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eBook Lincoln's Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers' Home download

by Matthew Pinsker

eBook Lincoln's Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers' Home download ISBN: 0195162064
Author: Matthew Pinsker
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (September 4, 2003)
Language: English
Pages: 272
ePub: 1698 kb
Fb2: 1839 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: lrf lit lrf txt
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

In Lincoln's Sanctuary, historian Matthew Pinsker offers a fascinating portrait of Lincoln's stay in this cottage and tells the story of the president's remarkable growth as a national leader and a private man.

In Lincoln's Sanctuary, historian Matthew Pinsker offers a fascinating portrait of Lincoln's stay in this cottage and tells the story of the president's remarkable growth as a national leader and a private man. Lincoln lived at the Soldiers' Home for a quarter of his presidency, and for nearly half of the critical year of 1862, but most Americans (including many scholars) have not heard of the place

President Lincoln and Soldiers’ Home National Monument, sometimes shortened to President Lincoln's Cottage, is a national monument on the grounds of the Soldiers' Home.

President Lincoln and Soldiers’ Home National Monument, sometimes shortened to President Lincoln's Cottage, is a national monument on the grounds of the Soldiers' Home, known today as the Armed Forces Retirement Home. It is located near the Brookland. President Lincoln's Cottage was formerly known as Anderson Cottage.

Lincoln's Sanctuary book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Lincoln's Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers' Home as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Lincoln's Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers' Home as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In Lincoln's Sanctuary, historian Matthew Pinsker offers a fascinating . I was aware of this location, but this book brought to life many more details about. Lincoln lived at the Soldiers' Home for a quarter of his presidency, and for nearly half of the critical year of 1862, but most Americans (including many scholars) have not heard of the place.

Lincoln lived at the Soldiers Home for a quarter of his presidency, and for . Publisher: Gardners Books.

Lincoln lived at the Soldiers Home for a quarter of his presidency, and for nearly half of the critical year of 1862, but most Americans (including many scholars) have not heard of the place. In Lincolns Sanctuary, historian Matthew Pinsker offers a fascinating portrait of Lincolns stay in this cottage and tells the story of the presidents remarkable growth as a national leader and a private man. Lincoln lived at the Soldiers' Home for a quarter of his presidency, and for nearly half of the critical year of 1862, but most Americans (including many scholars) have not heard of the place

Chronology: Lincoln at the Solder's Home: p. 193-204. by. Pinsker, Matthew.

Chronology: Lincoln at the Solder's Home: p. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

After the heartbreaking death of his son Willie, Abraham Lincoln and his family fled the gloom that hung over the White. After the heartbreaking death of his son Willie, Abraham Lincoln and his family fled the gloom that hung over the White House, moving into a small cottage in Washington, . on the grounds of the Soldiers' Home, a residence for disabled military veterans.

Mr. Pinsker talked about his book, Lincoln’s Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers' Home, published by Oxford University Press, which depicts Lincoln and his family moving into a small cottage in Washington, . on the grounds of the Soldiers' Home, a residence for disabled military veterans

July 22, 2009 Matthew Pinsker, the Brian Pohanka Chair of Civil War History at Dickinson College, has published two books and numerous articles on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War era, including "Lincoln's Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers' Home" (2003)

July 22, 2009 Matthew Pinsker, the Brian Pohanka Chair of Civil War History at Dickinson College, has published two books and numerous articles on Abraham Lincoln and the Civil War era, including "Lincoln's Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers' Home" (2003). He has served as a visiting fellow at the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia and leads annual K-12 teacher workshops on the Underground Railroad for the National Endowment for the Humanities

After the heartbreaking death of his son Willie, Abraham Lincoln and his family fled the gloom that hung over the White House, moving into a small cottage in Washington, D.C., on the grounds of the Soldiers' Home, a residence for disabled military veterans. In Lincoln's Sanctuary, historian Matthew Pinsker offers a fascinating portrait of Lincoln's stay in this cottage and tells the story of the president's remarkable growth as a national leader and a private man. Lincoln lived at the Soldiers' Home for a quarter of his presidency, and for nearly half of the critical year of 1862, but most Americans (including many scholars) have not heard of the place. Indeed, this is the first volume to specifically connect this early "summer White House" to key wartime developments, including the Emancipation Proclamation, the firing of McClellan, the evolution of Lincoln's "Father Abraham" image, the election of 1864, and the assassination conspiracy. Through a series of striking vignettes, the reader discovers a more accessible Lincoln, demonstrating what one visitor to the Soldiers' Home described as his remarkable "elasticity of spirits." At his secluded cottage, the president complained to his closest aides, recited poetry to his friends, reconnected with his wife and family, conducted secret meetings with his political enemies, and narrowly avoided assassination attempts. Perhaps most important, he forged key friendships that helped renew his flagging spirits. The cottage became a refuge from the pressures of the White House, a place of tranquility where Lincoln could refresh his mind. Based on research in rarely tapped sources, especially the letters and memoirs of people who lived or worked at the Soldiers' Home, Lincoln's Sanctuary offers the unexpected--a completely fresh view of Abraham Lincoln--through the window of a place that helped shape his presidency.
Comments: (7)
Kazracage
Lincoln's Sanctuary was recommended to me by one of my favorite professors of history, Aaron Sheehan-Dean, whose field is the Civil War. I'm glad he recomended it.

