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eBook Goat Song: A Seasonal Life, A Short History of Herding, and the Art of Making Cheese download

by Brad Kessler

eBook Goat Song: A Seasonal Life, A Short History of Herding, and the Art of Making Cheese download ISBN: 1416560998
Author: Brad Kessler
Publisher: Scribner; First Edition edition (June 23, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1227 kb
Fb2: 1833 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mbr docx azw lrf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Professionals and Academics

His other books include Lick Creek and The Woodcutter’s Christmas

The Wall Street Journal. The writing is so beautiful you want to reread sentences to savor i. -San Francisco Chronicle. His other books include Lick Creek and The Woodcutter’s Christmas. He is the recipient of a Whiting Writers’ Award, a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, and the Rome Prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters.

In fact, I would recommend it to anyone with an interest in etymology - agricultural etymology, sure, but the examples are so far reaching and permeating that I think they would be of interest to anyone.

This is the summary of Goat Song: A Seasonal Life, A Short .

This is the summary of Goat Song: A Seasonal Life, A Short History of Herding, and the Art of Making Cheese by Brad Kessler. How Great Goat Cheese Is Made - Продолжительность: 3:29 Blue Apron Recommended for you. 3:29. Two Years Alone in the Wilderness Escape the City to Build Off Grid Log Cabin - Продолжительность: 1:31:40 My Self Reliance Recommended for you. 1:31:40.

In poetic, reverent detail, Brad Kessler explores our ancient relationship to the land and our gradual alienation from the .

As Kessler begins to live the life of a herder, he encounters the pastoral roots of so many aspects of Western culture?how our diet, our alphabet, our religions, poetry, and economy all grew out of a pastoralist setting, a life lived among hoofed animals. com/?book 1416561005 Same great deal.

Goat Song is an American pastoral. But Kessler does not proselytize. He grows to love living with goats, as he strives to make delicious cheeses. It opens with the author, novelist Brad Kessler, moving away from society (New York City) and toward nature (a seventy-five-acre Vermont farm) and chronicles an experiment in agrarian living. It is an engrossing memoir, revealing how animal husbandry tends to the herder’s soul as well as to livestock. This seems to be a genuine revelation, reason alone to write a book.

Goats, Goatherds, Goat cheese. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Delaware County District Library (Ohio).

In his transformation from staunch urbanite to countrified goat farmer, Kessler explores the rustic roots of many aspects of Western culture, and how diet, alphabet, religions, and economy all grew out of a pastoral setting. 15 people like this topic

In his transformation from staunch urbanite to countrified goat farmer, Kessler explores the rustic roots of many aspects of Western culture, and how diet, alphabet, religions, and economy all grew out of a pastoral setting. 15 people like this topic.

Acclaimed novelist Brad Kessler lived in New York City but longed for a life on the . They decided to raise dairy goats and make cheese.

Acclaimed novelist Brad Kessler lived in New York City but longed for a life on the land where he could grow his own food. Kessler reflects on the history and literature of herding, and how our diet, our alphabet, our religions, poetry, and economy all grew out of a pastoralist milieu among hoofed animals.

Acclaimed novelist Brad Kessler lived in New York City but longed for a life on the land where he could grow his own . They decided to raise dairy goats and make cheese

Acclaimed novelist Brad Kessler lived in New York City but longed for a life on the land where he could grow his own food. Goat Song tells about what it's like to live intimately with animals who directly feed you. As Kessler begins to live the life of a herder - learning how to care for and breed and birth goats - he encounters the pastoral roots of so many aspects of Western culture.

A gorgeously observed chronicle about getting out of the city and living life on the land, in the tradition of Anne Dillard’s Pilgrim at Tinker Creek.

When acclaimed novelist Brad Kessler started to feel unsatisfied by his Manhattan lifestyle, he opted to tackle his issues of over-consumption and live a more eco-friendly life. He and his wife moved to a seventy-five acre goat farm in a small southern Vermont town, where they planned to make a living raising goats and making cheese. They never looked back. Now Kessler adds to his numerous accomplishments (winner of the 2007 Dayton Literary Peace Prize, 2007 Whiting Award for Writers of Exceptional Promise, and a 2008 Rome Prize) an array of cheeses that have already been highly praised by Artisanal, the renowned cheese restaurant in New York City.

In his transformation from staunch urbanite to countrified goat farmer, Kessler explores the rustic roots of so many aspects of Western culture, and how our diet, alphabet, reli- gions, poetry, and economy all grew out of a pastoral setting. With Goat Song, he demonstrates yet another dimension to his writing talent, showcasing his expertise as food writer, in a compelling, beautifully written account of living by nature’s rules.

