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eBook TORTURED: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib and the Photographs that Shocked the World download

by Gary S Winkler

eBook TORTURED: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib and the Photographs that Shocked the World download ISBN: 0578023709
Author: Gary S Winkler
Publisher: Bad Apple Books, LLC (May 1, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 268
ePub: 1159 kb
Fb2: 1329 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: docx lrf lrf doc
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

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While I found Gary Wilder's book to be both interesting and informative; I also found it a little too subjective and coddling at times.

Lynndie england, abu Ghraib and the Photographs that shocked th. .

book by Gary S. Winkler. Tortured : Lynndie england, abu Ghraib and the Photographs that shocked the World.

TORTURED: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib and the Photographs that Shocked the World

TORTURED: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib and the Photographs that Shocked the World. In addition to revealing the young Army Reservist's thoughts and feelings about her role in the abuse, the questionable conduct of the war and the Bush-era torture policies that contributed to the culture of abuse that came to exist at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. When those photographs were first published almost a decade ago, images showed the world horrific instances of abuse and torture that even today remains one of the biggest scars to mar the Iraq War and occupation during its nearly nine-year-long duration. Eleven US troops were convicted for their conduct there.

While several books have been written about Abu Ghraib and the prisoner abuses that took place during the Iraq War, to date none of the .

That is, until now. In this book, TORTURED: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib and the Photographs that Shocked the World - LYNNDIE ENGLAND'S ONLY AUTHORIZED BIOGRAPHY - author Gary Winkler tells all.

Download PDF book format. 250 p. : ill. ;, 25 cm. Personal Name: England, Lynndie. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Tortured : Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib, and the photographs that shocked the world Gary S. Book's title: Tortured : Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib, and the photographs that shocked the world Gary S. Library of Congress Control Number: 2010290765. Corporate Name: United States. Corporate Name: Abu Ghraib Prison.

She returned to her hometown of Fort Ashby, West Virginia, where she stayed with friends and family while working with author Gary Winkler on her authorized biography, "Tortured: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib And The Photographs That Shocked The World

She returned to her hometown of Fort Ashby, West Virginia, where she stayed with friends and family while working with author Gary Winkler on her authorized biography, "Tortured: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib And The Photographs That Shocked The World. England hoped the book would repair the damage to her reputation.

Lynndie England, a US Army reservist, was shown clutching another inmate via a.

Lynndie England, a US Army reservist, was shown clutching another inmate via a strap made to appear like a dog leash. England, who was given a three-year jail term and a dishonourable discharge for her actions, would subsequently describe herself as the face of the prisoner abuse scandal. Abu Ghraib quickly became a byword for ­torture, but even before the 2003 invasion the ­prison had a nefarious reputation. As Abu Ghraib had become the symbol of the abuse the world over, this handful of people were willing to become the human face of a resistance, to stand up against the kind of cruelty that had been imposed upon them years before.

The book, by Gary S. Winkler, is Tortured: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib and the Photographs That Shocked the World. Members of the Library of Congress Professional Association, the employee group holding the talk, learned that the event had been canceled in an e-mail message from the group’s president, Angela Kinney. Continue reading the main story. We’re interested in your feedback on this page

The book, released in June, is called "Tortured: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib and the Photographs That Shocked the World. England, 26, of Fort Ashby, has said she hopes it will help people understand she had a limited role in the mistreatment of detainees at the Iraqi prison in 2004.

The book, released in June, is called "Tortured: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib and the Photographs That Shocked the World. The photographs show her holding a restraint around a man's neck, and giving a thumbs-up and pointing at the genitals of naked, hooded men, a cigarette dangling from her mouth.

