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eBook Sleep Demons: An Insomniac's Memoir download

by Bill Hayes

eBook Sleep Demons: An Insomniac's Memoir download ISBN: 0671028146
Author: Bill Hayes
Publisher: Washington Square Press (February 27, 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 368
ePub: 1964 kb
Fb2: 1971 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: txt doc mobi lrf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Specific Groups

Sleep Demons is a beautiful, poetic book that masterfully weaves science with storytelling. Hayes is one of the most peotic writers of recent memory. He weaves the story of his life with the development and findings of sleep science

Sleep Demons is a beautiful, poetic book that masterfully weaves science with storytelling. He weaves the story of his life with the development and findings of sleep science. He is a lifetime insomniac and documents his struggle and ultimate understanding of the meaning of sleep and insomnia in his life. He grew up in Spokane and ultimately moves to San Francisco during the height of the AIDS epidemic. His experiences and description of San Francisco at that time is one of the most beautiful, true representations of that era.

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Bill Hayes has struggled with insomnia since childhood

Bill Hayes has struggled with insomnia since childhood. At eight he began to sleep walk, which he ascribes to the realisation that he was gay. Racked by self-doubt, his young mind was trying to flee toward a dreamed-up boy, with a new story, a different version of myself. As an adult, he sought answers to his troubled relationship with sleep in the life and work of pioneering sleep scientist Nathaniel Kleitman. Like Hayes, Kleitman was a man obsessed with it. First published in 2001 and now reissued with a new preface, this was Hayes’s first book.

Hayes, a lifelong insomniac, pursues sleep as avidly and lyrically as Nabokov pursued butterflies. Sleep Demons is a lovely weave of memory and science, great characters and compassionate humor. San Francisco Chronicle. Insomniacs will love it for the sense of connection and solution; the rest of your (grrr) for its wisdom and wonderful writing.

New York : Pocket Books

New York : Pocket Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. A memoir explores the role of sleep, or lack therof, in the author's life, from childhood sleep disturbances to adolescent sleepwalking to adult insomnia, and discusses such topics as narcolepsy, sleeptalking, and sleep apnea.

Sleep Demons: An Insomniac’s Memoir. We often think of sleep as mere stasis, a pause button we press at the end of each day. Yet sleep is full of untold mysteries-eluding us when we seek it too fervently, throwing us into surreal dream worlds when we don’t, sometimes even possessing our bodies so that they walk and talk without our conscious volition. Delving into the mysteries of his own sleep patterns, Bill Hayes marvels, I have come to see that sleep itself tells a story.

We often think of sleep as mere stasis, a pause button we press at the end of each day. An acclaimed journalist and memoirist-and partner of the late neurologist Oliver Sacks-Hayes has been plagued by insomnia his entire life.

Hayes is finally convinced to try and do something about his own insomnia when his partner Steve becomes very .

Hayes is finally convinced to try and do something about his own insomnia when his partner Steve becomes very ill with AIDS himself; the stress of caregiving makes Hayes' usual sleep difficulties even worse, and his growing use of sleeping pills doesn't help. But when the new protease inhibitors give Steve a respite from the disease, Hayes decides that maybe he can give science a chance as well, and goes to a sleep clinic

Yet sleep is full of untold mysteries-eluding us when we seek it too fervently, throwing us into surreal dream .

Yet sleep is full of untold mysteries-eluding us when we seek it too fervently, throwing us into surreal dream worlds when we don’t, sometimes even possessing our bodies so that they walk and talk without our conscious volition.

