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by Graham Greene

eBook A Sort of Life (Slightly Foxed Editions) download ISBN: 1906562202
Author: Graham Greene
Publisher: Slightly Foxed Limited (September 6, 2010)
Pages: 224
ePub: 1891 kb
Fb2: 1478 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: doc txt azw mobi
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Memoirs

Greene describes his early published writing -a book of poems and four novels - as depressingly unsuccessful and he pins down the reason for this.

was in the nature of a psychoanalysis  . Greene describes his early published writing -a book of poems and four novels - as depressingly unsuccessful and he pins down the reason for this.

Published September 6th 2010 by Slightly Foxed Limited. Hardcover, 224 pages. A Sort Of Life (ebook). Published March 22nd 2011 by Vintage Digital.

Such candour - from one of literature's Greats. Graham Greene (1904-1991)calls his autobiography 'A sort of life', because he says such writing is 'selective'

Such candour - from one of literature's Greats. Graham Greene (1904-1991)calls his autobiography 'A sort of life', because he says such writing is 'selective'. Beginning with his earliest memory in his English village of Berkamstead, 'sitting in a pram at the top of a hill with a dead dog lying at my feet'he trawls through the significant milestones of his life always reminding his reader of the uncertainty of what is 'genuinely remembered'. Family life was lukewarm.

In A Sort of Life Greene recalls schooldays and Oxford, adolescent encounters with psychoanalysis and . Graham Greene was born in 1904

In A Sort of Life Greene recalls schooldays and Oxford, adolescent encounters with psychoanalysis and Russian roulette, his marriage and conversion to Catholicism, and how he rashly resigned from The Times when his first novel, The Man Within was published in 1929. A Sort of Life reveals, brilliantly and compellingly, a life lived and an art obsessed by ‘the dangerous edge of things’. Graham Greene was born in 1904.

Slightly Foxed is a perfect readers’ periodical and every issue is a jo. Slightly Foxed introduces its readers to books that are no longer new and fashionable but have lasting appeal.

Slightly Foxed is a perfect readers’ periodical and every issue is a joy. In its pages, books you don’t yet know come to light and books you already love come to life. Adam Foulds The independent-minded literery magazine that combines good looks, good writing and a personal approach.

Graham Greene's 'long journey through time' began in 1904, when he was born into a tribe of Greenes based in Berkhamstead at the public school where his father was headmaster. In A Sort of Life Greene recalls schooldays and Oxford, adolescent encounters with psychoanalysis and Russian roulette, his marriage and conversion to Catholicism, and how he rashly resigned from The Times when his first novel, The Man Within was published in 1929.

A Sort of Life is the first volume of autobiography by British novelist Graham Greene, first published in 1971.

Henry Graham Greene OM CH (2 October 1904 – 3 April 1991), better known by his pen name Graham Greene, was an English novelist regarded by many as one of the leading English novelists of the 20th century. Combining literary acclaim with widespread popularity, Greene acquired a reputation early in his lifetime as a major writer, both of serious Catholic novels, and of thrillers (or "entertainments" as he termed them). He was shortlisted, in 1966 and 1967, for the Nobel Prize for Literature

Octavo, original cloth. Fine in a near fine dust jacket

Octavo, original cloth. Fine in a near fine dust jacket. Jacket design by Michael. His memoirs have been criticized for being oddly impersonal and for brushing over his marriage and his conversion to Catholicism, especially as his faith was to become a powerful motif in many of his novels.

The current Greene book, A Sort of Life -which comes out this week -is his autobiography up to age 2. For a book that is going to be slightly brooding I think one wants to prepare by a slow movement at the beginning. For depressed moods it becomes very unpleasant writing.

The current Greene book, A Sort of Life -which comes out this week -is his autobiography up to age 27. There was a certain amount of material in manuscript, said the autobiographer, because about 20 years ago during a period of nervous depression I went to a psychiatrist, and he told me to start writing out my memories of childhood. In Mr. Greene's novels, good and evil appear to be strong motive forces; he has been accused of obsession with evil at the expense of concern with good.

