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eBook Steel My Soldiers' Hearts: The Hopeless to Hardcore Transformation of the U.S. Army, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, Vietnam download

by Eilhys England,David H. Hackworth

eBook Steel My Soldiers' Hearts: The Hopeless to Hardcore Transformation of the U.S. Army, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, Vietnam download ISBN: 1590710029
Author: Eilhys England,David H. Hackworth
Publisher: Rugged Land; 1 edition (May 1, 2002)
Language: English
Pages: 512
ePub: 1671 kb
Fb2: 1833 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit docx txt mbr
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

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FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In January 1969, one of the most promising young lieutenant colonels the US Army had ever seen touched down in Vietnam for his second tour of duty. Steel My Soldier's Hearts" is a manual in the traits of personal leadership for all organizations - how to make them better and allow contributions from all people - of all capabilities and at every level. Hack was an officer who bent people to his will - fierce determination to succeed and to complete the mission - and to take care of his troops.

Steel My Soldiers' Hearts book. Hackworth’s story begins with him taking command over the 4th Battalion 39th Infantry Regiment, which is assessed by its command to be completely ineffective. Hackworth finds the units base set up in a minefield producing new casualties every day. As the former commander apparently did not show much leadership the rest of the book depicts the author’s measures to reinstate discipline, select leaders able to fight and to introduce new tactics to make the unit more effective and reduce casualties.

Смешные испуги людей и животных (Посмейся, только не лопни) - Продолжительность: 8:11 RiBriS Recommended for you.

Hackworth, David H, Colonel. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on March 2, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

With Steel My Soldiers' Hearts, Hackworth places the brotherhood of the 4/39th into the pantheon of our nation's most . Eilhys England produces feature films and writes with her partner and husband, David Hackworth. They live in Connecticut and Australia.

With Steel My Soldiers' Hearts, Hackworth places the brotherhood of the 4/39th into the pantheon of our nation's most heroic warriors. Format Paperback 464 pages.

With Steel My Soldiers' Hearts, Hackworth places the brotherhood of the 4/39th into the pantheon of our . Combine this with We Were Soldiers Once and Young and Heart of a Soldier and you have a set of books that intersect which I was not expecting. I actually brought these three books on a trip not expecting them to have so much in comomon. Hackworth is a great author and this along with About Face is an excellent book.

Drawing on interviews with Vietnam War soldiers from the Hardcore Battalion conducted over the past decade, this national bestseller takes readers along on their sniper missions, ambush actions, helicopter strikes, and inside the quagmire of command politics. 49 people like this topic.

Poorly led (the previous commander had based the battalion in the middle of a mine field), with frightfully high casualties (40 percent during the six months prior to Hackworth's arrival), and fighting in the most dangerous of terrain, the 4/39th was a dispirited and demoralized group when Hackworth assumed command in January, 1969.

In January 1969, one of the most promising young lieutenant colonels the US Army had ever seen touched down in Vietnam for his second tour of duty, which would turn out to be his most daring and legendary.

Hardback David Baldacci Books.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Steel My Soliders' Hearts: The Hopeless to Hardcore Transformation of A . 1). £2. 3 New. -- Used. Hardback David Baldacci Books.

Colonel David H. Hackworth, one of America's most decorated soldiers, lays bare his most daring and legendary tour of duty.1966With a full year of Vietnam combat and five months of in-country intense after-action analysis under his pistol belt, Hackworth pens the classic tactical handbook the Vietnam Primer with military historian Samuel Marshall. In a radical shift from the World War II-era tactics then employed in Vietnam, Hackworth stresses the necessity of using disciplined, small units of well-trained men to best fight the hit-and-run warfare of the elusive Viet Cong. "Out G'ing the G," he called his tactics.1969Hackworth's expertise lands him back in Vietnam. The Army's message is clear-put up, or shut up. Given the "hopeless," morale-drained 4/39th-an infantry battalion of poorly led draftees with one of the Army's worst casualty rates-Hackworth leads from up front and finds the best in every one of his grunts. Together, they take a page from the VC, write their own book, and become the meanest in the Mekong Delta-the Hardcore Recondos.2002With the U.S. again facing elusive insurgent foes-and the hit-and-run tactics of the international terror networks we're presently up against-the 4/39th Hardcore Battalion's successes provide hard-won lessons-learned that are more applicable now than ever.A tour de force of frontline combat action, Steel My Soldiers' Hearts takes readers alongside sniper missions, into grunt ambush actions, above fields of fire with hard-hitting helicopter strikes, and inside the quagmire of command politics. Hackworth graduates the Mekong Delta brotherhood into the pantheon of our nation's most heroic warriors.
Comments: (7)
Beazerdred
I was one of Colonel Hackworth's grunts. I had the high honor of being part of this book. It is written in the words of the young men,mostly draftees, that were engaged in the 3 day battle from March 23rd to the 25th. Hack was an outstanding military combat leader. His motto was lead from the front, which he did. He probably was one of a very few commanders that actually was in the field with his men. Most Colonels stayed at base camps, or flew overhead viewing the battle from their chopper. I went from private E-2 to Sgt E-5 in under 8 months. I was point man, RTO, squad leader, acting platoon sergeant, and acting platoon leader. Some of my words are in the book, and I was very honored to have my photo also in the book. I served with almost all draftees, we lost some very good soldiers, but most of all they were young kids and great Americans. We all did the job we were assigned to do by our Nation. We were not baby killers, murders, rapists, or druggies. The life of a front line grunt can only be explained, and understood by those of us that were there and that survived the war. Most all of us came home with deep emotional wounds, which most of us carry with us to this day. It was an honor to serve with Sgt Gary Stevens, SSG Toby Hagar, Bn. Dr. Byron Holley, Sgt. Thomas Aiken, Sgt. Terry Calandra, all were draftees except Calandra. Hack was thrown under the truck when he said that the war in Vietnam couldn't be won militarily. The Army he loved turned his back on him and treated him like cancer. The only problem with their thinking was that he was "RIGHT". His passing was a very sad day for me. He is a hero to all of us that had the honor to fight under him as our commander. On May 17th 1969 I was seriously wounded, when our company was ambushed, and in two weeks was medically evacuated back to the World, as us grunts called it.

