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eBook What about Darwin?: All Species of Opinion from Scientists, Sages, Friends, and Enemies Who Met, Read, and Discussed the Naturalist Who Changed the World download

by Thomas F. Glick

eBook What about Darwin?: All Species of Opinion from Scientists, Sages, Friends, and Enemies Who Met, Read, and Discussed the Naturalist Who Changed the World download ISBN: 080189462X
Author: Thomas F. Glick
Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press (June 28, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 552
ePub: 1484 kb
Fb2: 1714 kb
Rating: 4.6
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Category: Biography
Subcategory: Professionals and Academics

In this dictionary of quotations, Darwin scholar Thomas F. Glick has used a diverse collection drawn from essays, letters, novels, short stories, plays, poetry, speeches, and parodies that shows Darvin's ideas permeating all areas of thought.

In this dictionary of quotations, Darwin scholar Thomas F. The quotations trace a broad conversation about Darwin across great distances of time and space, revealing his profound influence on the great thinkers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Personal Name: Darwin, Charles, 1809-1882 Influence History.

Glick, Thomas F. Publication, Distribution, et. Baltimore. Johns Hopkins University Press, (c)2010. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

What about Darwin? book. His Origin of Species changed the world. Naturalists, clerics, politicians, novelists, poets, musicians, economists, and philosophers alike could not help but engage his theory of evolution. Whatever their view of his theory, however, those who met Darwin were unfailingly charmed by his modesty, kindness, honesty, and seriousness of purpose.

What about Darwin?: all species of opinion from scientists, sages, friends, and enemies who met, read, and discussed the naturalist who changed the world. 2010, Johns Hopkins University Press. Download for print-disabled. Libraries near you: WorldCat.

In this unique dictionary of quotations, Darwin scholar Thomas Glick presents fascinating observations about . What was it about Darwin that generated such widespread interest? His Origin of Species changed the world.

In this unique dictionary of quotations, Darwin scholar Thomas Glick presents fascinating observations about Darwin and his ideas from such notable figures as P. T. Barnum, Anton Chekhov, Mahatma Gandhi, Carl Jung, Martin Luther King, Mao Tse-tung, Pius IX, Jules Verne, and Virginia Woolf.

Baltimore (Maryland): Johns Hopkins University Press.

Author: Thomas F. Glick. Title: What about Darwin?: All Species of Opinion from Scientists, Sages, Friends, and Enemies Who Met, Read, and Discussed the Natural. Help us to make General-Ebooks better!

all species of opinion from scientists, sages, friends, and enemies who met, read, and discussed the naturalist who changed . Charles Darwin (1809-1882) Influence.

all species of opinion from scientists, sages, friends, and enemies who met, read, and discussed the naturalist who changed the world. Includes bibliographical references and index.

Thomas F. Glick: What about Darwin? All species of opinion from scientists, sages, friends, and enemies who met, read, and discussed the naturalist who changed the world. Authors and affiliations. Here a tall man met us; he wore the comfortable jacket of a country gentleman; it was Charles Darwin himself, who greeted us graciously. His head was reminiscent of that of Socrates, yet it was noticeably lengthened; truly Socratic was the unusually broad and high forehead, which continued up to the high arch of his bald head, surrounded on both sides on the temples by gray hair.

Charles Darwin and his revolutionary ideas inspired pundits the world over to put pen to paper. In this unique dictionary of quotations, Darwin scholar Thomas Glick presents fascinating observations about Darwin and his ideas from such notable figures as P. T. Barnum, Anton Chekhov, Mahatma Gandhi, Carl Jung, Martin Luther King, Mao Tse-tung, Pius IX, Jules Verne, and Virginia Woolf.

What was it about Darwin that generated such widespread interest? His Origin of Species changed the world. Naturalists, clerics, politicians, novelists, poets, musicians, economists, and philosophers alike could not help but engage his theory of evolution. Whatever their view of his theory, however, those who met Darwin were unfailingly charmed by his modesty, kindness, honesty, and seriousness of purpose.

This diverse collection drawn from essays, letters, novels, short stories, plays, poetry, speeches, and parodies demonstrates how Darwin’s ideas permeated all areas of thought. The quotations trace a broad conversation about Darwin across great distances of time and space, revealing his profound influence on the great thinkers of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Comments: (7)
the monster
This is a collection of opinions expressed by key figures in the history about Darwin's theory of evolution, which reflects on how his theory touched their minds and hearts. Darwin influenced a very wide range of people from all fields. Examples include; Pope Pius IX, Albert Einstein, Werner Heisenberg, Mahatma Gandhi, President Abraham Lincoln, President Theodore Roosevelt, President Woodrow Wilson, Lenin, Stalin, John Maynard Keynes, Bertrand Russell, Charles Dickens, and many others. Many were Darwin's enemies, some ridiculed his theory, and many became evolutionists. The Wilberforce - Huxley debate at Oxford in July 1860 was a turning point in the acceptance of Darwinism in England. Most of the elite had been won over in first few months of his publication, "On the origin of species."