Comments: (7)
Doukasa
Such candour - from one of literature's Greats.Graham Greene (1904-1991)calls his autobiography 'A sort of life', because he says such writing is 'selective'. Beginning with his earliest memory in his English village of Berkamstead, 'sitting in a pram at the top of a hill with a dead dog lying at my feet'he trawls through the significant milestones of his life always reminding his reader of the uncertainty of what is 'genuinely remembered'. Family life was lukewarm. His father ' as a headmaster he was even more distant than our aloof mother'.It has such a ring of truth and sincerity -a touch of the commonplace of which most of our lives are made up. Credible and accessible to the reader with a hint of philosophy. He states that 'early reading has more influence on conduct thant any religious teaching'.His early brush with censorship and the Catholic Church when he was summoned by Cardinal Griffin to Westminster about his novel'The Power and the Glory'he relates with a degree of sangfroid and his view was later vindicated when Pope Paul told him of his joy in reading the same work.Recounting his early lustful experiences he declares ,'Morality comes with the sad wisdom of age when the sense of curiousity had withered'.And on his alcoholic bouts he says 'For nearly one term I went to bed drunk every night..'No exaggeration, no hyperbole.He instils a frisson of fear into the heart when he describes entry into the adult world of work'Nothing is quite as ominous as when formal education ends and the moment arrives to find employment..' Some life experiences are simply common to humankind.Worth reading for its authenticy and common touch.
Dianaghma
In this review I am looking for causality. What factors contributed to Graham Greene's greatness? The potpourri that follows is admitedly subjective. Graham grew up in Berkhamsted, England where his father was a head-master at the school. The father was somewhat a failure because he had wanted to become a barrister, and this may have had a shaping effect on Graham. In many ways Graham was a typical youth. For example, he liked toy forts and lead soldiers and collected stamps and coins. But in other ways he was different, and his father must have sensed this because Graham was placed in the transference school of psychotherapy for many years. Graham got along well and was very happy working with his therapist. Graham read many books, and some influenced his later choices for travel and writing. "King Solomon's Mines" influenced his decision to trek across Liberia, and "Montezuma's Daughter" affected his interests in and travel to Mexico. But "The Maneaters of Tsavo" prejudiced him against East Africa for years or until the Mau-Mau Rebellion. This was poor judgment because two male lions (brothers) halted the construction of the Uganda Railroad by terrorizing hundreds of Indian coolies and devouring some 100. The lions almost harvested the Great White Hunter by entering a railroad coach where the the GWH had secreted himself hoping to bag the lions (he did). Graham appears to have possessed a strange attitude toward animals--there were certainly lots of them in Liberia, Mexico, Sierra Leone, and Viet Nam. But Graham had a lifelong pathological fear of moths, and he reveals that while stationed in Sierra Leone he counted 100 flies he had killed. Dreams were very important to Graham, and he had rather frequent fainting spells, leading to a diagnosis of epilepsy, later apparently negated. Graham experienced bullying at a boarding school. He was on the verge of a nervous breakdown and often thought of suicide. He determined to write and to become somebody. Off to Oxford and greater familiarity with alcohol--he was often drunk from dawn until dusk. Alcohol was frequently mentioned in many of his novels. There was a great deal of mental illness on both sides of his family, and he began to show manic-depressive symptoms. He had a morbid fear of boredom that contributed to his travels. He drifted into some useless jobs, but began to write novels, one published. He got a job with The Times and was very happy there. He met his future wife, Vivien through her criticizing one of his film reveiws. Vivien was a Roman Catholic, and this undoubtedly contributed to his often emphasized conversion. Catholicism entered strongly into some of his novels as all GG readers know. He continued to write novels, some accepted for publication, some rejected. "The Man Within," usually considered his first published novel was actually his third. Strangely, his earlier novels sold more copies than did many of his later ones. Nevertheless, Graham had feelings of failure and of lurking madness accompanied by swelling of the brain. The autobiography ends with a jump of 20 years onto the future and his smoking opium with friends in Bangkok. "The smell of opium is more agreeable than the smell of success."
Shakar
You have to be a fan of mid-century English authors to like Greene's style of writing and I guess that wouldn't be me. At the risk of sounding like Steve Martin doing a comedy bit, Greene just uses too many words! Acutally, what I am saying is that the writing style is "thick" with menutiae which makes it slow and heavy reading. I am a fan of memoirs and biographies - that is practially all I read -- and there are memoirs in which the author can tell you about his life in a way that informs your own -- and then there are memoirs that -- well, they just bore you. Halfway through this one I found myself saying, "who cares?" I know. I know. It takes alot to be critical of Greene -- but then, for what they are worth, these are only my opinions.
lacki
Book exactly as described. A+++