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eBook George H. W. Bush: The American Presidents Series: The 41st President, 1989-1993 download

by Timothy Naftali,Patrick Frederic

eBook George H. W. Bush: The American Presidents Series: The 41st President, 1989-1993 download ISBN: 1427202206
Author: Timothy Naftali,Patrick Frederic
Publisher: Macmillan Audio; Unabridged edition (December 10, 2007)
Language: English
ePub: 1533 kb
Fb2: 1710 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: mobi lrf txt lrf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

George H. W. Bush, 41st President of the United States, is our most under-rated of recent presidents. This is the first book of The American Presidents series I have read, so I am assuming all the other books follow a similar formula

George H. This is not merely the author’s opinion, but the opinion of historians who, in a recent poll, rated Bush 21st among presidents-middling rank. This is the first book of The American Presidents series I have read, so I am assuming all the other books follow a similar formula. It may be years, or decades, before the definitive George H. Bush biography is written, if ever. Until then, this book is an enjoyable weekend read.

The book is George H. Bush wrote no memoir about his life or presidency. The American Presidents series is a great set of survey biographies of our presidents

The book is George H. This biography is part of The American Presidents Series. Bush had been Reagan’s Vice President. In modern times very few V. s have been successful in being elected president. The American Presidents series is a great set of survey biographies of our presidents. Some are better than others, but I am beginning to feel that the surveys are just to darned short for a really good interpretation of any president's life. The author makes a point in the book about Bush's political support (and indeed a fair assessment in my opinion): his support was as shallow as it was broad.

George Bush was a throwback to a different era. A patrician figure not known for eloquence, Bush dismissed ideology as "the vision thing. Yet, as Timothy Naftali argues, no one of his generation was better prepared for the challenges facing the United States as the Cold War ended. Bush wisely encouraged the liberalization of the Soviet system and skillfully orchestrated the reunification of Germany. And following Iraq's invasion of Kuwait in 1990, he united the global community to defeat Saddam Hussein.

George H. Bush: The American Presidents Series: The 41st President, 1989-1993. And yet, as Timothy Naftali argues, there was no person of his generation better prepared for the challenges facing the United States as the Cold War ended. Written by Timothy Naftali. Narrated by Patrick Frederic. Bush brilliantly shepherded Russian reformers through the liberalization of their socialist system and skillfully orchestrated the reunification of Germany.

This Author: Timothy Naftali. This Narrator: Patrick Frederic. The 41st President, 1989-1993. People Who Liked George H. Bush: The American Presidents Series Also Liked These Free Titles

This Author: Timothy Naftali. This Publisher: Macmillan Audio. George H. Bush: The American Presidents Series. Bush: The American Presidents Series Also Liked These Free Titles

Читает Patrick Frederic

Читает Patrick Frederic. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. George Bush was a throwback to a different era. A patrician figure not known for his eloquence, Bush readily dismissed ideology as "the vision thing. Yet, as Timothy Naftali argues, there was no person of his generation better prepared for the challenges facing the United States as the Cold War ended. Bush wisely shepherded Soviet reformers through the liberalization of their system and skillfully orchestrated the reunification of Germany. And following the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990, he united the global community to defeat Saddam Hussein.

The American Presidents Series: The 41st President, 1989-1993. Patrick Frederic has narrated many audiobooks, including James McManus' Physical, Max Barry's Jennifer Government, and Timothy Naftali's George H. The American Presidents. Timothy Naftali; Read by Patrick Frederic. Frederic has also appeared in various films, including 200 Cigarettes, Another Bed, and The Big Easy. On stage, he has appeared in such shows as Perfect Crime, Measure for Measure, and Sex, Religion, Politics.

Written by Timothy Naftali, narrated by Patrick Frederic. The American President Series: The 41st President, 1989-1993. Narrated by: Patrick Frederic. Series: American Presidents, Book 41. Length: 7 hrs and 3 mins. Categories: Biographies & Memoirs, Political Figures. Bush The judicious statesman who won victories abroad but suffered defeat at home, George Bush . Bush The judicious statesman who won victories abroad but suffered defeat at home, George Bush was a throwback to a different era. Yet, as Naftali argues in his look at the 41st president, no one of his generation was better prepared for the challenges facing the . as the Cold War ended. About the Author: Timothy Naftali is the director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, having previously served as director of the Presidential Recordings Program at the University of Virginia.

