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eBook Benjamin Franklin: An American Life download

by Boyd Gaines,Walter Isaacson

eBook Benjamin Franklin: An American Life download ISBN: 074353364X
Author: Boyd Gaines,Walter Isaacson
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Abridged edition (July 1, 2003)
Language: English
ePub: 1549 kb
Fb2: 1604 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: mobi txt lrf lit
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Leaders and Notable People

Walter Isaacson (Author), Boyd Gaines (Reader).

Walter Isaacson (Author), Boyd Gaines (Reader). He is the author of Leonardo da Vinci; The Innovators; Steve Jobs; Einstein: His Life and Universe; Benjamin Franklin: An American Life; and Kissinger: A Biography, and the coauthor of The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made.

Benjamin Franklin and the invention of America : an American life, Walter Isaacson. From these attitudes sprang what may be Franklin’s most important vision: an American national identity based on the virtues and values of its middle class. p. cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. Instinctively more comfortable with democracy than were some of his fellow founders, and devoid of the snobbery that later critics would feel toward his own shopkeeping values, he had faith in the wisdom of the common man and felt that a new nation would draw its strength from what he called the middling people.

Benjamin Franklin by Walter Isaacson - In this authoritative and engrossing full-scale . Abridged Audio Download.

Benjamin Franklin by Walter Isaacson - In this authoritative and engrossing full-scale biography, Walter Isaacson, bestselling author of Einstein and Steve Jobs . The book makes clear that for 15 of the last 17 years of Deborah's life, Franklin lived an ocean away, including when she died. Trade Paperback Hardcover eBook Unabridged Audio Download Abridged Compact Disk.

Benjamin Franklin book. In bestselling author Walter Isaacson's vivid and witty full-scale biography, we discover why Franklin seems to turn to us from history's stage with eyes Benjamin Franklin is the Founding Father who winks at us. An ambitious urban entrepreneur who rose up the social ladder, from leather-aproned shopkeeper to dining with kings, he seems made of flesh rather than of marble.

Benjamin Franklin is the founding father who winks at us, the . Three-time Tony winner Gaines has an obvious interest and affinity for the material.

Benjamin Franklin is the founding father who winks at us, the one who seems made of flesh rather than marble. In this authoritative and engrossing full-scale biography, Walter Isaacson shows how the most fascinating of America's founders helped define our national character. Isaacson's (Kissinger) biography does much to remind us of Franklin's amazing depth and breadth. At once a scientist, craftsman, writer, publisher, comic, sage, ladies' man, statesman, diplomat and inventor, Franklin not only wore many hats, but in many cases, did not have an equal.

Selected and annotated by the author of the acclaimed Benjamin Franklin: An American Life, this collection of Franklin’s writings shows. By the time Henry Kissinger was made secretary of state in 1973, he had become, according to the Gallup Poll, the most admired person in America and one of the most unlikely celebrities ever to capture the world's imagination. Yet Kissinger was also revil

In this colorful and intimate narrative, Isaacson provides the full sweep of Franklin’s amazing life, showing how he helped to forge the American national identity and why he has a particular resonance in the twenty-first century.

Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. In this colorful and intimate narrative, Isaacson provides the full sweep of Franklin’s amazing life, showing how he helped to forge the American national identity and why he has a particular resonance in the twenty-first century.

by Walter Isaacson (Author), Boyd Gaines (Narrator). Other people have covered the details of the book well, so I will compare it to other popular biographies about the Founding Fathers written recently to give the reader an idea of what to expect

by Walter Isaacson (Author), Boyd Gaines (Narrator). Other people have covered the details of the book well, so I will compare it to other popular biographies about the Founding Fathers written recently to give the reader an idea of what to expect. The trend in biographies lately seems to be elegant and almost novelistic prose.

Benjamin Franklin: An American Life. In this authoritative and engrossing full-scale biography, Walter Isaacson, bestselling author of Einstein and Steve Jobs, shows how the most fascinating of America's founders helped define our national character. Benjamin Franklin is the founding father who winks at us, the one who seems made of flesh rather than marble.

Chronicles the founding father's life and his multiple careers, while showing how his faith in the wisdom of the common citizen helped to forge an American national identity based on the virtues of its middle class.
Comments: (7)
Tujar
This is the third copy of this book I have purchased, having given away my other two, that how much I love it. Isaacson wrote an excellent biography of Franklin, one that I've reread a few times. I know the expression"like you were there" is overused but this book actually makes you feel you knew the real Franklin. I've been reading a lot about the younger Franklin recently, his time as an apprentice to his brother James, a printer, his self-education, his escape to Philadelphia, but this book presents the complete Franklin in a way thats reachable. Its not complicated reading, its an exciting story that makes you totally familiar with the man, warts and all.
Vozuru
Other people have covered the details of the book well, so I will compare it to other popular biographies about the Founding​ Fathers written recently to give the reader an idea of what to expect. The trend in biographies lately seems to be elegant and almost novelistic prose. This book is written in a very different style: simple but not simplistic, accessible but not unintelligent. An unusual aspect is that rather than let one subject flow into another, the chapters are further separated into subheadings (e.g. "The American Philosophical Society", "Supplying General Braddock").

