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eBook Virgil Earp: Western Peace Officer download

by Donald Chaput

eBook Virgil Earp: Western Peace Officer download ISBN: 080612881X
Author: Donald Chaput
Publisher: Univ of Oklahoma Pr (September 1, 1996)
Language: English
Pages: 255
ePub: 1774 kb
Fb2: 1501 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: azw lit lrf docx
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Historical

While the book was published in 1994, there are still new un-read hard-bounds in the market.

While the book was published in 1994, there are still new un-read hard-bounds in the market. My knowledge of the Earp brothers was primarily obtained through movies and television.

Now, for the first time, Donald Chaput removes the eldest brother, Virgil Earp, from that shadow and tells in detail the story of the real leader of the Earp clan

The exploits of Wyatt Earp, real or otherwise, always have overshadowed. Now, for the first time, Donald Chaput removes the eldest brother, Virgil Earp, from that shadow and tells in detail the story of the real leader of the Earp clan. As a peace officer in Prescott, Arizona, Virgil experienced his first street shootout, and it was there he met his f The exploits of Wyatt Earp, real or otherwise, always have overshadowed those of his brothers.

The exploits of Wyatt Earp, real or otherwise, always have overshadowed those of his brothers. Now, for the first time, Donald Chaput removes the eldest brother, Virgil Earp, from that shadow and tells in detail the story of the real leader of the Earp clan

The exploits of Wyatt Earp, real or otherwise, always have overshadowed those of his brothers. As a peace officer in Prescott, Arizona, Virgil experienced his first street shootout, and it was there he met his future nemesis, Johnny Behan.

The first book-length biography of Virgil Walter Earp, 1843-1905. Chalput traces the history of the Earps from the Prairie States to the Arizona Territory, sorting out truth from fiction. Inventory Number: 22485. Western Americana Wyatt Earp Biography Outlaws, Lawmen.

Most records of Virgil Earp stop here, but Chaput fleshes out the rest of Virgil's life in California, Nevada, and other western states as a peace officer, gambler, miner, Republican politician, and rancher.

Univ of Oklahoma Pr. Publication Date. Most records of Virgil Earp stop here, but Chaput fleshes out the rest of Virgil's life in California, Nevada, and other western states as a peace officer, gambler, miner, Republican politician, and rancher. Recommended By. Numerous educational institutions recommend us, including Oxford University, Michigan State University, and University of Minnesota.

Don Chaput, the author of Virgil Earp: Western Peace Officer, raises the possibility that Virgil served briefly with brother Wyatt on the Wichita police force in the mid-1870s. Wyatt Earp is known to have joined the Dodge City police force after that and to have been appointed assistant marshal in the Kansas cow town in May 1876. Virgil Earp was also in Dodge City, but whether he ever served as a peace officer is debatable.

Informationen zum Titel Virgil Earp von Donald Chaput Stuart Lake Pocket.

Informationen zum Titel Virgil Earp von Donald Chaput Peace officers, Southwest, New, . Local History – Western United States. Wyatt Earp: Frontier Marshal Stuart Lake Pocket, 1994 . Doc Holliday Robert K. Dearment (foreword), Karen Holliday Tanner University of Oklahoma Press, 2001 . John Ringo, King Of The Cowboys David Johnson University of North Texas Press, 2008 . The Earp Papers Don Chaput Affiliated Writers of America, 1994 .

Find nearly any book by Donald Chaput. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Virgil Earp: Western Peace Officer: ISBN 9780806128818 (978-0-8061-2881-8) Softcover, Univ of Oklahoma Pr, 1996. Founded in 1997, BookFinder.

Virgil Earp: Western Peace Officer, Donald Chaput, 1994, University of Oklahoma Press, ISBN 0-80612881-X. Arizona Highways: The Law of the Gun, Marshall Trimble, 1997, Arizona Department of Transportation, ISBN 16179-69-9. The Illustrated Life & Times of Wyatt Earp, Bob Boze Bell, 1994, Boze Books, ISBN 639549-4-6. The Illustrated Life & Times of Doc Holliday, Bob Boze Bell, 1994, Tri Star Boze Publications, In. ISBN 643343-0-5. Lees Ferry: From Mormon Crossing to National Park, .

Virgil Walter Earp (July 18, 1843 – October 19, 1905) was both deputy . Marshal and Tombstone, Arizona City Marshal when he led his brothers Morgan, Wyatt and Doc Holliday in a confrontation with outlaw Cowboys at the Gunfight at the . Corral on October 26, 1881. They killed brothers Tom and Frank McLaury and Billy Clanton. All three Earp brothers had been the target of repeated death threats made by the Cowboys who were upset by the Earps' interference in their illegal activities.

The exploits of Wyatt Earp, real or otherwise, always have overshadowed those of his brothers. Now, for the first time, Donald Chaput removes the eldest brother, Virgil Earp, from that shadow and tells in detail the story of the real leader of the Earp clan. As a peace officer in Prescott, Arizona, Virgil experienced his first street shootout, and it was there he met his future nemesis, Johnny Behan. In 1880 Virgil's brothers joined him in Tombstone, Arizona. Acting as both the town marshal of Tombstone and a U.S. deputy marshal, he led the Earp gang to the fateful gunfight at the O.K. Corral. Most records of Virgil Earp stop here, but Chaput fleshes out the rest of Virgil's life in California, Nevada, and other western states as a peace officer, gambler, miner, Republican politician, and rancher.
Comments: (7)
Nuadador
When one thinks about the Earp brothers of Tombstone fame, it tends to be about Wyatt Earp. Wanting to know more about the oldest brother, Virgil, a search came up on the book Virgil Earp: Western Peace Officer, by author Don Chaput. While the book was published in 1994, there are still new un-read hard-bounds in the market.