The 41st President's greatest speeches from 1989-1993, including the national address on Iraq's invasion of Kuwait, his address to the nation on Panama's police action, and his speech at the end of the Gulf War. Star: George Bush. View production, box office, & company info. By the Numbers: The 2020 Golden Globes. Who has won the most Golden Globes? How many ties there have been in Golden Globes history? We counted those stats and more. Watch now. Related News. Woman Claims George .

George Bush was a throwback to a different era. A patrician figure not known for his eloquence, Bush readily dismissed ideology as "the vision thing." Yet, as Timothy Naftali argues, there was no person of his generation better prepared for the challenges facing the United States as the Cold War ended. Bush wisely shepherded Soviet reformers through the liberalization of their system and skillfully orchestrated the reunification of Germany. And following the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait in 1990, he united the global community to defeat Saddam Hussein. At home, Bush reasserted the principle of fiscal discipline after the excesses of the Reagan years. It was ultimately his political awkwardness that cost George Bush a second term. His toughest decisions widened fractures in the Republican Party, and with his party divided, Bush lost his bid for reelection in 1992. In a final irony, the conservatives who scorned him would return to power eight years later, under his son and namesake, with the result that the elder George Bush would see his reputation soar.
Comments: (7)
Kezan
George H. W. Bush, 41st President of the United States, is our most under-rated of recent presidents. This is not merely the author’s opinion, but the opinion of historians who, in a recent poll, rated Bush 21st among presidents—middling rank. His accomplishments, particularly in foreign affairs, would suggest otherwise. He skillfully judged the dissolution of the Soviet Union and bucked the advice of foreign policy hard-liners by not interfering, believing (correctly) the failed Soviet system would collapse under the weight of its massed ineptitude and release Eastern Bloc countries from its iron grip. He forged a coalition of some 30 nations to halt and repel the invasion of Kuwait by Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. And he intervened successfully in the arrest of Manuel Noriega, drug trafficker and corrupt dictator of Panama. Where Bush comes up short is with his management of the U.S. economy, which cost him a second term as president. I have not been an admirer of George H.W. Bush—until reading this book. The author Timothy Naftali is a story-teller of the first rank who emphasizes Bush’s intelligence, judgement and perseverance. If Bush had a failing, it was his modesty—an unwillingness to blow his own horn.

Running for president, Bush was tagged with being a wimp, which couldn’t have been further from the truth. In fact, he was a bonafide war hero. In World War II, as the youngest Air Force pilot stationed in the South Pacific, he flew 58 missions and made 126 carrier landings. On his 50th mission his plane was severely damaged by shrapnel. Displaying true grit under fire, he completed his bombing run before having to bail out. After his discharge from service in 1945, he attended Yale, then moved to Texas where he became a self-made millionaire in the oil business before the age of 40. After that, he focused on politics. He served two terms in the House of Representatives but lost twice running for the U.S. Senate. All the while he made friends with people in high places. President Richard Nixon appointed him Ambassador to the United Nations and then chairman of the Republican National Committee. President Gerald Ford appointed him Envoy to China and then Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. However, these were merely consolation prizes, after having been turned down by both Nixon and Ford as a potential running mates. In 1980, at long last, he got the nod, as Ronald Reagan’s running mate. He served under Reagan for two terms, before turning his attention to the prize he had wanted all along—the presidency. He was elected in 1988, as the Cold War was coming to end.

Bush exhibited what the author calls “unexpected greatness” in keeping the drama of Eastern Europe’s Revolution from cascading into a broader East-West crisis. Bush kept his head and refrained from inflammatory rhetoric. He avoided rubbing Moscow’s nose in the reality of its collapsing empire and went out of his way to engage America’s former enemy in the responsible management of the Cold War’s end, masterfully so in negotiating German reunification and the withdrawal of Soviet troops from central Europe. In the Middle East, meanwhile, Bush was masterful in building a coalition of nations against Saddam Hussein’s hostile invasion of Kuwait. Military action was swift, well-coordinated, and stunningly effective in driving out Iraq’s famed Republic Guard. Thanks to broad world support, the U.S. military actually had a cash surplus at the close of the war. Also, it was the U.S. military’s first victory since World War II.