Sgt. Jim Silva
4th Bn. 39th Inf, Co. D, 9th Infantry Divison
Vietnam: Sept 68-May 17, 1969
Gholbirdred
This book was introduced to me through the Jocko podcast. It was a real eye opener on what happened in Vietnam and how Hackworth turned around a group of poorly lead soldiers to a highly proficient killing machine in matter of months. Very inspiring to see hardcore discipline and experience in action. Never being in the military this book enlightened what the front line soldiers go through. Respect to all our front line soldiers.
lolike
[I'll preface this review by admitting I had Hack autograph my Amazon purchased copy in 2002-something I've rarely done. Hack died recently - the world will miss his bravery, honor and grit.]

The conflicts most important to the US Army are fought in Washington, DC. The results from these battles - between State and Defense - inter-service - or between military contractors -filter down to the troops - tragically sometimes in combat.

None can deny that the Officer Corps of the United States Army has become (virtually) a political rat hole. Careerism - in my day - started at Colonel - now some Captains and Majors refuse to be risk takers for fear of career ending errors. Additionally, when how war is conducted becomes the focus of Presidential politics - it is only the troops who suffer.

When viewed by civilians - the United States Army is a terrible place to have a career. Low pay, slow promotion, terrible benefits, bad food and housing - and oh ya' - dangerous. So why do we continue to find such strong, smart and larger than life individuals who thrive and succeed in this environment? Young men, such as David Hackworth, volunteer, find themselves and then inspire others to reach their ultimate capabilites and beyond!

The Army of today is all volunteer. Most who enlist do so for personal reasons - this thing about defending our country. During the Vietnam War, Col David Hackworth did not have the luxury of commanding a volunteer force. Like him, I commanded a majority of troops who did NOT want to wear the uniform (in my case a platoon) - and worse - found themselves in a combat zone against their will - impressed into an uncaring system that cheapened their contributions, sacrifices - and even their lives. Unlike me - Hack never had the joys and rewards of command in the all volunteer force.

"Steel My Soldier's Hearts" is a manual in the traits of personal leadership for all organizations - how to make them better and allow contributions from all people - of all capabilities and at every level. Hack was an officer who bent people to his will - fierce determination to succeed and to complete the mission - and to take care of his troops. He let nothing stand in his way to achieve his goals.

Hackworth succeeded where others failed - by inspiring, leading by example, showing results by and for his troops. First, he taught them how to survive - then defeat the enemy by outthinking them at EVERY turn. Hackworth was a military artist - not a military scientist, his lessons learned were personal. Some techniques are transferrable to others - the will and determination - probably not. This is the David Hackworth I admire.

Such personalities collect enemies along the way. Thanks either to fear, intimidation or bad aim - Hack was spared 'fragging' and succeeded building a magnificent fighting force. Criticism of Hack as a self promoting grandstander can probably be justified. He earned the right to do so! He had no tolerance for those he viewed as obstacles. He purged officers - bad and good - deserving and undeserving - happens all the time. Anybody who served on a staff of 'Stormin Norman' Schwartzkopf would make Hack out to be an angel of mercy!

Hack tries to show people the truth of war and military service. Anyone who contemplates wearing the uniform should read all of Hackworth's writings. Those who wear the uniform - or have worn the uniform will be comforted by Hack's confirmation of vanity, glory, selfish enrichment and stupidity by those who led us - and of the government we served.

[Hack - RIP, Mike Horn, LTC, MI, USA, 1970-1996, ret]
Agrainel
This book was recommended to me by my brother who was a ranger and served with the LRRP’s in 1968-1969 in the Mekong Delta. It is an excellent book and answered a lot of questions I had after seeing the Vietnam War documentary by Ken Burns. (I am a 69 yr old female)
Zacki
A great read for all. Learn about leadership, and learn about history. This book will tech you how a little discipline can change anyone.