Not only does Pinsker show us a side of Lincoln we don't often see -- away from the White House, though still beset with concerns for the fate of the country -- but he also gives us a lesson in how history is researched and written. All through the book are commentaries on difficulties in research, bits about how a historian selects (yes, we do select), organizes, and approaches his or her material. It's a wonderful course in boots-on-the-ground history.

Lovers of American history, followers of Abraham Lincoln, history students, Civil War buffs -- there is a great deal in this book for all.
Clandratha
I purchased this book because Amazon offered it at a minor discount - and I'm glad they did! It reads quickly and well, yet also provides decent insight into the Lincoln presidency and the role played by the Soldiers' Home, the presidential retreat. The book operates on many levels at once. It provides insight into the history of the Soldiers' Home, perspectives from the soldiers who guarded the Lincoln family there, and astute analysis of the president's day-to-day life during long summers at the Soldiers Home. The author does an excellent job of weighing and balancing historical information, artfully blending into the text his own assessment of different accounts' accuracy.

The most memorable part of this book is the incident of Fort Stevens, where Lincoln could not resist the temptation to view skirmishing between Union forces and Jubal Early's rebel raiders in July of 1864. The author separates legend from reality in this fascinating account of the only time a sitting American president has witnessed combat. The president's personal security was an ongoing theme vitally linked with his daily journeys between the Soldiers' Home and the White House. Pinsker describes numerous hair-raising incidents that suggested danger long before the fateful evening in Ford's Theater. Not a comprehensive biography of Lincoln, this title uses its limited theme to full advantage: by focusing on a narrow spectrum of the Lincoln story, he is able to bring the reader closer to the real man, his family, and his times than many other full-length biographies have ever done.
Arthunter
George Riggs had a cottage built in Washington City just a few miles north of the capital on a
hill in the peaceful countryside in 1842. Riggs was a prominent banker at the time and had a
desire for a retreat where he could escape the hustle and bustle of busy Washington. Today that
cottage is known as President Lincoln's Cottage at the Soldiers' Home Museum and has been
open to the public since 2008. Riggs sold the estate to the federal government in 1851 and a
home for veteran soldiers was founded. It was to be used as an asylum for disabled veterans. As
fate would have it there was to be more to the estate than its intended purpose. During the mid-
nineteenth century the grounds that contained the cottage were considered to be "in the country".
Today it is in the heart of northeast Washington, DC just off North Capital Street. President
Abraham Lincoln would spend three summers at the cottage and would pen the Emancipation
Proclamation while in residence there.
Lincoln entered the White House under the cloud of secession and war. Seven states had
seceded from the Union. He even had to sneak his way into his new residence after rumors of
assassination attempts surfaced in Baltimore. He needed a place to get away to before he even
walked through the front door of the White House. Lincoln's first year as president was an
eventful one and not in a good way. The Union Army had been repulsed at Bull Run just outside
Manassas Junction and military prospects did not look too favorable at that time. Lincoln spent
the first summer of his presidency at the White House busily dealing with military matters as
well as meeting with the throng of office seekers and would be profiteers. The following
February Lincoln lost his favorite son Willie to typhoid fever. The White House became a very
sad place for Lincoln's wife Mary and that summer and they decided to spend time away from
the office and move out to the country at the Soldier's Home. President and Mrs. Lincoln had
ridden out to the home during the first few months of his presidency and thought that it was an
ideal place to spend the humid Washington summers. They may also have been influenced by
former President Buchanan who spent time there.
Matthew Pinsker, an Associate Professor of History and Pohanka Chair of US Civil War
History at Dickinson College, has taken a detailed view of Lincolns time at the Soldier's Home
and has provided a lens through which the reader can view the personal and professional life of
the 16th President of the United States.
Lincolns Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldier's Home is a very well researched
monograph that makes excellent use of diaries and letters from those surrounding the former
President to give the reader a bird's eye view into life there during the summers of 1862, 1863,
and 1864.
Pinsker opens the book with an entry from Walt Whitman's Specimen Days where he describes
seeing the President on his way to the White House from the Soldiers Home in August 1863. "I