Where Bush had trouble was in dealing with the slumping economy, and with a growing faction of doctrinaire conservatives who couldn’t see the forest for the trees in refusing to compromise with the leader of their own party. Led by Newt Gingrich, rather than supporting the president’s economic policies and thereby helping him get re-elected, they fought him and helped elect Bill Clinton instead. Writes the author: “Bush’s problem was that while he was held responsible for the financial mess left by Reagan, no one seemed to give him credit for trying to fix it.” The growing conservative movement led to the candidacy of Patrick Buchanan— who tried and failed to take the Republican Party’s nomination away from Bush—and to the candidacy of quirky independent candidate Ross Perot. As a result an impression was created that the nation lacked genuine leadership under President Bush. Partly to blame was his lack of charisma as a public speaker, and a voter base that had never been strong. Says the author: Bush’s support among voters "was as shallow as it was wide." As a leader, his effectiveness was in one-to-one conversations in the perennial “smoke-fill rooms” where decisions are made and consensus reached. On the campaign stump, however, his speeches lacked the passion that drives voters to the polls on election day. By the fall of the 1992, the economy was in recovery but Bush failed to get this message across. His campaign rhetoric was measured, reasonable, and calm, but out of touch with voter sentiments, while Clinton empathized with unhappy voters (“I feel your pain”), striking again and again at where Bush was weakest. “It’s the economy, stupid,” Clinton reminded his staffers. When it counted most, Bush would not get down and dirty as politicians often do when elections are closely contested, and it cost him dearly--a second term as president.
Marige
George H. W. Bush has the honor of the person who was president when I was born. As such, I took it upon myself to learn a little more about the world when I came into it.

This book is a brief overview of Bush the Elder's life. Even before he became president, Bush had served in numerous political positions. First a Congressman, Ambassador to the UN, Chairman of the RNC, Liaison to China, Director of Central Intelligence, and Vice President under Ronald Reagan, after a failed presidential run. Although the description of this period in Bush's life is rather summarized, one does get a view of how Bush's views changed, or changed by whatever circumstance required it to, over this period. Strangely enough throughout all of this, Bush still strives to be vice president. As noted in the book, no American politician had strived for the vice presidency so many times and lost. Bush's toughest task during his vice presidency came when the Iran-Contra scandal broke. He tactfully said he was out of the loop when he knew more than he admitted.

As 1988 loomed, Bush prepared for another run for the presidency. The book recalls key moments during the campaign such as Willie Horton, "read my lips," and Democratic nominee Michael Dukakis's blunder of being photographed in a tank. When the election finally came, Bush was probably still riding on Reagan's popularity and won with a comfortable margin.

Despite serving only one term (1989-1993), Bush was president during a world of change. Granted, Bush does not deserve very much credit for it. Had he not been in office the revolutions in Eastern Europe and the collapse of the Soviet Union probably still would have occurred. Still, Bush kept a watchful eye and met Gorbachev a few times.

As the author said, part of Bush's presidency was to clean up the mess Reagan had left him. There was the Savings and Loan crisis which required some big spending by the federal government to fix. This only worsened the deficit Bush had to deal with. Bush ended up doing something he knew was political suicide and ultimately decided to raise taxes thus breaking his major campaign promise.

Bush had more success in foreign policy. He ordered an invasion of Panama to depose Manuel Noriega, a former US ally gone bad. His greatest challenge came when Iraq, under Saddam Hussein, ordered an invasion and brutal occupation of neighboring Kuwait. During that period, stories went around of Iraqi soldiers killing babies and other atrocities. Some stories were outright falsehoods, but Bush took them to heart and no doubt played in part of his decision to use force against Iraq. After the air campaign and 100-hour ground war in early 1991, Iraqi forces had been expelled from Kuwait. Bush's approval rating shot up to 89% due to the swift victory and minimum American and coalition casualties. Although there was criticism at the time of the ultimate decision not to follow Saddam into Iraq and depose him.

Unfortunately for Bush, the high approval Americans gave him after the Gulf War did not last. The economy started to sag later in his term. His approval rating started to plummet. In 1992, he would lose reelection to Bill Clinton.

The final part of the book covers his post-presidency until the mid-2000s. He was not a very active ex-president. He wrote some books, gave some speeches, and parachuted out of a plane.

It may still be too early to fully judge the Bush, Sr. presidency. After all, the man is still alive. One's views on certain actions can change depending on later events. For example, although many people criticized his decision not to remove Saddam from power, during his son's presidency years later when another war in Iraq deposed him and led to a years long occupation, Bush, Sr. may have been right at the time.

Today Bush, Sr. is probably best remembered for his famous quote "Read my lips; no new taxes." But his presidency, and life, was much more than that.

This book did a decent job of summarizing major points in his life. It is not very detailed, though. This is the first book of The American Presidents series I have read, so I am assuming all the other books follow a similar formula. It may be years, or decades, before the definitive George H. W. Bush biography is written, if ever. Until then, this book is an enjoyable weekend read.