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eBook Intelligence Was My Line: Inside Eisenhower's Other Command download

by Donald E. Markle,Ralph W. Hauenstein

eBook Intelligence Was My Line: Inside Eisenhower's Other Command download ISBN: 0781811171
Author: Donald E. Markle,Ralph W. Hauenstein
Publisher: Hippocrene Books; 1St Edition edition (July 30, 2005)
Language: English
Pages: 182
ePub: 1681 kb
Fb2: 1228 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: txt lit docx lrf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

The story of an intelligence officer who first serves in Iceland before the war and the European theater after Pearl Harbor. Hauenstein details the intricacies of the involvement of ETOUSA G-2, the military intelligence wing of the US Army in the European Theater, as well as the pre-war and pre-Normandy role of the US and British occupation of Iceland.

This is the summary of Intelligence Was My Line: Inside Eisenhower's . Command: As Told to Donald Markle by Ralph Hauenstein, Chie by Ralph W. Hauenstein.

This is the summary of Intelligence Was My Line: Inside Eisenhower's Other Command: As Told to Donald Markle by Ralph Hauenstein, Chie by Ralph W. Inside the mind of a master procrastinator Tim Urban - Продолжительность: 14:04 TED Recommended for you. 14:04. How to Start a Speech - Продолжительность: 8:47 Conor Neill Recommended for you.

Intelligence Was My Line book. When Ralph Hauenstein became a reserve officer, he thought. Here, Donald Markle shapes Ralph Hauenstein's remembrances into an informative book that will spark debate among history buffs. Jan 13, 2018 Heather rated it really liked it. Hauenstein was an intelligence officer in World War II. Intelligence Was My Line is his story of that period of time in his life.

by Ralph W. Hauenstein and Donald E. Markle. Intelligence Was My Line. com User, December 4, 2005. This book is a facinating read, providing never seen before insight into US Intelligence prior to and during the European Theater of WWII. I would highly recommend this book to those who are interested in the beginning of the US Intelligence Branch of government and WWII buffs.

Ralph Hauenstein (March 20, 1912 – January 10, 2016) was an American philanthropist, army officer and . Hauenstein, Ralph . and Donald E. Intelligence Was My Line: Inside Eisenhower's Other Command. New York: Hippocrene Books, 2005.

His leadership has produced institutions such as the Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies at Grand Valley State University, the Hauenstein Parkinsons and Neuroscience Centers at Saint Mary's Hospital and the Grace Hauenstein Library at Aquinas College.

Hauenstein, Ralph W. Intelligence Was My Line: Inside Eisenhower’s Other Command.

When Ralph Hauenstein became a reserve officer, he thought the skills he'd gained as newspaperman might be useful. Indeed, he spent World War 2 gathering information from sources as diverse as soldiers who were encouraged to report on one another and code books pulled from downed German planes. Donald Markle shapes Ralph Hauenstein's remembrances into an informative, entertaining book that will spark debate among history buffs. com/dp/B0030MI21Y?tag discounter-20.

Donald Markle shapes Ralph Hauenstein’s remembrances into an informative, entertaining book that will .

Donald Markle shapes Ralph Hauenstein’s remembrances into an informative, entertaining book that will spark debate among history buffs. Excerpt: As the date for the invasion of Europe drew nearer, General Eisenhower and several members of his staff established a temporary headquarters for the Allied command at Portsmouth, on the southern coast of England, because of that location’s proximity to the shores of Normandy. The area was in what we called a virtual state of quarantine preceding the actual invasion.

Ralph Hauenstein, along with Donald Markle, authored a book about his role in the Allied efforts during World War II. "Intelligence Was My Line: Inside Eisenhower's Other Command" was published in 2005 by Hippocrene Books.

Hauenstein, along with Donald Markle, authored a book about his role in the Allied efforts during World War II. Intelligence Was My Line: Inside Eisenhower's Other Command was published in 2005 by Hippocrene Books. "Ford honored with Hauenstein Fellowship award". Grand Valley State University. Retrieved 21 March 2011. Ralph Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies. "Ralph Hauenstein: A Life of Leadership" The Hauenstein Center for Presidential Studies

