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eBook Life Aboard the Crazy Polack: Memoirs of Family Tragedy, Heroism and Cold War Submarine Adventure download

by Phil Jaskoviak

eBook Life Aboard the Crazy Polack: Memoirs of Family Tragedy, Heroism and Cold War Submarine Adventure download ISBN: 1453774505
Author: Phil Jaskoviak
Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform; No Additional Printings Listed edition (February 16, 2011)
Language: English
Pages: 256
ePub: 1894 kb
Fb2: 1403 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mobi lit lrf docx
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

If you're looking for a book about submarine life, very little is written here.

Life Aboard the Crazy Polack? If you're looking for a book about submarine life, very little is written here. Much written of family history and 1960's social changes. Phil Jaskoviak finds that purpose while serving as a mechanic on the Crazy Polack in the . It is a story that offers hope to anybody that is trying to find meaning in their life. I wholeheartedly recommend Life Aboard the Crazy Polack.

How Phil ended up living on the front lines of the Cold War along with the amazing history of his parents are contained in the captivating story; "Life Aboard the Crazy Polack

How Phil ended up living on the front lines of the Cold War along with the amazing history of his parents are contained in the captivating story; "Life Aboard the Crazy Polack. Author Phil Jaskoviak was born in 1949 in a small Chicago suburb to a father of Polish immigrants and a man that had recently witnessed unbelievable atrocities of war. Phil’s mother was a Scottish immigrant, coal miners' daughter who, at a very young age, faced combined and unimaginable tragedies but despite the extreme adversity ended up as a model for survival.

book by Phil Jaskoviak. At a young age Phil had a fascination with the sea and life under the sea. Desire and destiny collided and he became one of the few selected individuals to man the Cold War's newly developed, devastating, impossibly expensive, extraordinarily dangerous and highly complex nuclear ballistic missile submarines.

Polmar lives in the Washington, DC, area. I just received my copy of the long-awaited book "Cold War Submarines: US & Soviet Design & Construction" by Norman Polmar and Kenneth Moore

Polmar lives in the Washington, DC, area. I just received my copy of the long-awaited book "Cold War Submarines: US & Soviet Design & Construction" by Norman Polmar and Kenneth Moore. I found I could not put it down, and it was well worth the wait. The authors spent years interviewing key figures and reading material from both sides of the Cold War. It starts just after the Second World War, and looks at each side's diesel and exotic propulsion plants and designs.

Life Aboard the Crazy Polack: Memoirs of Family Tragedy, Heroism and Cold War Submarine Adventure by Phil Jaskoviak (Feb 16, 2011). Polack: Webster's Timeline History, 1584 - 2007 by Icon Group International (Aug 17, 2010). Circus Coloring and Cutout Book by Anon (1940). 23rd Annual Flint Shrine Circus Souvenir Program and Magazine 1966 by Polack Brothers Circus (1966).

Life Aboard the Crazy Polack. Memoirs of Family Tragedy, Heroism and Cold War Submarine Adventure Phil Jaskoviak. In this book Phil Jaskoviak tells of his adventures of serving in the . Naval service on submarines. Included in the book is one chapter titled "The Wee One" that tells the story of his mother, her birth and the history of her life in Castle Gate, Carbon, Utah. This index is a list of the names that appear in that one chapter. If you are interested in purchasing this book please contact Phil Jaskoviak.

The tragic consequences of war echo through the generations in this stunning tale, inspired by true events, about how family secrets can haunt us; and how love . Beyond the Kindertransport: A Memoir of Music, Love, and Survival.

The tragic consequences of war echo through the generations in this stunning tale, inspired by true events, about how family secrets can haunt us; and how love can guide us through the darkest times.

Everyday Heroes: The True Story of a Lighthouse Family. A wonderful article on life and living aboard. Dr. Shaelyn Pham author of the Joy of Me. Author. Check this out! wfae. s Corridors Of Power, A Channel Of Laid-Back Houseboat Life. a stone's throw from the White House, the . The Essentials of Living Aboard a Boat Book by Mark Nicholas. 28 July at 06:56 ·. I'm telling you, without a doubt I could live in Auckland. Auckland's high rents and traffic: Kiwis opt to live aboard their boats.

CNN) Sailing on a .

By Jim Sciutto, Chief National Security Correspondent. Updated 0841 GMT (1641 HKT) October 26, 2017. CNN) Sailing on a . nuclear attack submarine is a trip into a cramped, timeless, windowless undersea world. My team and I got an exclusive trip on the USS Missouri during exercises in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Florida. Sometimes you go find a quiet corner and read a book," or watch a movie with your buddies on the projector in the crew's mess or the cafeteria aboard the sub. While politics is a seldom discussed topic, the sailors said the "politics" of sports, and how one's team stacks up against another, is always fair game.