see the President almost every day. I saw him this morning about 8 ½ coming in to business."
(p. 1) Whitman said of the President "that there was a deep latent sadness evident in his eyes".
(p. 1) It was a common sight to see the President riding to and from his summer residence.
During the start of the summer of 1862 Lincoln would ride alone to and from the White House.
This changed with the possibility of an assault on the Capital by confederate forces whom up to
this point had been getting the better of the Union Army in the field. "At the end of the first
week of September, General James Wadsworth, the military governor of the District of
Columbia, dispatched two companies from a Pennsylvania Regiment to guard the cottage. He
also ordered members of the 11th New York Cavalry, which had been stationed in Washington,
to accompany the president on his daily commute." (p. 56) None of this particularly suited
Lincoln. He rather enjoyed the peace and solitude of the rides back and forth to the White House
but he was understanding of the military necessity of the new entourage. It is from this very
action that Pinsker gains the majority of his source material. The soldiers assigned to protect the
president proved to the very willing correspondents and through their letters home we can gain
insight to what Lincoln spent his time doing at the Soldier's home. Private Willard Cutter of the
150th Pennsylvania Regiment was one such soldier who wrote to his recently widowed mother
once a week. Cutter in particular makes an interesting source. His letters are heartfelt and he
displays no agenda in his writing. There are several other such sources that provide a treasure
trove of information for Pinsker to use while writing of the president and how he conducted his
daily personal and professional life at the Soldier's home.
There were conversations with high ranking officials as well as powerful civilians at the
Soldier's Home concerning leadership of the military and emancipation. Pinsker concludes that
Lincoln penned the Emancipation Proclamation while in residence at his summer retreat. There
are also tales of Lincoln's family life. Mary and their youngest son, Tad, spent a portion of
summers visiting Vermont and other northeastern states leaving the president alone. Lincoln
developed a relationship with his guards and became especially attached to Captain David
Derickson. Captain Derickson would share meals with the president as well as spend the night
at the cottage. Secretary of War Edwin Stanton also took up residence on the grounds of the
Soldier's home during summers. He, like Lincoln, had recently lost a child to illness and the two
developed a bond and a strong working relationship while away from the city. Lincoln would
also visit the contraband camp located near the Soldier's home. This may have helped evolve his
thinking of gradual vs. immediate emancipation. Mary Dines, an escaped slave, served as the
Lincolns cook during their summers and when interviewed after the war said that Lincoln had
visited the camps on several occasions and brought Mary on a few occasions. Dines said that
Lincoln was moved to tears during one visit where he witnessed the former slaves singing their
traditional songs.
In Lincolns Sanctuary: Abraham Lincoln and the Soldiers' Home Pinsker has focused
on a slice of Lincoln history that had yet to be fully reported. Considering that Lincoln spent
over a quarter of his presidency there it is surprising it has taken this long. Pinsker does a good
job of utilizing the letters and diaries from those who spent time at the soldiers home to give the
reader a glimpse into Lincoln's personal life and how he conducted his affairs. For those who
wondered how did Lincoln and Stanton become close this book lets us know that it was at the
Soldiers' home. Pinskers' prose is very easy to read and follows the Lincoln presidency
chronologically. He makes generous use of quotes from the soldiers who were charged with
protecting Lincoln and offers an insight into what they thought about their Commander in Chief.
He also makes use of diaries and letters from prominent people at the time and what their
impressions of working with Lincoln were. This book would be a welcome addition to the library
of any fan of Lincoln, civil war buff, or presidential historian.
Raelin
My gosh, a view into a part of Lincoln's life that is expertly told portraying the "human" Lincoln. During a Washington tour on the early 1970s to the Soldier's Home, we stopped near the Riggs Cottage. The tour guide said his talk but as I looked at an upstairs window. I swear I saw Mrs. Lincoln peak through the curtain at us. I still have that remembrance and feeling some 45 years later! Maybe she did?
Adorardana
This is an accurate account of Lincoln's summer cottage where he and his family stayed during the hot, humid DC summer months. My husband and I were able to visit the cottage and the book echoes the stories told by our very knowledgeable tour guide. It was interesting to actually walk the same grounds our 16th president walked. Reading the book I felt like I was right back there.