An intriguing memoir explores the role of sleep--or the lack thereof--in his life, from childhood sleep disturbances to adolescent sleepwalking to adult insomnia and an ever-increasing and debilitating sleep disorder as an adult as he discusses such topics as narcolepsy, sleeptalking, sleep apnea, modern-day sleeping aids and clinics, and more.
Comments: (7)
Goldfury
This is a book that cannot decide what wants to be. The parts that try to be a memoir deserve from two to five stars as the book proceeds. I don't really care to read about generic suburban childhoods - please stop including them in memoirs - but it is in his first-person accounts of life as a young gay man during the AIDS epidemic in the latter parts of the book where the author finds his voice. On the other hand, the parts that try to be a popular account of the history of sleep research are at best mildly interesting and deserve only two stars. Splitting the difference, it pains me to give it only three stars, because I really like the author and would like to see more of his work. (A recent essay of his in the New York Times, "A Year in Trees", had me in tears.) There is much that is mysterious, exciting, and illuminating about the modern science of sleep, but this book is not the place to read about it. In my opinion, the book would have worked better as a real memoir, with the theme of insomnia and sleep science perhaps limited to short epigraphs at the start of each chapter.
Abuseyourdna
I found Sleep Demons, An Insomniac's memoir, to be an excellent and intriguing study of the history of sleep. From discoveries, to theories, to even the `average Joe's' thoughts and input. Bill Hayes gets a five across the board for an overall performance.
Gashakar
I found Sleep Demons, An Insomniac's memoir, to be an excellent and intriguing study of the history of sleep. From discoveries, to theories, to even the `average Joe's' thoughts and input. Bill Hayes gets a five across the board for an overall performance.
Araath
excellent.
Funky
This fascinating memoir weaves in facts about sleep disorders (including insomnia and somnambulism) and the study of sleep all in with the story of Hayes's life. Each chapter uses aspects of his life as a springboard for a discussion of things related to sleep. Sometimes the details almost became monotonous or tedious, but Hayes's style kept me interested in the intriguing details and little known information. I learned so much in this book, as well as thoroughly enjoyed the various reminiscences of Hayes's life, like his apparently inherited insomnia, his partner Steve's battles with HIV, and his search for a "cure" for his insomnia. He ultimately doesn't find an absolute cure, but rather he must come to grips with his unique sleeping patterns. This is an amazing memoir sure to fascinate even those who enjoy a good night's sleep.
Perilanim
Sleep Demons is a beautiful, poetic book that masterfully weaves science with storytelling. Hayes is one of the most peotic writers of recent memory. He weaves the story of his life with the development and findings of sleep science. He is a lifetime insomniac and documents his struggle and ultimate understanding of the meaning of sleep and insomnia in his life. He grew up in Spokane and ultimately moves to San Francisco during the height of the AIDS epidemic. His experiences and description of San Francisco at that time is one of the most beautiful, true representations of that era. He brilliantly captures the emotional and very personal toll the AIDS epidemic has on an individual and a couple. The book is also a love story, describing the relationship he has with his longtime partner, Steve who has AIDS. Their relationship is inspirational. The book is many things all at once -- a primer on sleep, a memoir, a love story. And the book is at times, gut wrenchingly funny. Hayes has a great sense of humor and his keen, smart observations of the everyday are right-on and very funny. I laughed and cried reading this book. He has the rare ability to be simply descriptive and write moving, poetic prose at the same time. I can't remember a book that so succesfully combines genres so beautifully and succesfully. I couldn't put the book down and was sorry to see it end.
Yar
When I first saw this book at my local library, I pounced on it with great excitement. From the jacket notes, I was expecting an interesting melange of fact and memoir. Instead, the book is slim on facts--Mr. Hayes seems to be more fascinated with the scientists who have studied sleep rather than their findings--but rich in memoir. The author recalls interesting scenes from his childhood and adolescence, some of which involve his sleep and sleep routines, but most which don't. I found the description of his coming out poignant; and I read, on the edge my seat, about his lover's changing HIV status. The author should have stuck to memoir or perhaps even have fictionalized his own story (from which he seems able to pull the best parts) and left his thin description of sleep disorders out of the manuscript.
A perfect blend of interesting facts and touching memoirs so well intertwined that the reading of the book was quite smooth and enjoyable. I love the author's attention to scientific detail, yet it didn't have that 'college textbook' feel. Bill's personal memoirs were fun, insightful, and endearing. Anyone who has had trouble sleeping and/or self-discovery issues will love this book.