Comments: (7)
Gavirgas
I signed up for a raw goat milk share, ordered equipment, and began reading blogs and taking notes because I want to make my own chevre. One of the blogs I read mentioned this book and I thought, "why not?"

There is something for everyone in this book. It's funny and strangely lyrical and haunting in turns. Perhaps the most remarkable thing is that Brad Kessler forces the reader to see the deep connections between the small farm and ancient, as well as more recent, pastoral poetry. He is well informed and did his research for the scope isn't just American or European, but looks at traditions from Africa and India. This is, in many ways, not just a tour de force of cheese making and dairy goats, but a tracing of the lineage, of song and being, between humans and goats.

What startled me, as a cradle Catholic, was Mr Kessler's obvious reverence for Thomas Merton and the local Monks in his area. And the connections between the crafting of cheese and monasticism is something that never dawned on me before. His delicate reverence is sincere and honest. Quite frankly he made me want to read Seven Storey Mountain again. Although Mr Kessler isn't a Catholic, he certainly captures that quiet longing that has always been a part of growing up Catholic for me.

For hours after I finished it, I was mulling the history of cheese, the Old Testament, nomads and monasticism, poetry and liturgy, and how all these intersect on the amazing goat.

At any rate, this is the perfect read for a lazy Sunday afternoon. Brad Kessler takes you into a year with goats, and we're all better people (and better informed) for having read this!
Nenayally
Every now and then you pick up a random book that just sucks you in whole cloth. A book that is so sweet, so deep, so real, so beautifully written, that it becomes an instant favorite that you can't wait to tall all of your friends about.

This book is that kind of book. Read it. It will take you away. You are welcome.
Darkshaper
I've read this book countless times, yet each time I learn something new -- and you will too. It's a perfect weekend read, coffee table conversation piece, or even a gift for an outdoorsman friend.

Mr. Kessler perfectly blends anecdotes of his goats' daily lives with a history of goat-herding, all with a sacred reverence for the animal that has sustained humanity for centuries.

Kessler describes the behavior, nuances, and personalities of his goats so thoroughly that by the end of the story you'll know them better than you know the author himself. You'll want to meet the goats. And you'll be introduced to the alluring mystery that Kessler uncovers by being a goat-herd -- as he learns and anticipates his animals' needs as closely as if they were his friends while enjoying their quiet companionship on walks through his land, he becomes increasingly more in touch with his own inner person.

You'll laugh admiring the goats' playful silliness, turn away in disgust at their sexual habits, watch in awe as a mother births her kid, bite your fingernails as coyotes menacingly threaten the herd, and cry through a goat's illness.

Yet after you're through, you'll emerge with a newfound respect for the animal, a longing for days long past when goats were more fully integrated into our ancestors' lives, and -- as I said in the title -- will likely want a herd of goats all your own.

You'll want to taste fresh goat's milk, gain a palate for the nuances of fresh goat cheese (the flavor changes based on a goat's diet and the season during which the milk was produced), and run to the store to purchase every variety of goat cheese your local market carries.

This book is perfect for the gentleman farmer, the weekend gardener longing for a hobby farm, the naturalist, the raw milk advocate, a gourmet foodie, or even just a lover of memoirs.

The storytelling is superb (Kessler typically writes fiction), but what makes this book even more difficult to put down is the nuggets of goat-related facts, history, and trivia that he intersperses throughout the book that will both impress and amuse you.

I cannot recommend this book enough, and even my lengthy review of what has now become one of my top five books cannot do it justice. Simply do yourself a favor, and order a copy of Brad Kessler's masterpiece today.
fire dancer
Kessler's writing is simply beautiful; the book both tells the story of the goat song and is, itself, a song dedicated to goats. He describes the connection with nature, history, and yourself that raising goats provides, noting that throughout time, goats have been the subjects of many legends and stories, always "helping humans or leading them to unexpected places."

"If you follow living beings assiduously in the field, or through the lens of a microscope," writes Kessler, "they lead you to an understanding of their lives, and all life. They usher you into a kind of Eden."

Simply beautiful.

There were just a *few* tangents I could have done without in the book, parts I thought started to veer quite widely from where I wanted the book to go, but I can appreciate the symbolism of this as herding certainly lends itself to meandering.

I get an overwhelming sensation of calm just writing about this book, and so I highly recommend Goat Song to goat lovers as well as to anyone who enjoys the concept of a simpler life, being in Thoreau-like tune with nature, and/or meditation.
Kulalas
This is a must read for anyone who knows nothing of, yet is interested, in animal husbandry. It was a recommend read by a local radio program's book show. It was a gift for my boyfriend who thought he might want to make cheese in his retirement. He has actually started making a list of some very unique words used in this book to research and expand his vocabulary. And it was a fascinating and eye opening read. It might tell you more than you wish to know. But that's the reality of raising animals.