While several books have been written about Abu Ghraib and the prisoner abuses that took place during the Iraq War, to date none of the key players in this drama have given a full account of what transpired at the prison between October and December of 2003. That is, until now. In this book, TORTURED: Lynndie England, Abu Ghraib and the Photographs that Shocked the World - LYNNDIE ENGLAND'S ONLY AUTHORIZED BIOGRAPHY - author Gary Winkler tells all. In addition to revealing the young Army Reservist's thoughts and feelings about her role in the abuse, the author delves deeper into England's twisted relationship with Corporal Charles Graner, the questionable conduct of the war and the Bush-era torture policies that contributed to the culture of abuse that came to exist at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.
Comments: (7)
Morad
Honestly, years ago, one of the last things I wanted to do was read about the "face" of the Abu Ghraib scandal. The media, after all, had sufficiently done its typical over-the-top saturation coverage of the issue and I felt I really didn't need any more information on the topic. Compounding my initial sentiment was the disgust I felt over the mere possibility that a few irresponsible idiots and a camera may have augmented an already incendiary situation in Iraq that resulted in unnecessary American deaths. However, now that several years have passed and the "dust" has somewhat "settled" since the Abu Ghraib scandal was first covered, I was more receptive to read about one the scandal's major players ... the "leash girl" herself, Lynndie England.

I picked up Gary Winkler's book, "Tortured" in an effort to learn more about the rationale, if not the excuses, of the soldier that became synonymous with Abu Ghraib. The media's angle in reporting the issue seemed more politically motivated than honest overview of events. Although Winkler does provide an introspective look at the life of Lynndie England, the book left me with mixed feelings, the most prominent is that England is portrayed as a victim at almost every step of her life. Additionally, there are two points the reader may want to know beforehand: First, the book is the only "authorized biography of Lynndie England" and second, the author is known for his works on West Virginian culture (Lynndie England is from West Virginia). I felt these two points factored in dictating the tone of the book.

"Tortured" teases the reader by starting with England being detained by the military in Iraq for undisclosed reasons before taking us back to the very beginning, England's childhood in West Virginia. From the start, Winkler preps the reader with a variety of victim-related issues that could be used to justify her behavior, whether it be her family's financial despair, a hard-living, deep-woods country environment or early childhood developmental issues that she eventually overcame in high school. This section of the book is rather interesting, as we get a glimpse of Lynndie England outside the military, an innocent country girl striving to be the first in her family to go to college. The desire to be a meteorologist and the college degree it would require leads England to enlist in the US Army ... a patriotic decision with a GI Bill benefit. Portrayed as being young, naïve and somewhat gullible, her life seems rather innocent and predictable to a degree. Enter Charles Graner, the ex-Marine reservist who is portrayed as the devil-in-disguise from the moment he is introduced in the book. Almost immediately, Winkler portrays England as prey to the predatory Graner who snakesg her away from the hometown boy she married prior to active duty. What follows are a series of bad-behavior incidents and the start of England's disdain for the military's rules of conduct. Before long, the "innocent" West Virginian appears to be spellbound by Graner who can apparently coax her into anything ... not that she was an unwilling accomplice.

Upon deploying to Iraq as part of an MP detachment assigned to guard prisoners, we get a continued dose of England's and Graner's improper conduct and how it meshes with the military's vague policy on handling non-combatant prisoners. It is at this point, I realized the not-so-subtle victimization of Lynndie England at the hands of the US Government. Although the book does not shy away from describing the actions associated with the infamous photos of Abu Ghraib, they are tempered with England's rationale/excuses and the author's steady injection of questionable US foreign policy ... all of which seem to indicate the abuse of prisoners was almost unavoidable. I do give credit to the author for including the incriminating photos which allows the reader to see the delight on England's face while participating in the prisoner abuse. The pictures alone seem to contradict her somber attempt to explain the situation. But, by providing the visual evidence of the abuse with England's explanation, the author allows the reader to ultimately decide which speaks more of the truth ... the Lynndie England in the photos or the Lynndie England facing the consequences of those photos.

The last third of the book is devoted to Lynndie England's fate, personally and professionally. It is not difficult for the reader to empathize with the difficulties she faces at this particular moment: the burden of carrying and giving birth to a child fathered by an indifferent Charles Graner, discovering Graner's infidelity with a fellow soldier/friend, the death of a beloved aunt, the hate mail received by she and her family, her parents' divorce, the likelihood of serving a prison sentence as the mother of an infant child and being booted from the Army. Wilder, however, does not paint England to be a victim this time ... she portrayed as a survivor.

