carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » From Slavery to Freetown: Black Loyalists After the American Revolution

eBook From Slavery to Freetown: Black Loyalists After the American Revolution download

by Mary Louise Clifford

eBook From Slavery to Freetown: Black Loyalists After the American Revolution download ISBN: 0786406151
Author: Mary Louise Clifford
Publisher: McFarland Publishing (May 1, 1999)
Language: English
Pages: 264
ePub: 1554 kb
Fb2: 1364 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: mbr doc lit rtf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

From Slavery to Freetown book. An American history book which concentrates on the lives of black loyalists during and after the American Revolution

From Slavery to Freetown book. An American history book which concentrates on the lives of black loyalists during and after the American Revolution.

During the American Revolution over 3,000 persons of African descent were promised freedom by the British if they would desert their American rebel masters and serve the loyalist cause. Those who responded to this promise found refuge in New York. In 1783, after Britain lost the war, they were evacuated to Nova Scotia, where for a decade they were treated as cheap labor by the white loyalists. Those who responded to this promise found refuge in New York

During the American Revolution over 3,000 persons of African descent were promised freedom by the British if they would desert their American rebel masters and serve the loyalist cause. In 1792 they were finally offered a new home in West Africa; over 1,200 responded and became the founders of Freetown in Sierra Leone.

From Slavery to Freetown. Black Loyalists After the American Revolution. by Mary Louise Clifford. Published January 10, 2006 by McFarland & Company, In. Publishers.

6650 Clifford, Mary Louis. From slavery to Freetown: Black Loyalists after the American Revolution (Jefferson, NC, 1999). Blacks in the American Revolution (Westport, CT, 1976). Water from the rock: Black resistance in a revolutionary age (Princeton, NJ, 1991). 6024 Corbett, Theodore G. A clash of cultures on the warpath of nations : the colonial wars in the Hudson-Champlain valley (Fleischmanns, NY,2002). 477p Greene, Robert Ewell. Black courage, 1775-1783: documentation of Black participation in the American Revolution (Washington . 5665 Gutman, Herbert George.

After the war Peters and other former African-American slaves were taken by the British to Nova Scotia with Loyalists . Mary Louise Clifford (2006). From Slavery to Freetown: Black Loyalists After the American Revolution. ISBN 978-0-7864-2557-0.

After the war Peters and other former African-American slaves were taken by the British to Nova Scotia with Loyalists, where they stayed from 1783 to 1791. Initially after being evacuated from New York, Thomas Peters' Loyalist ship had been blown off course and the crew temporarily settled in Bermuda. Eventually Thomas Peters and his family settled in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia. Peters and his fellow Black Pioneer, Murphy Steele petitioned the government for land together. Mary Louise Clifford became interested in the first settlers of Freetown while living in Hill Station while her husband served as UN economic advisor to the prime minister of Sierra Leone. More about Mary Louise Clifford. From Slavery to Freetown.

From Slavery to Freetown: Black Loyalists after the American .

From Slavery to Freetown: Black Loyalists after the American Revolution. Mary Louise Clifford. Clifford, Mary Louise, From Slavery to Freetown: Black Loyalists after the American Revolution ( Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company In. 1999). Experiment in Democracy in an African Nation. This book is about Fourah Bay College (FBC) and its role as an institution of higher learning in both its African and international context. The study traces the College's development through periods of missionary education (1816-1876), colonial education (1876-1938), and development education (1938-2001). New York: Vintage Books. Jefferson: McFarland. Cohen, P. & Augustyn, R. T. (1997). Hodges, G. R. Slavery and freedom in the rural North: African Americans in Monmouth County, New Jersey, 1665–1865. Madison, NJ: Madison House. (1999).

Presents the story of ten freed slaves who deserted their American masters to join the loyalists during the Revolutionary War, and their eventual evacuation to Nova Scotia and then finally to Freetown, Sierra Leone.