At a young age Phil had a fascination with the sea and life under the sea. Desire and destiny collided and he became one of the few selected individuals to man the Cold War's newly developed, devastating, impossibly expensive, extraordinarily dangerous and highly complex nuclear ballistic missile submarines. How Phil ended up living on the front lines of the Cold War along with the amazing history of his parents are contained in the captivating story; "Life Aboard the Crazy Polack." Author Phil Jaskoviak was born in 1949 in a small Chicago suburb to a father of Polish immigrants and a man that had recently witnessed unbelievable atrocities of war. Phil's mother was a Scottish immigrant, coal miners' daughter who, at a very young age, faced combined and unimaginable tragedies but despite the extreme adversity ended up as a model for survival.
Comments: (7)
Fecage
Life Aboard the Crazy Polack? If you're looking for a book about submarine life, very little is written here. Much written of family history and 1960's social changes.

Apparently self-published, it is significantly better written than "Tales From Da Bronx Submariner," but editing was little more than spellcheck. There are numerous technical inaccuracies that I attribute to the time lapse of the author's memory. A review by another submariner may have revealed that there was only one LiBr, that Pulaski was depth restricted during the time frame of this work (not made Sub-Safe until subsequent overhaul thus never reached the depths written), and clear up confusion between Norwich & Norwalk as well as the geography of Charleston Harbor. There are many many more, but you get the idea.

Nit picking? Yeah, but I paralleled the writer's experience on sister ship Von Steuben (SSBN 632) during this time, leaving Rota & the shipyard overhaul in Groton a few months ahead. I subsequently served on Pulaski in the 1980s.
Mopimicr
I too was stationed on the Casimir Pulaski though not at the same time as the author. I found Mr. Jaskoviak to be very knowledgeable about life aboard the Pulaski and really enjoyed the book. More than that, the book is an important read for all Americans because the sailors that manned those boats really helped to end the Cold War in our favor and helped to avert a nuclear armageddon. The contribution to our freedom and safety that those sailors made must never be forgotten and this book will help future generations to never forget them.
Llbery
Life Aboard the Crazy Polack offers a little bit of everything - and I mean that in the most positive way. It is the story of Polish immigrants and their desire to succeed in America. This book packs a lot of history - both good and bad. It's also part McHale's Navy - with real life characters and amusing antics. Parts of it are just flat out funny. The technical talk is plentiful. The reader will finish this book and get a flavor for what it was like to travel on a nuclear submarine during the Cold War.

The heart of this story is the author himself - and his desire to find purpose in his life. Phil Jaskoviak finds that purpose while serving as a mechanic on the Crazy Polack in the U.S. Navy. It is a story that offers hope to anybody that is trying to find meaning in their life.

I wholeheartedly recommend Life Aboard the Crazy Polack.
Maridor
As a fan of contemporary and military history, I am always looking for something new and different to read. This book is both. It's a first-person narrative that combines history and personal recollections to tell a very unique story. The author takes us through a tale of family highs and lows, youth, and military service during the Cold War. What makes this book particularly interesting is the author's participation in the often overlooked and underappreciated U.S. Navy's "Silent Service."
jorik
Attended a Pulaski reunion recently, touching base with several shipmates, so this book has been extra enjoyable for me. I made eight patrols on the 633 boat during the 70's, four on the Gold crew, and four on the Blue. Was a Senior Chief of the Weapons Division, and stood Diving Officer Watches at sea. This book is well written, and a good trip for me.
Gri
Sorry, Phil, but I wouldn't sign off your card! (And I signed a few on SSBN-630 and 635!)

Too many inaccuracies, and not enough submarine stuff, particularly that's correct!

In a world becoming filled with more and more "mis-spoken" stuff, this belongs in the TDU.

(TDU = Trash Disposal Unit, for those who haven't served on submarines.)

Lil'Joe in Conroe
Ironfire
There are very few books written about life aboard a ballistic missile submarine, and rightfully so, as life aboard them is so boring, unless it is fiction. But, of the thousands of ex-SSBN sailors who read this book, many will still find it interesting. I served on the first SSBN, the George Washington SSBN 598 four years before Phil enlisted, but from his accounts not much changed in those interim years. His book brought back many, many memories, which is one reason I read it.

Phil does a good job describing life aboard these awesome subs as seen from an very junior enlisted mans perspective, although his memory is a bit fuzzy on geography and some technical stuff.

The author joins the navy with an extremely poor education (132nd in a class of 137 in high school) and no skills, yet somehow he is assigned to one of the most critical duties in the US Navy, a ballistic missile submarine. I had to wonder what his basic test scores were from boot camp to get this important assignment. His descriptions of boot camp, sub school, life aboard a sub, submarine qualifications and all the duty stations is close to what I remember. But, I was taken aback by his disclosure of certain sensitive information. Did the FBI come knocking on his door after he published this book?

It was very apparent that the author self-published this book and that he took very much information from other sources, sometimes word-for-word. In his defense, he did mention some of those other sources in the bibliography.

There is also a very big difference in the writing style of his own memories and the writing style for technical data and political information. I could easily tell when he shifted from 'what I remember' to 'what I read about and copied.'

The author also repeated information too many times and the flow was back and forth, past to future to past. And, as mentioned in an earlier review, he mixed up Norwalk, CT for Norwich, CT, Polaris for Poseideon and the location of Fort Sumter which on the south side of Charleston Harbor. There were quite a few more errors that careful editing would have caught.

This is not a bad book to read but some ex-submariners would certainly pick it apart.