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eBook Historic Figures of the Arthurian Era: Authenticating the Enemies and Allies of Britain's download

by Frank D. Reno

eBook Historic Figures of the Arthurian Era: Authenticating the Enemies and Allies of Britain's download ISBN: 0786445092
Author: Frank D. Reno
Publisher: McFarland (November 18, 2009)
Language: English
Pages: 358
ePub: 1196 kb
Fb2: 1499 kb
Rating: 4.7
Other formats: doc lit azw lrf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Historical

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The author has determined in an earlier McFarland book (The Historic King Arthur, 1996, paperback 2007) that there was not a historic King Arthur during the sixth century. However, as listed in The Historia Brittonum, there was a "great king of all the kings of Britain" named Ambrosius Aurelianus who was conflated with a heroic Arthur of the second century, and hence with the legendary King Arthur. To further authenticate the Celtic/Romano "King Arthur,"-that is, Ambrosius-the author here examines seven major historical figures of the period . 383-500 based upon the Genealogical Preface of The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle and the emendation of dates in that chronicle.

Frank D. Reno lectures nationally and in 2002 was invited to Britain to contribute information to the BBC documentary Arthur . Also the author of Historic Figures of the Arthurian Era (2002), he lives in Lafayette, Colorado. Reno lectures nationally and in 2002 was invited to Britain to contribute information to the BBC documentary Arthur: King of the Britons. Paperback: 458 pages. Publisher: McFarland & Company (March 6, 2007).

of the Arthurian Era : Authenticating the Enemies and Allies of Britain's Post-Roman King .

Historic Figures of the Arthurian Era : Authenticating the Enemies and Allies of Britain's Post-Roman King. The author has determined in an earlier McFarland book ( The Historic King Arthur, 1996, paperback 2007) that there was not a historic King Arthur during the sixth century.

Frank D. Reno (2000). Historic Figures of the Arthurian Era: Authenticating the Enemies and Allies of Britain's Post-Roman King. p. 327. ISBN 978-0-7864-0648-7. Cox, Michael, ed. (2004). The Concise Oxford Chronology of English Literature. Oxford University Press.

In an effort to further authenticate the Celtic Arthur as the legendary king, the author examines here the roles of six major .

In an effort to further authenticate the Celtic Arthur as the legendary king, the author examines here the roles of six major figures of the period from . 383 to 518-Vortimer, Vitalinus, Cunedda, Cerdic, Octha, and Mordred. Through an extensive analysis of Arthur's 12 battles listed in the Historia Brittonum, this work explores not only the influences of the High King's allies, but also examines the switch of allegiance by some Britons who joined forces with Arthur's enemies.

Historic Figures of the Arthurian Era : Authenticating the Enemies and Allies of Britian's Post-Roman King by Frank D. Reno. However, what is missing from the histories is detailed in Monmouth's narrative. As a lead-in to the role of Vortimer, Monmouth borrowed the introductory material from Chapter 36 of the HB.

Historic Figures of the Arthurian. Era: Authenticating the Enemies and. Allies of Britain’s Post-Roman King. Authenticating the Celtic Hero. of Post-Roman Britain. Well worth your while.

Arthur of the Britons is a British television show about the historical King Arthur. Produced by the HTV regional franchise, it consisted of two series, released between 1972 and 1973. ITV had already a reputation for entertaining historical TV shows that would display adventure and swordplay, such as The Adventures of the Scarlet Pimpernel (1956), The Adventures of Robin Hood (1955), The Adventures of Sir Lancelot (1956), Ivanhoe (1958) and Sir Francis Drake (1961)

The inhabitants of Britain fought fiercely against the invaders through several centuries of turmoil. One of the poems, The Gododdin, contains the very first reference to Arthur, though Arthur himself doesn’t actually appear in it.

The inhabitants of Britain fought fiercely against the invaders through several centuries of turmoil. There are hardly any written records from this time, so it’s difficult to reconstruct an accurate history. However, surviving poetry from the era gives us some clues. It says a different warrior, named Gwawrddur, was skilled at slaying his enemies, but was no Arthur.

Separating fiction from history in a matter that has long vexed historians, the author demonstrates in an earlier McFarland book that the true King Arthur was a Celtic king of post-Roman Britain who lived in the late fifth and early sixth centuries. In an effort to further authenticate the Celtic Arthur as the legendary king, the author examines here the roles of six major figures of the period A.D. 383-518: Vortimer, Vitalinus, Cunedda, Cerdic, Octha, and Mordred. Through an extensive analysis of Arthur's 12 battles listed in the Historia Brittonum, this work explores both the influences of the High King's allies, and the shifting allegiance of those Britons who joined with Arthur's enemies. A battle list provides possible geographic locations for each of the battles, including a new site for Arthur's fateful battle at Camlann.