well. All of this in the hopes of changing the course of tragedy that has gone before in their family.

Amy goes on though and has two girls, makes a home and continues to move on the best way she can but this fear of death has Amy cringing at everything. Is that a lump - what is that pain? Will I be there for my girls as they grow up? She and her sisters talk back and forth -their oldest sister Sara, already having had her ovaries out but Amy and Julie haven't. This has always been a constant in their lives - this knowledge that surgery is the only way to prevent death. Then the hammer falls - their mother gets breast cancer - now what? Now they learn that breast and ovarian cancer are often related and that they don't just carry the gene for one, but for both.

As times goes on the family learns that they are carriers of a breast/ovarian cancer gene. This changes things quite a bit for the girls. What will they decide now - how far will you go to prevent cancer? Where do you draw the line and just live your life? These are all issues that Amy has had to face and make decisions on. She handles her life with a grace and determination - she's going to see her girls grow up, she's going to be happy, and most of all she's going to enjoy her life.

This memoir reads like a novel and definitely kept my interest although some parts did drag a bit for me. I didn't really connect with anyone in the novel although my heart went out to all of them. My connection is more to this story as my family carries this gene as well. Some of the women in my family have gone forward with the surgeries they feel will keep them alive longer and others of us haven't but it is always something that is never far from your thoughts.

At times this memoir is very difficult to read and more than once I was reaching for my tissue box but at the same time there are many hopeful moments like in the birth of new children and the hope of another tomorrow. What we Have is beautifully written in a very real way that takes you right into Amy's life and has you feeling as though you are right there helping them deal with all that is happening to them. I think this book is well suited for those who may deal with having this gene run in their family and live with this fear as well as for anyone who just enjoys a heartfelt memoir that will tug at their heartstrings. This novel makes us sit back, realize what all our blessings are and to remember to live each and every day to the fullest.