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eBook First Across the Rhine: The 291st Engineer Combat Battalion in France, Belgium, and Germany download

by David E. Pergrin

eBook First Across the Rhine: The 291st Engineer Combat Battalion in France, Belgium, and Germany download ISBN: 0689120338
Author: David E. Pergrin
Publisher: Pacifica Pr; First Edition edition (June 1, 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 337
ePub: 1400 kb
Fb2: 1421 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: rtf doc doc docx
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

First Across the Rhine book.

First Across the Rhine book. Pergrin follows the battalion from its formation and training through the campaigns in France, Belgium, and Germany, making us witness the genuine heroics, skill, and spirit that lifted the 291st to the realm of legend.

From Library Journal. Why did the 291st Engineer Combat Battalion stand its ground during the Battle of the Bulge when many combat and support outfits broke and fled? According to Pergrin, former commanding officer, pride, morale, training, and leadership caused the 291st to be named the premier engineer battalion in Europe in World War II. The battalion built the first bridge over the Rhine in the face of murderous enemy fire. Their stubborn stand during the Bulge enabled the . First Army to reform and decisively counterattack.

Pergrin's sterling battalion endured its baptism of fire in the Normandy breakout in the summer of 1944, played . From Library Journal. Why did the 291st Engineer Combat Battalion stand its ground during the Battle of the Bulge when many combat and support outfits broke and fled?

Pergrin's sterling battalion endured its baptism of fire in the Normandy breakout in the summer of 1944, played an important role in the Battle of the Bulge and in March 1945 opened the way for the climactic drive into Germany by building the first Allied bridge across the Rhine.

Colonel David E. Pergrin (26 July 1917 – 7 April 2012) was commanding officer of the 291st Engineer Combat Battalion of the United States Army during World War II. Before the war he earned an engineering degree at Pennsylvania State University, graduating in 1940. While at Penn State he participated in the ROTC program. In addition, Pergrin played on the university's football team, was elected to the Tau Beta Pi and Chi Epsilon engineering honor societies, and was senior class president.

First Across the Rhine : The 291st Engineer Combat Battalion in France, Belgium, and Germany. By (author) David Pergrin, By (author) Eric M. Hammel. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). In what quickly came to be called the Battle of the Bulge, the 291st Engineer Combat Battalion found itself directly in the path of the German spearhead.

Author: Colonel David E. Pergrin with Eric Hammel. Publisher: Zenith Press. Constructing a 330-metre pontoon bridge in 32 hours would by unthinkable in peacetime. That it was achieved under heavy fire across the fast flowing Rhine was close to miraculous. War brings out the worst in men but it can also bring out their best. Some of the exploits of Colonel Pergrin’s battalion were very much of the latter kind. This excellent book well describes the important achievements of this unit which so often and so imaginatively used boats, pontoons and barges to complete its construction projects. Pergrin was commanding officer of the 291st Engineer . First Across the Rhine: The 291st Engineer Combat Battalion in France, Belgium and Germany. Pergrin was commanding officer of the 291st Engineer Combat Battalion during World War II. He also took up woodcarving as a hobby and published several books intended as guides for carving animals. St. Paul, MN. ISBN 0-7603-2408-5.

Pergrin's engineers arrived in France only days after the invasion of Normandy (having previously gathered in southern England as part of the Operation Bolero ruse that . Pub Date: June 1st, 1989.

Pergrin's engineers arrived in France only days after the invasion of Normandy (having previously gathered in southern England as part of the Operation Bolero ruse that tried to throw Hitler off the mark of the Operation Overlord plans in northern France), and soon earned a reputation as the Army's finest.

David E. Pergrin, Eric Hammel -- As commander of the 291st Engineer Combat Battalion, Mr. Pergrin reveals how important this group was to the Battle of the Bulge and the invasion of Germany. Tell Us What You Think About This Product.

From Normandy to the heart of Germany itself, the 291st Engineer Combat Battalion literally paved the way for the Allies' final march to victory in Europe. Pacifica Military History, Pacifica Press (CA).

Recounts the adventures of the U.S. soldiers who led the way to the Battle of the Bulge
Comments: (7)
Scream_I LOVE YOU
This is one of the few books I've found covering the vital role of Combat Engineers; it was written by the Commanding Officer of the war's most decorated CE battalion, which served mostly in the 1st Army area. This unit laid and cleared minefields, built bridges, maintained roads - often while under enemy fire - and their efforts were crucially important to 82nd Airborne, 30th Infantry, 99th Infantry, and other fighting units. The narrative on the 291st's actions in the Battle of the Bulge are particularly exciting to read as is the author's description of their building the first Allied bridge across the Rhine river. It is evident that the Infantry could not have succeeded without the support of the courageous and hardworking Combat Engineers.
Knights from Bernin
This was excellent but far too detailed. A better editing job would have helped a lot to hone the chapters down. Overall a fine account of what combat engineers did to win the war for America. They are rarely thought of, and I don't think honored too often.
A great WW II memoir by someone who was at the front and saw the war on a personal level.
Vudojar
This is a good description of the various tasks than an engineering battalion was called upon to perform during the European theater in WWII - an area that typically doesn't get much mention during accounts of the war, but so vital to continuing the offensive. It may be hard for some readers not familiar with military bridges of the era (Bailey & pontoon) to grasp just how difficult some of these tasks are, but as a former U.S. Army combat engineer who constructed these in peacetime, it's amazing what these guys were able to accomplish. This book is well written and an enjoyable read - recommended!
Nakora
I was fascinated to find the story of my uncles actual involvement in this amazing unit of combat engineers as a dentist and medic. This was my fathers identical twin and the described details of his death 10 days before the war ended were both shocking and fascinating to me and my family.
Porgisk
Though the story itself is fascinating and the Col's memory amazing, it is told from a field grade officers point of view i.e. wider. This provides a unique insight into the decision making process behind the actions of the line soldiers but with little hands on perspective. Battles are fought and wars are won in the trenches and that to me is where the story lies; not in the minutiae of command decisions. That being said, though at times tedious, I found the perspective somewhat interesting.
Snake Rocking
It's interesting, and good really; learning and understanding things I hadn't really ever given any thought to. But I'm afraid I don't enjoy non-fiction much so am struggling through it off and on when I have nothing else to read.
uspeh
Amazing story. The small group of Engineers took out bridges and delayed advance of the German tanks. Had it not been for the actions of these guys, many more Allied soldiers would have died.
The book was a gift. It arrived on time and in good condition.
excellent, good detail, thorough