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eBook Lost in Tibet: The Untold Story Of Five American Airmen, A Doomed Plane, And The Will To Survive download

by Richard Starks

eBook Lost in Tibet: The Untold Story Of Five American Airmen, A Doomed Plane, And The Will To Survive download ISBN: 0762781343
Author: Richard Starks
Publisher: Lyons Press; Second edition (September 4, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1526 kb
Fb2: 1771 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf azw mobi doc
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

Did I mention that I traveled Tibet in 1987. What makes "Lost in Tibet" an absolutely outstanding book is that more than the other two it explains the political backdrop.

Visit them at ww. tarksmurcutt. Did I mention that I traveled Tibet in 1987. On the surface, the events look like nothing unusual. An American plane gets carried from its path by a violent storm, the five man crew bails out, the plane crashes. The five airmen find themselves in Tibet.

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Now back in print, Lost in Tibet is an extraordinary story of high adventure that sheds light on the remarkable .

Now back in print, Lost in Tibet is an extraordinary story of high adventure that sheds light on the remarkable Tibetan people, just at the moment when they were coming to terms with a hostile outside world. Authors Starks and Murcutt absorbingly recount the political conquest of Tibet through the story of these five young men’s unwitting embroilment in an international incident and their extraordinary journey home. Publishers Weekly online. This is a fine story of courage and diplomacy that presents invaluable information on a little-known theater of WWII and insight into the Tibet-China political situation.

Untold story of WWII U S airmen. com User, September 28, 2004. In 1943 during WWII, five . airmen flying the "Hump" between Burma and the . ally Nationalist China were blown off course into Tibet in a storm and bailed out of their plane before it crashed

Untold story of WWII U S airmen. ally Nationalist China were blown off course into Tibet in a storm and bailed out of their plane before it crashed.

This books tells the story of 5 Airmen who wrecked their plane in Tibet flying over the "hump" from China back to.This book tells about an incident that has been hidden for too many years.

This books tells the story of 5 Airmen who wrecked their plane in Tibet flying over the "hump" from China back to India during WWII. It also goes into detail about the political ramifications their. It’s a fascinating adventure that stands out from all the other wartime experiences I have heard about. Charles Martin, former Hump pilot. A well-rendered story of WWII action and adventure, one with plenty of twists and operational pointers for future warriors. It also goes into detail about the political ramifications their appearance caused in China and Tibet and the diplomatic reactions of the US and Britain

This books tells the story of 5 Airmen who wrecked their plane in Tibet flying over the "hump" from China back to India during WWII. It also goes into detail about the political ramifications their appearance caused in China and Tibet and the diplomatic reactions of the US and Britain. Chris El, March 19, 2015.

The Americans Lowell Thomas Jr. and Sr. visited Tibet in 1949, and were issued Tibetan passports at Dromo. Lost in Tibet: The Untold Story of Give American Airmen, a Doomed Plane and the Will to Survive. The L:yons Press, Connecticut, 2004. When the Dalai Lama’s passport was spread out before us, I could not help thinking that many Western explorers who had failed to reach Lhasa would have highly prized a document like this. Since 1912 passports were also issued to Tibetans leavi.

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BestsellersView More. 41% Voice and the ActorBy: Cicely BerryRs. 573 9% Heart Songs and Other StoriesBy: Annie ProulxRs. 25% Lost in Tibet: The Untold Story of Five American Airmen, a Doomed Plane, and the Will to SurviveBy: Richard StarksRs.

Lost in Tibet: The Untold Story of Five American Airmen, a Downed Plane, and the Will to Survive by StarksRichard, MurcuttMiriam.

Caught in a violent storm and blown far off their intended course, five American airmen--flying the dangerous Himalayan supply route known as "The Hump"--were forced to bail out just seconds before their plane ran out of fuel. To their astonishment, they found they had landed in the heart of Tibet. There they had to confront what, to them, seemed a bizarre--even alien--people. At the same time, they had to extricate themselves from the political turmoil that even then was raging around Tibet's right to be independent from China.Now back in print, Lost in Tibet is an extraordinary story of high adventure that sheds light on the remarkable Tibetan people, just at the moment when they were coming to terms with a hostile outside world.
Comments: (7)
Grinin
Already having read Harrer's "Seven Years in Tibet" a few times, and more recently "The Radio Operator: Robert Ford’s Last Stand in the Fight to Save Tibet " it seems I have now gone full circle by also reading "Lost in Tibet: The Untold Story of Five American Airmen, a Doomed Plane, and the Will to Survive."

These three books tell what kind of country Tibet used to be "before the Chinese took over." Did I mention that I traveled Tibet in 1987.

What makes "Lost in Tibet" an absolutely outstanding book is that more than the other two it explains the political backdrop. On the surface, the events look like nothing unusual. An American plane gets carried from its path by a violent storm, the five man crew bails out, the plane crashes. The five airmen find themselves in Tibet.