Whether right or wrong, Lynndie England became the "face" of Abu Ghraib even though others share as much, if not more of the blame. While I found Gary Wilder's book to be both interesting and informative; I also found it a little too subjective and coddling at times. I feel Wilder paints England to be a victim of circumstance throughout the book (developmental issues as a child, blind follower to Charles Graner, the Bush Administration's strategy in Iraq, etc.) and the reader is somewhat prodded to focus on other people and issues as the reason for her behavior in Iraq. While the book is not an attempt to exonerate Lynndie England's actions it appears to be an attempt to garner empathy, if not sympathy for her. Is England a victim or a deviant? While Wilder's words may support one side, the pictures themselves support the other ... ultimately it is up to the reader to decide.
Whitemaster
Interesting story. Military does indeed have places for followers.
Auridora
I thought that this was a heartfelt book from a young woman who was trying to make sense of disasterous events which she participated in. It is never right nor is there ever any justification for torture or abusing any other human or animal and I am sure that the people that were tortured in Abu Ghraib will never rightly forget or perhaps forgive their tormentors. I think it was right that Ms England went to prison, but there were many others who were far higher up who knew of the abuse and did nothing. People who enabled it to happen who have never been brought to justice.

I was interested to hear what Lynndie England had to say for herself as there are always twos sides to each story. Having read the book, I have a lot of sympathy for the US soliders who were untrained for the roles that they had, unsupervised, with no management intervention and doing their jobs under very difficult circumstances - ie, the unsanitary conditions, soliders working very long hours without breaks (12 hours shifts for 40 days in one case) and being bombed pretty much all the time. Sadly I understand that there have been many cases of abuse , not just from US soliders but British as well which makes me feel that it was systemic rather than the responsibility of 'a few bad apples'.

The lack of accountability and responsibility for what was happening allowed the circumstances for appauling abuse. A very good and easy to read book and I read it along side 'the Lucifer Effect' by Philip Zimbardo who comments on the Abu Ghraib abuses from a pyschological standpoint.
MOQ
There are two sides to every story. This book gives you the chance to examine another side. The book provided too many circumstances for it not to be true. I recommend anyone to read with an open mind. It is a very good book, well written and I highly recommend.
Ffel
There were others who walked a mile in her shoes and chose to report it all to higher-ups; she chose not to.
Peras
Wow...

I just cannot say more! In 2004-2205, this poor girl and her buds did things that lead to the deaths of American Soldiers and countless Iraqis. I really feel sorry for her now after reading this. She was let down. After all, one needs to have good leadership to know that mistreating human beings is completely wrong. Then again, I suppose when you have an IQ that prevents you from effectively making oatmeal in the morning, you need it. Boy, if only there was some moral guiding force to have prevented this! This is a GREAT BIO! I cannot wait for England's sequel already in the works! Look for it this fall, "Trailer Parks, Fry Cookin' and the Quest for More Money!" Also, check out Calley's bio, "My Massacre...Is butchery all that wrong?"
Munigrinn
Gary Winkler does a more than excellent and objective job writing about Lynndie England and her life--before and after her experience at Abu Ghraib. I would recommend everyone read this book and form your own opinions about Lynndie and what happened from her viewpoint at Abu Ghraib. After viewing an interview with the BBC August 13 this past week, it is obvious that Lynndie continues to be manipulated by those who do not have best interests at heart. Read the book and give her a chance. Maybe she will escape the need to be manipulated by other people eventually. She's still young and there's hope.
Most of us had formed an opinion of our military's few 'bad apples' based on media coverage. This writer's research reveals new information about the conditions inside the Iraqi War and specifically about the Abu Ghraib prison scandal. This book sheds light on Ms. England's early life and how she ends up in Iraq. But, how on earth can this shy homey girl evolve into something indescribable? It's good to read what is likely the only factual accounting of this scandal. The family photos added to the drama. It may or may not change your opinion. My hat's off to the writer for his perseverance.