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by Catrine Clay

eBook King, Kaiser, Tsar: Three Royal Cousins Who Led the World to War download ISBN: 0802716237
Author: Catrine Clay
Publisher: Walker Books; 1st edition (July 10, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 432
ePub: 1204 kb
Fb2: 1649 kb
Rating: 4.5
Other formats: mobi docx txt lrf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Historical

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At every point in her remarkable book, Catrine Clay sheds new light on a watershed period in world history. Publisher: Walker Books. War in Social Thought: Hobbes to the Present. Princeton University Press. Hans Joas, Wolfgang Knöbl.

Did sibling rivalry lead to the slaughter that was World War I? This psychobiography makes a good case . King, Kaiser, Tsar is her third book, resulting from her documentary of the same title. She is married and lives in London with her three children.

Did sibling rivalry lead to the slaughter that was World War I? This psychobiography makes a good case in the affirmative. BBC documentarian Clay delivers only a bit of news, but lights up some of the.

This work is a co-publication of The World Bank and the United Nations. and tinnitus associated with service in the Armed Forces since World War II. The resulting book, "No. DoD. US Combatting Cyber. Absolute Key To Occult Science, The Tarot Of The Bohemians. 56 MB·71,354 Downloads·New!. He's Not That Complicated™ PDF, eBook by Sabrina Alexis & Eric Charles. 48 MB·705 Downloads·New! In 1998, in response to the growing concerns that many returning Gulf War veterans began reporting.

King, Kaiser, Tsar book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking King, Kaiser, Tsar: Three Royal Cousins Who Led The World To War as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking King, Kaiser, Tsar: Three Royal Cousins Who Led The World To War as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Author Catrine Clay takes the documentary that she did, and expands it into a scholarly . I learned a great deal from this book. The King, Kaiser and Tsar were a powerful trio of cousins who had a tremendous impact on the world

Author Catrine Clay takes the documentary that she did, and expands it into a scholarly study of the three men involved, and their families. While this is a topic that has been very well covered in other works, Clay takes the interesting step of exploring the childhoods, education and familial ties between the three men to see how Europe and eventually the United States were on an inevitable path to conflict. The King, Kaiser and Tsar were a powerful trio of cousins who had a tremendous impact on the world. This book does a good job of explaining the familial and political conflicts that led these 3 men to have a tremendous effect on the world.

They saw themselves as royal colleagues, a trade union of kings, standing shoulder to shoulder against the rise of socialism, republicanism, and revolution.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. They saw themselves as royal colleagues, a trade union of kings, standing shoulder to shoulder against the rise of socialism, republicanism, and revolution. And yet tensions abounded between them.

British historian Catrine Clay has told their fascinating story in this new triple biography of the rulers and the world they . I think the subtitle of this book, "Three Royal Cousins Who Led The World To War" is a bit misleading

British historian Catrine Clay has told their fascinating story in this new triple biography of the rulers and the world they lost in the guns of August, 1914. It was in that fateful autumn that the long 19th century of peace in Europe ended with the horrific beginning of the Great War which would claim 10 million lives and over 20 million casualties. I think the subtitle of this book, "Three Royal Cousins Who Led The World To War" is a bit misleading. We're dealing with three monarchs who happen to be cousins: the King of England, the German Kaiser, and the Russian Tsar.

The extraordinary family story of George V, Wilhelm II, and Nicholas II: they were tied to one another by history, and history would ultimately tear them apart.

Known among their families as Georgie, Willy, and Nicky, they were, respectively, the royal cousins George V of England, Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, and Nicholas II of Russia―the first two grandsons of Queen Victoria, the latter her grandson by marriage. In 1914, on the eve of world war, they controlled the destiny of Europe and the fates of millions of their subjects. The outcome and their personal endings are well known―Nicky shot with his family by the Bolsheviks, Willy in exile in Holland, Georgie still atop his throne. Largely untold, however, is the family saga that played such a pivotal role in bringing the world to the precipice.

