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eBook Doughboys on the Great War: How American Soldiers Viewed Their Military Experience (Modern War Studies) download

by Edward A. Gutièrrez

eBook Doughboys on the Great War: How American Soldiers Viewed Their Military Experience (Modern War Studies) download ISBN: 0700619909
Author: Edward A. Gutièrrez
Publisher: University Press of Kansas; 1 edition (September 19, 2014)
Language: English
Pages: 320
ePub: 1826 kb
Fb2: 1269 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: rtf mbr lrf mobi
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

Where many were simply asked for basic data, veterans from four states-Utah, Minnesota, Connecticut, and Virginia-were given questionnaires soliciting additional information and "remarks. In short, a hundred years later, the doughboy once more speaks in his own true voice. This is a 2014 book by a man who found and studied questionnaires that were sent to World War One soldiers in Utah, Minnesota, Connecticut, and Virginia right after they completed their service. Thousand of them filled out the forms and sent t hem back.

This was an interesting and somewhat informative book, though academically poor.

269 books - 6 voters. This was an interesting and somewhat informative book, though academically poor. It opens up to a great point of memory This was an interesting and somewhat informative book, though academically poor.

The short form doughs was also used by American soldiers on occasion . Their presence meant the allies would win if only because of numbers.

The short form doughs was also used by American soldiers on occasion during World War II. From the examples I’ve read it seems to refer specifically to American infantry, . in references by tank crewmen about supporting the doughs. Germany, on the other hand, suffered the same exhaustion that their counterparts did, and thought here we go again, but their numbers and attitudes showed the same strains of four years of fruitless fighting. 847 views · View 3 Upvoters.

Their Military Experience. By Edward A. Gutierrez. Lawrence, K5; University. Gutierrez spent fourteen years studying these surveys and found that data collected shortly after the soldiers returned from military service portrayed their feelings and motivations more accurately. Press of Kansas, 2014. By using this information, Doughboys on the Great War endeavored to explain "why individuals volunteer to go to war, and, if reality fails to match expectations. to ascertain the cause of these erroneous presumptions.

Modern War Studies Series. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2014 . Gutiérrez stresses that black veterans had to frame their answers in this positive light or incur the punishment of segregationist officials. My one major critique is the repetitive nature of some of the examples from the soldiers, and especially Gutiérrez’s oft-repeated argument that soldiers reprised the thoughts of Civil War General William Tecumseh Sherman that war is hell or Sherman was right (pp. 100, 105, 160).

Unlocking the ways soldiers view their military experiences comes with a host of methodological issues. Edward Gutierrez offers a key to unlocking this mystery. Wartime letters, often censored or self-censored, are not an adequate measure of men's morale and oftentimes focus on the temporal discomforts of life on campaign. More problematic are memoirs.

Doughboys on the Great War: How American Soldiers Viewed Their Military Experience Gutierrez Edward A. Eurospan 9780700624447 : It is impossible to reproduce the state of mind of the m. Drawing on these questionnaires, completed while memories were still fresh, this book presents a chorus of soldiers’ voices speaking directly of the expectations, motivations, and experiences as infantrymen on the Western Front in World War . hat was it like to kill or maim German soldiers? To see friends killed or maimed by the enemy?

Edward Gutiérrez has been studying thousands of soldiers.

Edward Gutiérrez has been studying thousands of soldiers. What he has discovered ought to make Americans proud, for, although the veterans returned with an understandable hatred of war- Sherman was right, wrote one, war is hell -they were almost universally proud of what they had done. Gutiérrez’s scholarship reflects a deep knowledge of the historical period. Anyone seeking to better understand the soldiers of the AEF will find this book invaluable.

The problem is that Gutierrez seemed to start this work with a preconceived dislike of the literary legacy of World War I and the metaphor of the "Lost Generation" as capturing the general American experience. While I appreciate a debunking of historic "just so" stories as much as the next person I have to admit that I don't trust Gutierrez's voice either and wonder whether he has his own secret agenda.

-Edward A. Gutiérrez, author of Doughboys on the Great War: How American Soldiers Viewed Their Military Experience.