When Ralph Hauenstein became a reserve officer, he thought the skills he'd gained as newspaperman might be useful. Indeed, he spent World War 2 gathering information from sources as diverse as soldiers who were encouraged to report on one another and code books pulled from downed German planes. The story of Major Hauenstein's war is also the story of the European Theatre of US Operations, the American command of General Dwight D Eisenhower, who spun between ETOUSA and his international position at Allied headquarters, SHAEF, with dizzying speed. SHAEF dominates histories of the time; ETOUSA is comparatively little studied and understood, but as Hauenstein explains, we couldn't have won the war without it. Donald Markle shapes Ralph Hauenstein's remembrances into an informative, entertaining book that will spark debate among history buffs.
Comments: (7)
JOGETIME
This is a tragedy. A true missed opportunity to get some insight from a guy who served in a very interesting and under documented position. It's short, and basically 'things mentioned in an interview.' Without knowing more of the background to this book, it just seems like it was done quickly, with no real research to bring forth areas to dig deeper into, or any return to subjects to pry out more info- which is such a waste. There are so many aspects of the intel war that I would have loved to ask about, but are just not there. Was the subject starting to have memory issues? In one specific area I happen to know a great deal of what is being talked about, and it is curiously not correct. And yet in other aspects things correlate with what I have found in independent research into archival records. Of course, maybe this was all the author could get from the subject, and we should be happy for what little has been preserved. Certainly not worth the current price, and I would only recommend this for someone who HAS to check every possibly reference for wartime intel, like a Phd student, not for the casual or even moderate reader.
Tinavio
This is a top-notch book that shares seminal experiences of an individual, the type of which who rarely make headlines. Histories tell stories of the most well-known or "great" warriors, but many ordinary people undertake extraordinary actions. Ralph Hauenstein's story is inspiring. We learn of his commitment to family; is this a virtue today? We learn of his support and service for African American soldiers during the decades of segregation; how many individuals in higher positions regarded these soldiers as well as he did? We learn of secret pre-WWII assignments to Iceland, when the general public was prohibited from knowing specific details; in an age of Facebook and self-aggrandizement, who reflects the humility and call of duty, shown by Hauenstein? And the work of WWII invasions with Dwight Eisenhower; Hauenstein was at the front lines. He saw the worst that humans in positions of leadership could do, and he commited later in life to directing young leaders to making better choices. Others over self. The greater good. These are not empty sentiments; they are living actions, embodied by a great man. This book may be critical reading today for young students who are interested in the world wars of the twentieth century. There is so much more to this man's story, but this book is a fine telling of history, one that notes the pursuit of others over self, a message we need to hear today.
Eigonn
This is the memoir of a staff officer, a former newspaper editor. It does not have the intimacy in the writing, nor the urgency in the story of combat memoirs as E.B. Sledge's, Ted Fahrenwald's, Alvin Kernan's, or Keith Douglas' books have. Colonel Hauenstein's story though is a vital part of the whole story of World War II and the U.S. Army's part of that story. This is readable and well describes the work of those behind the lines who must exist for the support of the fighting troops. It's not a page turner, but highly recommended.
Gelgen
"Intelligence Was My Line" tells a very different perspective from the typical WWII account. The story of an intelligence officer who first serves in Iceland before the war and the European theater after Pearl Harbor.

Mr. Hauenstein's experiences in the CCC, and the racial integration problems even in places like Michigan were new to me. I had previously heard nothing of the Allied occupation of Iceland, this may be where the book shines the brightest, it keeps good pacing and keeps the anecdotes coming.

The section after the official entry of the united States into WWII, is the worst part. The narrative repeats and gets bogged down, I believe some of it may be the subject matter. The complicated interactions between councils, committees and national commands is poorly explained and I did not take the time to map out what did what and with whom. There are some interesting nuggets of information, especially pertaining to ULTRA and its role in Allied planning.

All told the strong first half, carries the confused and slow second half. I managed to get this for free and for that price it was well worth it, but the current price tag ($14.97) would be too much for me.
unmasked
Anyone deeply vested in learning the proper history behind the events of the European Theater of World War II need look no further than here. Hauenstein details the intricacies of the involvement of ETOUSA G-2, the military intelligence wing of the US Army in the European Theater, as well as the pre-war and pre-Normandy role of the US and British occupation of Iceland. All of these elements are rarely if ever reported in other WWII historical texts, and have never been reported before from the vantage point of someone as highly connected in the intelligence community as Colonel (Ret.) Hauenstein.

Even if you are just a casual reader, the later chapters give some amusing anecdotes about how the US and French militaries acted during and after the liberation of Paris, and the earlier chapters provide some insight into the plight of the soldiers stationed in Iceland, along with some curiosities of the diplomatic negotiations early on in the war.
MilsoN
Very interesting memoir of a key member of the American intelligence community during WWII. Little attention has been given to the role of intelligence in winning the war, and Hauenstein was there and an active participant.

The chapter on the different command structure was rather tedious, and the author tends to get repetitive at times.

Well worth reading.
Ueledavi
This was a very interesting book about the American troops in Iceland before America entered the war (WW2) . This covered a subject I had never heard of. I loved this book. Highly recommended.
Interesting book and perspective. However I was left wanting more details, more information. I love books that give a true look or perspective into a particular area of interest. This that but it is very limited.