My knowledge of the Earp brothers was primarily obtained through movies and television. This book corrected much of that knowledge. As it turns out, Virgil and this reader have some things in common. We both grew up in Pella, Iowa; we both worked in Omaha; and we both moved to Arizona. Growing up in Pella, it was my understanding that Nick Earp, the boy’s father, was the town marshal. He was actually a farmer having obtaining a land grant for his military service. He owned a house in Pella, some lots, and of course the farm. He also was a Justice of the Peace.

After four years in Pella, they returned to Monmouth, Illinois, for better educational opportunities, since the elementary schools in Pella taught in Dutch. When they returned to Pella two years later, Virgil took courses at Central College. He eloped with Ellen Rysdam which angered her father, because he wanted her to marry a young Dutchman. Virgil had to leave Pella for three years in the Civil War. Shortly after, she gave birth to their daughter. Ellen’s father told her that Virgil was killed in the war and moved his family to Oregon.

The Earp’s moved around frequently like a group of gypsies. Each of the men had wanderlust. Virgil was the first to move to Arizona and eventually moved from Prescott to Tombstone and Wyatt and Morgan followed. What was a surprise, was that it was Virgil who was the town marshal as well as a Deputy United States Marshal. On that fateful day at the OK Corral, Virgil had deputized his two brothers, as well as Doc Holliday. A few months later, an assassin shot Virgil as he came onto the street at night, causing him the loss of his left arm.

Don Chaput did a fine job researching the life of Virgil. He paints an interesting picture of the life that Virgil and his brothers lived following Tombstone until his death. While this reader has been to Tombstone numerous times, after reading this book a return road-trip is much needed. It is also interesting in this current day of politics, that politics existed so long ago in Tombstone. The Tombstone Epitaph was Republican and supported the Earp’s, of which Virgil was a Republican. The Tombstone Nugget newspaper was Democrat and supported the cowboys, especially the Clanton’s and the McLaury’s. Somethings don’t change over time!
in waiting
The life of Virgil Earp was one of pure grit, courage, honor, strength and love of family. The physical and mental suffering that he endured after being shot on several occasions and accused of all sorts of lies by his enemies throughout his life is far greater than most any man could have survived, but somehow he did. He must have taken all of his brother Wyatt's bullets, because, remarkably, none found their mark. After surviving the war, shootouts, brutal and cowardly assassinations, Virgil still was able to walk this earth with a badge on his chest, even with only one good arm, until the day he died with his boots off. He is the true embodiment of an American hero who never got the fame and recognition he deserved. At least this book gives us a brief look at what true grit really is.
Ceroelyu
Having read numerous books and articles about Wyatt Earp, Tombstone and the Gunfight behind the O.K. Corral, I agree with the author that Virgil Earp deserves much more historical recognition than he has been given. This book is an easy read and provides an excellent biographical history of the Earp family leading up to the Tombstone years. It also presents strong evidence that Virgil, not Wyatt, was viewed by his contemporaries as the chief law enforcement officer during those turbulant times. His life did not end after Tombstone and the book provides a much needed glimpse into the final years of this often forgotten lawman.
Kulalas
Interesting story about an interesting man.
Ffrlel
my husband loved it
Akinohn
This was interesting reading, since Virgil was really the major peace officer in Tombstone during the OK Corral shootout, and never got the notoriety of his brother Wyatt. I'd recommend this to anyone who's a westrn history buff.
Kegal
Many books have been written about Tombstone, the ‘Gunfight at the OK Corral’, Wyatt Earp, and Doc Holiday; and, in most instances, Virgil Earp is portrayed as an incidental character. This is particularly true of earlier books, in which there is a great deal of confusion regarding Virgil and Wyatt; with Wyatt frequently assuming Virgil’s credentials (In particular, Marshall of Tombstone). This, I suspect, was neither Wyatt’s nor Virgil’s intention or fault. Most likely it was (is) due to the newspaper accounts of Wyatt’s ‘Vendetta Ride,’ following the assassination attempt on Virgil’s life and the murder of their younger brother, Morgan. The ‘Gunfight at the OK Corral’ and the ‘Vendetta Ride’ catapulted Wyatt to national prominence while Virgil, on both occasions, was recuperating from his wounds.

Newspaper readers of the time surely had good reason to be confused, as did subsequent Western authors when reading those accounts. The news stories generally referred either to ‘Marshall Earp’ or simply to ‘Earp’. And, since Wyatt was the primary subject of the news --- both at the inquest following the gunfight near the OK Corral and the Vendetta Ride --- it was easy to conclude that these were references to Wyatt, rather than to his older brother. This clearly did a great disservice to Virgil.

As a result, it’s fun to theorize as to what might have been if Wyatt had been maimed, instead of Virgil. Would Virgil have gone off on the rampaging Vendetta Ride? And, if so, would he now be the Western hero that Wyatt is said to be? We’ll never know.

In any event: based on this reading, Virgil Earp had a long and successful career as a lawman and should be given all the credit he deserves. Strangely enough, however, most of it occurred after he was crippled and left Tombstone, while the bulk of Wyatt’s career as a lawman took place before the Vendetta ride. Perhaps that’s why Virgil is lesser known.

Bottom line: This is a well-researched biography of a fine Western lawman who up-until-now has never gotten the recognition he deserves. The book also puts him and a lot of the happenings in Tombstone in better perspective and by doing so clarifies greatly the events leading to the ‘Gunfight at the OK Corral.’ In addition, it tells us a lot about what happened to Virgil and his family after they got to California. It’s a great book which should have been written years ago. So, if you’re interested in Western history, I suggest you read it.