"It is impossible to reproduce the state of mind of the men who waged war in 1917 and 1918," Edward Coffman wrote in The War to End All Wars. In Doughboys on the Great War the voices of thousands of servicemen say otherwise. The majority of soldiers from the American Expeditionary Forces returned from Europe in 1919. Where many were simply asked for basic data, veterans from four states—Utah, Minnesota, Connecticut, and Virginia—were given questionnaires soliciting additional information and "remarks." Drawing on these questionnaires, completed while memories were still fresh, this book presents a chorus of soldiers' voices speaking directly of the expectations, motivations, and experiences as infantrymen on the Western Front in World War I.What was it like to kill or maim German soldiers? To see friends killed or maimed by the enemy? To return home after experiencing such violence? Again and again, soldiers wrestle with questions like these, putting into words what only they can tell. They also reflect on why they volunteered, why they fought, what their training was, and how ill-prepared they were for what they found overseas. They describe how they interacted with the civilian populations in England and France, how they saw the rewards and frustrations of occupation duty when they desperately wanted to go home, and—perhaps most significantly—what it all added up to in the end. Together their responses create a vivid and nuanced group portrait of the soldiers who fought with the American Expeditionary Forces on the battlefields of Aisne-Marne, Argonne Forest, Belleau Wood, Chateau-Thierry, the Marne, Metz, Meuse-Argonne, St. Mihiel, Sedan, and Verdun during the First World War. The picture that emerges is often at odds with the popular notion of the disillusioned doughboy. Though hardened and harrowed by combat, the veteran heard here is for the most part proud of his service, service undertaken for duty, honor, and country. In short, a hundred years later, the doughboy once more speaks in his own true voice.
Comments: (7)
Blackbeard
Dr. Gutierrez’s excellent book “Doughboys on the Great War” serves as a counterweight to the widely accepted historical narrative about how the soldiers who fought in World War One viewed their military experience.

Focusing on the Doughboy and divided into six parts, the book takes the reader through the journey of pre-war influences, training, shipping over, and the “the ultimate test” with goal of trying to understand what made the men enlist, how they felt about their experiences during the war, and ultimately how their participation affected their lives after coming home. One of the most interesting aspects of the book is Gutierrez’s use of primary source material that had not previously been published or extensively studied. Specifically a collection of studies provided to Soldiers when they returned home from Europe asking them to describe their experiences during the war in their own words.

Pulling no punches, the book takes on heavyweights like Stein, Faulkner, and Hemmingway in the first few pages – laying out one of the thesis for the book, that the “Lost Generation” writers did not really understand the experienced of the common soldier engaged in combat, and that the term “Lost Generation” is in fact a misnomer.

Providing a rich background to the run up to war and the influences on the men to enlist, Doughboys goes beyond the obvious factors of British propaganda, Zimmerman, and The Lusitania - Gutierrez goes back further drawing a line to Civil War and General Sherman, then farther back to Victorian ideals of masculinity and knighthood and even further back connecting to Monroe and his pivot from Washington’s philosophy of staying out of the European wars.

Coming into the book with only a very limited knowledge on WWI, I found much of the material fascinating and surprising and it was most interesting to view all of this historical info through the lens of the soldiers own voices. I was particularly impressed with the insight into the devastating effect of disease and how it affected life in a US camp and the trip over. Other notable passages covered the general unpreparedness of the U.S. for War and the attitudes of the French and British Military leadership towards the importance of U.S. involvement.

Gutierrez argues that much of the lost generation ethos is a product of European feelings about the war and the soldiers who participated. While these ideas began in Europe they were spread across the United States by a cadre of well know writers who had in fact only limited (or in the case of Faulkner, none, he never even went to Europe he just lied about it) military experience. As we read through the book we start to develop a rich picture of who these men where and what they thought about their service from their own words. The men you meet stand in stark contrast to the stereotypical shattered member of The Lost Generation – left shell shocked by the senseless, anonymous violence. The soldiers highlighted tell a different story. They tell us they feel that in many ways you take from the war what you brought to it.

"Doughboys" is fascinating and well worth reading.
Dori
The author was a colleague of mine at the University of Hartford, and so I knew of his work. I was delighted to read his book, which I found to be very well written and very informative. It is an essential part of studying the often ignored role of Americans in WW I, a service that is overlooked by events of WW II.
This is fine, scholarly work, made vivid by contemporary accounts of soldiers' experiences both in the US and in France.
I am teaching a course called 'Americans Abroad', and our class put on a play which included a Doughboy and the writers who coined the term 'The Lost Generation'.
We used this book as a basis for the way Doughboys looked at the War and the very different, literary, viewpoint, of the writers.
Excellent.
Maximilianishe
Mr. Gutierrez, through his painstaking research, has given us a concise understanding of what it was like to be an American soldier in the Great War. The Doughboys' reflections and points of view -- based on the author's discovery of the soldiers' own handwritten replies to questionnaires about their wartime experiences -- are at last revealed to us a century after WW I began. While accurate historical facts, statistics and data are certainly part of this account, it is Mr. Gutierrez's superb writing, humanity, generosity of feeling and passion for his subject which makes this excellent book deserving of a readership beyond scholars, historians and military enthusiasts.
Gaudiker
This book is an excellent background of information on the build up of patriotic fervor for young men to enlist in the military. The author uses after action questionnaires of the veterans to illustrate the initial excitement of war and its eventual misery.
Adaly
Apparently a good book. Gave as a gift
Ieslyaenn
Amazing collection of personal experiences and reflections, a valuable history from those who lived it.
porosh
Reading the reactions of veterans of The Great War that have been stored and ignored was illuminating. What is unfortunate is that only FOUR states requested military service questionnaires. The author used the surveys from all four states, and he presented the chapters in a chronological order.
Great product, quick delivery.