Drawing widely on previously unpublished royal letters and diaries, made public for the first time by Queen Elizabeth II, Catrine Clay chronicles the riveting half century of the royals' overlapping lives, and their slow, inexorable march into conflict. They met frequently from childhood, on holidays, and at weddings, birthdays, and each others' coronations. They saw themselves as royal colleagues, a trade union of kings, standing shoulder to shoulder against the rise of socialism, republicanism, and revolution. And yet tensions abounded between them.

Clay deftly reveals how intimate family details had deep historical significance: the antipathy Willy's mother (Victoria's daughter) felt toward him because of his withered left arm, and how it affected him throughout his life; the family tension caused by Otto von Bismarck's annexation of Schleswig and Holstein from Denmark (Georgie's and Nicky's mothers were Danish princesses); the surreality surrounding the impending conflict. "Have I gone mad?" Nicholas asked his wife, Alexandra, in July 1914, showing her another telegram from Wilhelm. "What on earth does Willy mean pretending that it still depends on me whether war is averted or not?" Germany had, in fact, declared war on Russia six hours earlier. At every point in her remarkable book, Catrine Clay sheds new light on a watershed period in world history.

Comments: (7)
Xwnaydan
Absolutely excellent follow up to Rohl's biography of Kaiser Wilhem II. I highly recommend it with its insightful portraits of the different personalities involved in the run up to WWI. Once one has an understanding of Wilhem, who seems to be mostly a stick figure in history, the interplay among the three cousins shows how truly deadly their interpersonal relationships and individual characters (or lack of them) had the consequences that they did. I found it very interesting to see how badly many Germans wanted a constitutional monarchy and what a real disaster Wilhelm was. That also was a part of European history of which I was completely unaware: the great desire for governments modeled on the British and American examples existed throughout the major European countries during the l9th century. It makes Prince Albert's premature death so much more poignant with the affect that his absence had on the developments within his extended family. These are definitely good books for amateur historians who want to round out their comprehension of history without spending a lifetime in original documents.
Thorgahuginn
Over the years, I've discovered that reading history is just about as fun as reading fiction. More often than not, the most fantastical things happen in the real world that most writers wouldn't dream of putting into a novel -- they'd be laughed at as being 'unrealistic' or 'over the top.' Looking at the history of Europe as seen through the eyes of its monarchs, it's nearly unbelievable that these three men, all related together, and who wrote affectionate letters to each other, would launch one of the bloodiest conflicts in human history -- the first World War.

Author Catrine Clay takes the documentary that she did*, and expands it into a scholarly study of the three men involved, and their families. While this is a topic that has been very well covered in other works, Clay takes the interesting step of exploring the childhoods, education and familial ties between the three men to see how Europe and eventually the United States were on an inevitable path to conflict. It's an intriguing premise.

All three of the cousins were related either by marriage or by blood to one another, and less than a decade would separate them in age. Of the three, one would manage to survive WWI and stay on his throne, one would die in exile after being ousted from his throne, and the third would be murdered. Each one would face unique difficulties, and each one had a spouse that would influence their direction in life.

The eldest of the three was the Kaiser, Wilhelm II, or as he was known in the family, Willy. The eldest grandson of England's Queen Victoria, Willy had a less than amiable relationship with his parents, Fritz of Prussia, and Victoria, England's Princess Royal. Born with a crippled left arm from complications, Willy grew up with a determination to succeed, and a craving need of approval from his parents, made all the worse by a mental struggle that centered around his identity -- was he German or English? Surrounded by flatterers, distained by his English relations for his bad manners (at his uncle Bertie's wedding, he bit one of his uncles on the leg), Willy lacked the social skills to successfully navigate through the tact that being a ruler in early twentieth century Europe, and the wisdom to know when to back off.

The middle one was the King, George, whom no one had expected to become king. His elder brother Eddy was trained to become King of England, and ruler of the British Empire, but was rather slow-witted; Georgie was expected to be supportive, and was destined to join the Royal Navy -- indeed, he loved serving in the Navy, proving himself to be a capable leader of men. While he certainly wasn't a brilliant mind, he did have the capacity to learn, and when his elder brother suddenly died, Georgie, as he was known, was in the direct line for the throne. Not only did he inherit the destiny of a crown, he also inherited a bride -- Princess May of Teck, a woman who was determined and steadfast, and would prove to be just the right wife for him. Unlike his two cousins, George was to a constitutional monarch, not welding true political power, but he would have an enormous influence on the public.