Forget that they know nothing about Tibet, that some of them are a bit injured, that they have no idea how they can get back to civilization, their presence creates a series of unforeseen "disturbances." From Tibetans who are offended with their presence because they insulted the Dalai Lama by flying "in between him and the heavens," to Chinese diplomats who want to solidify their presence in Tibet and are worried that the plane crash is an Americans cover-up, to British and American diplomats who, theoretically, stand with Tibet as an independent country, but in light of World Wars II going on, have to keep their own interests in mind.

In the midst of these power struggles are the five airmen, who want to get back to their airbase but realize that in a country that has only one big stream, no paved roads, no electricity, only three cars without fuel, and happens to be on a high plateau half the size of Europe, elevation 12,000 to 16,000 feet, things are not that easy.

Having been in Tibet, I was most fascinated by authors' description how many factors had contributed to the Tibet becoming an autonomous province of China. The corrupt regent system, the Tibetans habit to postpone important decisions and following old rituals. and not taking the Chinese efforts as serious as they should have.

This must have something to do the Tibetan atmosphere. I traveled to Tibet in January 1987. Even though I flew from Chengdu to Lhasa, it was a very complicated trip. In January 1987, less than 50 foreigners were in town.

Visiting there and seeing Tibet, I thought, Tibet is eternal (just like the Tibetans described in this book) ... not much would and could change.
Just like the Tibetans did not see the danger, that China would take over, I was completely wrong with my guess.

In 2006, the Qinghai- Tibet Railway was be opened. Over 80% of the 709 miles long section between Golmud and Lhasa are at an elevation of over 13,000 feet.
In this book, authors Murcutt and Starks write, "...No land route across Tibet was ever built..." Because I knew that I did not think that the Chinese could build one railroad "up there", indeed, they are building a second line as I write this.

"Lost in Tibet: The Untold Story of Five American Airmen, a Doomed Plane, and the Will to Survive" is a fascinating book that also tells the story of how the Chinese take-over began.
The best book I read this year. This one I will reread.
5 stars,
Gisela Hausmann, author & blogger
Corgustari
The story of five WWII American airmen, their plane crashed into a Tibetan mountainside, has appeal for those interested in the War, in Tibet, and in good adventure/survival stories. Since these are three of my favorite genres it was hard to miss. The five were tough young American guys, and I wonder if their caliber exists today. When one of them comes to after his parachute drop, finds his leg badly cut, he takes out his survival sewing kit and stitches it together. Another fashions a sling for his broken shoulder and manfully faces his survival weeks. The 1940's Lhasa is different today, the Potala still reigns over the city of course, the monks wear their purple robes with Teva sandals, and they rankle at the Chinese, now a majority. They diplomatically tell you that parts of the Potala were destroyed by fire, neglecting to say the fires were started by the Chinese. There's a Lexus dealership, a modern airport, but they still serve yak butter tea.
Brakora
A skillful telling of an amazing story! The authors do a superb job of intertwining the political backdrop to the story of what was going on in Tibet during WW2, in a way that the famous Seven Years in Tibet never did. In addition, the suspenseful story of how the plane was blown off course is clear and thrilling, as is the narrative of the 5 men's hellish walk back out of Tibet. The picture of Tibet that emerges seems very realistic--neither glossing over the sometimes barbarous conditions that prevailed in traditional Tibet, the poverty, the filth, the distance between the aristocratic class and most other Tibetans, not neglecting the richness and depth of Tibetan culture. My only disappointment with the book was the rather abrupt ending. The story is told in day by day detail until the men cross back into India, and then the afterstory is told in simple bullet points. The greatest strength of the book is that the authors retraced much of the journey through Tibet and so can describe the landscape and terrain in vivid detail. They also use their sources to create a precise history of exactly what happened, and why. If you enjoy adventure stories, you will find much to like here.
Tar
This story is both history and thriller, and tells the little-known story of five American airman who were forced to bail out of their plane, in to a land that could not have been more foreign to these young men. Once I picked it up, I found myself going back every available minute. The adventurous westerners they met there, the politician intrigue and the naive, gracious Tibetans painted a picture that would be incredible if it were not exactly true.

I especially appreciated the explanations of the political implications, because we see the results of those tensions today. All in all, this is one of those rare books I am sure I will read again.

Thank you to the authors for such painstaking details that had such a major impact.
FreandlyMan
This amazing story is about five airmen who were flying from China to India as part of the air bridge established to keep China fighting the Japanese. There were never "routine" flights over the notorious spur of the Himalayas which earned the route the nickname "the Hump," but this run became an adventure when a storm knocked their C-87 Liberator Express so far off course that they wound up over Tibet. Full exhausted, the crew ditched at night with only a few thousand feet to spare (thanks to the height of the mountains) into some of the most inhospitable terrain on Earth. They found themselves in the middle of a closed society and embroiled in political machinations which would put their very lives at risk.

This book was very well-written and really draws the reader into the story. The authors explain the background but manage to keep it interesting. The strongest point is the character sketches which make the people real.