A summary of some of the comments of his admirers and his critics are as follows: I very much like physicist Ernst Mach's criticism of Darwin in which he observes that if preservation of species had been more important than adaptation, struggle for survival, and evolution; then species would move in a vicious circle like "perpetual motion" in physics. Albert Einstein provides a cautionary note in his opinion that human beings should not confuse the struggle for survival as a justification to dominate another human being for economic reasons. Einstein praises the depth of Darwin's investigation into the natural history of life. German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche presents a notoriously anti-English, and highly critical of Darwin's theory, and uses the word "mediocre spirit" and "mediocre Englishman" few times in his criticism. Physicist Werner Heisenberg observes that evolution of a complex molecular structure from simple molecules needs not only the laws of physics and chemistry but also the key concepts of evolution enunciated by Darwin. Clergyman Henry Beecher was the first minister of a Christian church in United States to accept Darwin's theory as the truthful description of natural history, and he is known to have used his sermon on March 11, 1860 to express his support. But the opposition in church was also widespread. Evangelist Billy Sunday ridiculed Darwin's theory of evolution and called fellow scientists who support Darwin as "feeble minded." He called Christians who believe in evolution are essentially nonbelievers of the Word of God.

The Darwin's correspondence project ([...]) and the Darwin online ([...]) also provide useful info about numerous Darwin's letters. At the end of the book, having read 442 criticisms, the reader gets an idea of how much his theory stirred the minds of people. It also gives a picture of various aspects of his life, his work, and his personality. Recently there have been many reports suggesting that Darwin's family had ill effects of inbreeding, but in spite of his poor health conditions and personal tragedies, Darwin had lasting effect on the way we think about our origin and our natural history.

1. The Origin Of Species: 150th Anniversary Edition
Villo
What I hoped this book would be is a sort of "Bartlett's Darwin Quotations," containing both friendly and hostile quotes about the man and his theory. As such, the book would be a useful compendium for writers looking for a piquant quote to make their point. Unfortunately, my hope for this book is unrealized.

"What about Darwin?" is indeed a book of quotes about Darwin by friendly and hostile sources, but its usefulness lies elsewhere. If you are a historian looking into the reception-history of Darwin's ideas, as well as primary sources describing the man, this is the first book you need to read. Glick organizes the quotes by last name and puts an asterix next to the names of people quoted elsewhere in the text. This allows the reader to uncover the social networks in 19th-century England and North America that helped disseminate Darwin's ideas, and critiques of those ideas.

Unfortunately, in my opinion, many of the quotes have little usefulness beyond that limited purpose. Take, for example, the entry on P.T. Barnum. Barnum, described as an "American Circus Impressario," was eminently quotable. Glick doesn't quote Barnum on Darwin, however. He quotes George Templeton Strong and an advertisement about Barnum's "What is IT?" exhibit, as well as the April 18, 1873, issue of the "Brooklyn Eagle" on Barnum's contribution to natural history. As illustration of reception-history, these quotes work well to show how Darwin's ideas were transmitted to and perceived by popular culture. But what else is a writer to make of Strong's quote: "Stopped at Barnum's on my way downtown to see the much advertised non-descript, the 'What-is-it.' [...] The creature's [...] anatomical details are fearfully simian, and he's a great fact for Darwin"?

There are far better quote's in the book, of course. But there's also a lot of this stuff.

As I said, these quotes are useful for a very narrow purpose. But if you're a writer looking for something like "Bartlett's Darwin Quotations," this is not the book for you.
Vuzahn
I have a friend, a professor of Romance Languages, whose entire career has been occupied with compiling bibliographies in various languages of works that refer to a certain 18th Century playwright. To the uninitiated, his books are dense compilations of brief entries whose utility is anything but clear. But to students and other scholars, these are invaluable references. Professor Glick, whose scholarly interests cover a wide range of topics and ideas, has composed a similar bibliography of references to the work of Charles Darwin. Many of the entries are very short- for instance, under the entry for Gustav Flaubert, we have "Darwin. The fellow who says we're sprung from monkeys." Some go on for a few pages, like Engles' invocation of Darwin to explain the inevitability of Marx, or Alfred Marshall's page and a half entry, in which he relates Darwin to the ideas of Adam Smith, and compares specialization (in the economic sense) to biological differentiation.

In other words, this is not the sort of popular exposition that the title might suggest to the casual browser, not is it necessarily the sort of book you might idly leaf through looking for interesting reading- though a biologist or historian might do just that. It's really more of a volume for specialists, researchers and students looking for a single reference that would lead them to original works. For the Darwin specialist, it's a godsend. Although I don't fall into that category, I am an amateur student of history, and particularly the history of science and technology, and this book has already found a permanent place of my bookshelf.