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by Shusha Guppy

eBook Blindfold Horse: Memories of a Persian Childhood download ISBN: 0434308501
Author: Shusha Guppy
Publisher: William Heinemann Ltd; First Edition edition (April 11, 1988)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1725 kb
Fb2: 1283 kb
Rating: 4.6
Other formats: azw doc mbr txt
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

Shusha Guppy is also a gifted story-teller.

Shusha Guppy is also a gifted story-teller. Despite this slight sour note, this book reads like the tales of a modern Scheherazade, who regales us with matchmaking bathhouse attendants and philandering mullahs, strict teachers and loving fathers, and of course, the blindfold horse treading round and round in a cloud of yellow turmeric and dreaming of paradise. Paradise is a Persian childhood as remembered by this author.

Guppy's first book, The Blindfold Horse: Memoirs of a Persian Childhood, was published in 1988. The Blindfold Horse: Memories of a Persian Childhood, William Heinemann Ltd, 1988

Guppy's first book, The Blindfold Horse: Memoirs of a Persian Childhood, was published in 1988. It was highly praised, winning the Yorkshire Post Prize from the Royal Society of Literature, the Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize, and the Grand prix des lectrices de Elle. The book describes a Persia before the excesses of Shah Reza Pahlavi led to his overthrow, describing a country with an Islamic way of life without dogmatism or fanaticism. The Blindfold Horse: Memories of a Persian Childhood, William Heinemann Ltd, 1988, ISBN 978-0-434-30850-7; I B Tauris & Co Ltd, 2004, ISBN 978-1-85043-401-6.

Boston : Beacon Press. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Alethea Bowser on February 9, 2012.

Guppy’s memoir of life in Iran before the Ayatollahs is exquisite. Shusha Guppy was born and brought up in Iran. It conveys a sense of the country and its customs, which reveal better than most documents, the nature of the crisis which Iran is still enduring. Stands comparison with Out of Africa. She went to Paris when she was 17 to study at the Sorbonne, and moved to London in the early 1960s.

The Blindfold Horse book. Start by marking The Blindfold Horse: Memories of a Persian Childhood as Want to Read

The Blindfold Horse book. Start by marking The Blindfold Horse: Memories of a Persian Childhood as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

The Blindfold Horse: Memories of a Persian Childhood. In this eloquent memoir, she recreates the lost world of her childhood before the oil boom and the eventual overthrow of the Shah

The Blindfold Horse: Memories of a Persian Childhood. In this eloquent memoir, she recreates the lost world of her childhood before the oil boom and the eventual overthrow of the Shah. Her magical tales about relatives and friends, music and drama, religious holidays and celebrations are interwoven with myth and legend, poetry and anecdote and provide a rare and optimistic portrayal of Iran. This is an enlightening and moving testimony of a vanished world: a story as vibrant as Iran itself. Other Titles of Interest. Girl in Paris: A Persian Encounter with the West.

Book Description Decades before the Iranian revolution of 1979, which placed the country under a repressive religious rule, Shusha Guppy grew up in a Persia delicately balanced between traditional Islamic life and the transforming forces of westernization. In this eloquent memoir, Guppy recreates the lost world of her childhood before the oil boom and the eventual overthrow of the Shah

Decades before the Iranian revolution of 1979, which placed the country under a repressive religious rule, Shusha Guppy grew up in a Persia delicately balanced between traditional Islamic life and the transforming forces of westernization.

Decades before the Iranian revolution of 1979, which placed the country under a repressive religious rule, Shusha Guppy grew up in a Persia delicately balanced between traditional Islamic life and the transforming forces of westernization. In this eloquent memoir, Guppy recreates the lost world of her childhood before the oil boom and the eventual overthrow of the Shah

Books included "The Blindfold Horse: Memories of a Persian childhood" - 'One of the best books of the 20th century. Stands comparison with Out of Africa

Books included "The Blindfold Horse: Memories of a Persian childhood" - 'One of the best books of the 20th century.

An evocation of a Persian childhood.
Comments: (4)
Agalas
The Blindfold Horse by Shusha Guppy is a very special Memoir of a Persian childhood. I've read many other Persian memoirs, but I found this book really captivating, well written , very informative, filled with fascinating characters and lots of interesting new information. I loved hearing about Shuska's family, her grandfather who was a famous mullah , he died in his sleep at 105, her parents, her extended family, her schooling, the family servants, her education, family friends, and her upbringing. My only complaint was that this edition wasn't edited very carefully. 2 chapters were were totally repeated word for word which is absurd, a good editor should have been on the ball and have caught that . The 2 repeated chapters were A Little Night Music and The Princess, but other than this slight glitch I would give this book top marks. I also loved The Secret of Laughter which Shusha Guppy also wrote, which are stories, and they're magical tales from classical Persia. I got The Secret of Laughter from an English bookstore in Istanbul, they insisted I had to buy the book ( although Amazon sells all 3 of Shusha's books), and they were right), and I plan on getting very soon A Girl in Paris ( about Shuska's time in Paris when she was very young, and attending university. I'm just sorry that Shusha only wrote these 3 books, this is really worth reading, it's a very special memoir.
Anaginn
Until I read this book, I virtually knew nothing about what the life is really like in Iran, even though I've read a few books from the country. The author starts with her family's origin, so to speak, by telling stories of her great-great-grand father who became Haji, and goes down the generations to her own time. Through anecdotes and episodes, she tells of bazaar, social life of different social status people, old remedies for certain sicknesses, how they educated their children, how they treat girls differently from boys, what it is like to be a servant, what roles mullahs play in politics and religion, how some tried to westernize the country and how others opposed, what it was like in the first movie theatres, how they tried to cool themselves during the summer heat, etc, etc.
As you read, the life in Iran becomes very vivid and alive in your heart, as if you yourself grew up with the author, and you start understanding the Persian people and the way they are in very positive ways.
She mentions about religions and politics, as her family has always been one of the powerful and well-respected families which played important roles in religions and politics of the country. 1979 revolution was certainly a bitter experience for many Iranian people. She definitely regrets about it also. But she talks about it rather objectively which allows the reader to see the situation with positive attitude.
Some of the anecdotes are hilarious, unimaginable to some of us. You will find out what they use to treat laringitis and bronchitis, their best remedy which outworks any of the western medicine, or who is the best bone fixer when you broke your bone, or what it is like to be married at age 12.
Very very colorful book. You will find a lot of things you have never imagined, and you will gain a lot of knowledge and love for Iranian people. Recommend you 100%!
Gorisar
Shusha's story telling is so sweet and warm.From her name, I thought she is not from Iran,( not a persian name!) but, yes she is Persian, and her voice is beautiful. But why dose she insist to call the country Persia? The first half of the book, is written so openly and modest, then she just takes us to locations, places, and not so significant introduction of friends and neighbors, when she hardly talks about her siblings and parents.It was difficult to finish the book, still waiting for a catch!Her refernce to the 1979 Iranian revolution, makes the reader think: "so there is no Persia any more"??? The country we know stands still, with any name Shusha likes to call it.
Fast Lovebird
I am so glad to see this book back in print. I bought this book for my daughters, my mother and many of my friends, and I had given out my copy to another friend. The author is so honest in telling her story. I have been looking for the sequel to this story and I will appreciate any information on other books this author has.