And the third one was the Tsar, Nicholas II. His mother and George's mother were sisters -- Alexandra and Dagmar of Denmark. Alix would marry the future Edward VII of England, and was considered the most beautiful princess in Europe. Dagmar -- or Minnie, as she was known -- was the clever one, and was able to enchant both her husband, Alexander III of Russia, and the Russian people, around her tiny fingers. She and Alix also shared the trait of wanting to keep their children as children for as long as possible. Unfortunately for Russia, this was the case especially with her eldest son, Nicky. History has painted him as a dull weakling, unable to stand up to anyone, and dominated by his wife -- Alix of Hesse. A great deal has been written about Nicholas and his family, some of it very good, and a great deal very average, and Clay pretty much does a retread here. But one aspect that I found very interesting and new is that Nicholas was anything but stupid -- he had problems with being decisive, and had a genuine urge to please people, but the letters and comments that he wrote show that he had a smart brain inside of that head. Like Georgie, he detested cousin Willy, and the king and the tsar would remain the very best of friends throughout their lives.

How all of this plays out is what makes this book so interesting. Clay takes the time to describe the experiences these men and their families shared, and the wider political repercussions that it would bring about. Most interesting was the emphasis set on Wilhelm II, and his personal life. I had no idea of his latent homosexuality and how scandal would shake up his regime, nor that he suffered from mental breakdowns. It's this that divides this study from the usual collections about European royalty.

Clay's writing is very clear, and full of detail, making this a very enjoyable read. To untangle the relationships, there is a genealogical chart, and an insert of black and white photographs. Both the index and the bibliography are extensive and worthy of further exploration. For those who are interested in the history of Europe before WWI and some of the causes of that conflict, or are just interested in the lives of Royals, this is worth finding.

Four stars overall. Recommended.
Uris
The last chapters are more relevant, the first ones are filled with small talk and are very lengthy.
Najinn
Great information that sometimes is not written in other books. Castilla
I_LOVE_228
I learned a great deal from this book. The King, Kaiser and Tsar were a powerful trio of cousins who had a tremendous impact on the world. This book does a good job of explaining the familial and political conflicts that led these 3 men to have a tremendous effect on the world. It is enlightening and educational.
zmejka
Way too much emphasis on the personal letters, which I understand most people want to read, but overall a huge glimpse into the family , the FAMILY that was Europe. Amazing that the belligerents are all related in world war 1
Mr_TrOlOlO
I read history--academic as well as "popular" histories--for fun. I say this to establish that I'm not put off by weighty tomes. This book was not particularly weighty. It was just extremely disjointed in its narrative. The prose does not flow at all, making reading it a chore.

Added to that difficulty, there is a lack of footnotes in the text, a deficiency I find troublesome in a history.

The Kindle version presents its own challenges. Words like "of" are italicized for no reason. The ampersand--frequently used by King George in his writings--is often displayed as "8c" in several sentences, then correctly shown as "&" in the same quotation. Apostrophes are inconsistently displayed--sometimes missing, sometimes present, and sometimes rendered as something else (as when "Alexander's" was turned into "Alexander Us"...repeatedly.) And ending punctuation, especially periods, were often missing. Reading often became a chore of trying to decipher the text.

All in all, I much preferred Miranda Carter's treatment of the same subject, in her book "George, Nicholas and Wilhelm."
When I got this book in very good condition and in a timely manner I immediately started to read it and I haven't put it down since. Good insight and a fast paced page turner reads like a novel but what you are reading is history-who needs soap operas when you have these three men and their families!! If you are looking for a different view point to how World War I started this is your book. Enjoy meeting the King, the Kaiser and the Tsar it will keep you on your toes in trying to remember who is all related to whom but very interesting book.