The author previously wrote a biography of Steve Jobs, and clearly has an interest in business. Much time is spent on Franklin's early years as a businessman, which I did not find as interesting as his politics. Much time is spent on British colonial economic policy, which I did find very interesting and informative. Additionally, it helped explain why the Tea Partiers were so violently opposed to the taxes and duties. The British government had enacted many policies to keep the colonies economically dependent on the mother country, such as outlawing ironworks in the colonies and suppressing manufacturing. I've read quite a few books about the Revolution and this was the most unexpectedly edifying on the motivations of the rebels in that aspect. This book justifies it's price on that subject alone. (Those uncomfortable with economics should know it was explained clearly enough that I could understand it well, despite having never taken an economics course.)

Additionally, Franklin finally gets his due as a world-class scientist in this biography. As a scientist myself, I wish more had gone into the process of his many discoveries, but it seems likely that there just wasn't enough source material to expand.

A note of criticism: in terms of psychological insight, the book leaves you a little bit wanting. His personal relationships with both men and women are notably detached and a little cold, but no real explanation is given for why this should be so for such an extroverted and warm man. The book quotes the opinion of other commentarors, such as conservative columnist David Brooks, quite a few times on the nature of his political beliefs. I would have preferred the authors own interpretations.

The description of Franklin's transition from a peacemaker who finds himself the target of anger from American rebels for being too inclined to seek compromise- to one of the most passionate voices for independence is elegantly done. When I finished the book I felt like I had real understanding of Franklin as a person full of contractions. A man who loathed conflict but supported a revolution, who wrote The Way to Wealth but was an ardent champion of the common man, who was the darling of the French Court but disliked aristocracy... In other words, a real person, not a cardboard cutout.
Nalme
Benjamin Franklin was a complicated personality whose political views changed over time. Franklin used Greek Philosophy as stepping stones from which he derived his first views on politics, virtues, and moral pragmatism but he shaped and modified these views as he aged. It is probably impossible to capture the essence of Benjamin Franklin's nature but this biography does it as well as it can be done. Franklin was invaluable when it came to editing the Declaration of Independence and negotiating the post-war treaties with France and England which established the first 13 colonies as an independent nation. Franklin preached tolerance and patience to the delegates as they argued about the creation of a representative form of government for the colonies. Concise and impartial this biography credits the imaginative Benjamin Franklin with having a significant influence on American culture and politics.
Fomand
I debated about giving this 4 or 5 stars. It is an excellent read but I settled on 4 stars because the book, even though very well written and even though Franklin was probably the most gifted and the most influential of all the Founding Fathers, did not capture my interest as much as the biographies of Adams, Hamilton, Washington, or Madison. I have not been able to ascertain whether it is Mr. Isaacson’s style of writing or whether it is due to the fact that none of the Founding Fathers, at least as presented in the book, was as imperturbable as Franklin. The man that was presented in this book had total confidence in himself and was able to overcome, with almost blasé nonchalance, the many, many obstacles that he encountered. He was almost devoid of the emotional angst that so riveted the other Founding Fathers.

He was born into a laboring class family not a family of privilege as was Jefferson, Madison, and Washington. He did receive a basic education but for the most part he was self-taught. Despite his lack of education, he was able to develop a theory of electricity which allowed him to manufacture lightning rods for buildings. There were other inventions but this was the one that made him the idol of several Western countries, in particular, France.

He believed in self-reliance, yet at the same time he believed that individuals working together were much more effective in achieving objectives than one individual working alone. Hence, he founded numerous societies and organizations, such as the Philadelphia Fire Department, University of Pennsylvania, American Philosophical Society. All of these had as their objective the creation of a more just and merciful society.

He believed in frugality and yet he was quick to donate to charitable and patriotic causes.

He was probably the greatest diplomat that the United States ever produced. It is unlikely that the French would have given the fledgling U.S. as much aid as they did had not the French almost worshipped Franklin.

On the negative side, Franklin was not much of a husband. He left his common-law wife, Deborah, for decades while he lived in Europe and appears to have had numerous affairs in Deborah’s absence. (This trait probably further endeared him to the French.) Some of the blame for this situation can be placed on Deborah, for he pleaded with her to come with him to Europe but she refused to travel.

If he was not much of a husband, he was a much worse excuse of a parent. He disowned his illegitimate son, William (whom he and Deborah raised, mother never known) because William supported the Loyalist cause in the colonies. After the war, William struggled for a reconciliation with Benjamin, but Benjamin, even though he forgave almost everyone else who had Loyalist leanings, would have nothing to do with William except to try to prevent him from having any means of supporting himself and having any contact with William’s illegitimate son, Temple. Benjamin’s daughter, Sally, worshipped Benjamin and struggled to impress him, but he often met her pleadings with criticisms that she needed to do more.

In the book’s conclusion, the author, Isaacson, evaluates history’s view of Franklin. Over the centuries, it has oscillated between admiration bordering on idolization and abject disdain. Why disdain? Because Franklin represents the virtues of the middle class. To many, this is a boring life filled with trifles not a glorious existence of pursuing grand causes. To many his focus upon frugality, shows an emphasis upon the material world not the world of art or spirituality. I can only imagine Franklin’s answer to these criticisms. Life is filled with trivialities that must be performed. No person, no class of people is above performing these boring but essential activities. This is the most glorious cause of all, that we are all wiling to live on an equal plane with all others rather than one class being condemned to life’s repetitious necessities and another class being free of these shackles and being free to continually experience the euphoria of grandiose pursuits.