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by Fatima Bhutto

eBook Songs of Blood and Sword: A Daughter's Memoir download ISBN: 1568586329
Author: Fatima Bhutto
Publisher: Nation Books; 1 edition (September 28, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 496
ePub: 1994 kb
Fb2: 1714 kb
Rating: 4.1
Other formats: mbr lrf txt lrf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Historical

An acclaimed poet and journalist, Fatima Bhutto writes for the Daily Beast, Guardian, and New Statesman.

An acclaimed poet and journalist, Fatima Bhutto writes for the Daily Beast, Guardian, and New Statesman. She lives in Karachi. In generation after generation a Bhutto family member,though coming from a famous aristocratic and feudal family, has risen to the heights of political power, and then been assassinated. The author obviously is most proud of her father, who was Prime Minister at one time, until assassinated by Benazir and her husband, Zardari. Her father, Zulfikar, was the head of the "PPP" political party, the "People's Party of Pakistan", though it might have been named "The Socialist Party of Pakistan".

Songs of Blood and Sword is a memoir written by Fatima Bhutto. The book recounts author's father, Murtaza Bhutto's murder by the Pakistani police in Karachi in 1996, when she was a teenager of 14 years old. The story covers the events, she saw through her eyes in her young lifetime. The book chronicles the tragic life of a family of rich feudal landlords – the Bhutto family of Pakistan

Start by marking Songs of Blood and Sword: A Daughter's .

Start by marking Songs of Blood and Sword: A Daughter's Memoir as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. 1. The book is a memoir,written by a girl part of the famous political hierarchy- 'The Bhuttos'.

The faculty and administration at Christ Church were sympathetic, having already educated a fair number of his family ull-time, he received a letter.

The faculty and administration at Christ Church were sympathetic, having already educated a fair number of his family ull-time, he received a letter from Professor Ian Stephens: ‘I write to offer you sympathy, and support if needed. You must be having a horrible time.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 443-457) and index. The author-whose father, Murtaza Bhutto, was murdered when she was just fourteen years old-tells the story of her political Pakistani family, from their roots as feudal landlords to their rise as political powerbrokers, as she tries to uncover the truth about her father's life and death.

It is a book about a family and nation riven by murder, corruption, conspiracy and division, written by one who has lived it, in the heart of the storm. In September 1996, a fourteen-year-old Fatima Bhutto hid in a windowless dressing room, shielding her baby brother while shots rang out in the streets outside the family home in Karachi. This was the evening that her father Murtaza was murdered, along with six of his associates.

Published by the Penguin Group.

Benazir Bhutto and Asif Ali Zardari are blamed for the killing of Mir Murtaza in this explosive memoir, discovers Roderick Matthews. Fatima Bhutto was 14 years old when her father, Mir Murtaza, was shot dead by police after a gun battle outside his Karachi home in 1996

Benazir Bhutto and Asif Ali Zardari are blamed for the killing of Mir Murtaza in this explosive memoir, discovers Roderick Matthews. Fatima Bhutto was 14 years old when her father, Mir Murtaza, was shot dead by police after a gun battle outside his Karachi home in 1996. In clear and unpretentious prose it gives a vivid impression of the brutal and corrupt world of Pakistani power politics, which has resulted in the violent deaths of four members of the Bhutto dynasty in the past 31 years. Murtaza's adult life, we learn, was dominated by two great causes.

In September 1996, fourteen-year-old Fatima Bhutto hid in a windowless dressing room, shielding her .

In September 1996, fourteen-year-old Fatima Bhutto hid in a windowless dressing room, shielding her baby brother, while shots rang out in the dark outside the family home in Karachi. This was the night her father Murtaza was murdered. It was the latest in a long line of tragedies for one of the world's best-known political dynasties. Songs of Blood and Sword tells the story of a family of feudal landlords who became powerbrokers.

In September 1996, fourteen-year-old Fatima Bhutto hid in a windowless dressing room, shielding her baby brother, while shots rang out in the dark outside the family home in Karachi. This was the night her father Murtaza was murdered. It was the latest in a long line of tragedies for one of the world's best-known political dynasties.

Songs of Blood and Sword tells the story of a family of feudal landlords who became powerbrokers. It is an epic tale of intrigue, the making of modern Pakistan, and ultimately, tragedy. A searing testament to a troubled land, Songs of Blood and Sword reveals a daughter's love for her father and her search to uncover the truth of his life and death.

Comments: (7)
Helo
Fatima Bhutto's memoir of her father is a very well written, riveting and commendable effort. Her descriptions of inter-personal interactions with her father leave no doubts as to how close their relationship was. She captures the momentum of changes in Pakistan and ties it well with Murtaza's life - by the end of which you can not help but root for her father. The author should also be commended on writing about events extremely personal and tragic - to an extent that most of us can't fathom. Her descriptions of the significant tragedies of her life are heart wrenching and give the reader a pause. There were times when I had to put down the book and distract myself - because I couldn't imagine these things happening with me and my father - it was impossible to place myself in Fatima's shoes. I am the same age as the author - and as she chronicles her journey and the events of Pakistan, I couldn't help but think just how different (and ordinary yet lucky ?) my life was compared to hers.

The book served as a view into Pakistan for me. Being an Indian and from Mumbai, I had taken it personally to better understand this country - that at one time - was one with India and in its people, culture and customs - still shares my country's fiber and is yet for the last 6 decades an enemy that we are unable to reconcile with. I am glad to have read this book - for it now gives Pakistan a flesh and blood - realistic experiences to tie with - making it impossible to hate or be apathetic to.

However, there are parts in which the book lacks - understandably so - mainly in criticism of Murtaza - at failing to see the futility of an armed struggle - or given his choice of embracing it - his failure to understand its implications upon his perception as a terrorist. I would highly recommend this book to anyone who would like to know more about Pakistan and about the Bhuttos - it serves in no small measure as a warning to the ability of power to corrupt and bring tragedies in the lives of those who seek it.

- Sanket
Trash Obsession
I just finished this book, which is available cheaply second-hand on amazon. It isn't a very easy read, not because the author isn't a good writer (she is) but because the Bhutto family's history is so complicated.

In generation after generation a Bhutto family member,though coming from a famous aristocratic and feudal family, has risen to the heights of political power, and then been assassinated.

The author obviously is most proud of her father, who was Prime Minister at one time, until assassinated by Benazir and her husband, Zardari. Her father, Zulfikar, was the head of the "PPP" political party, the "People's Party of Pakistan", though it might have been named "The Socialist Party of Pakistan". Zulfikar was an enemy of America, and a pal of Arafat, Bashir and Gadaffi. Fatima studied in England and America, and speaks perfect Oxford English, and doesn't betray her own polical leanings.

With all of the current news coming out of Pakistan, it only makes one glad to be American. (And I thought things HERE were bad!)
Togor
An utterly spellbinding book, full of breathtaking facts and mindboggling anecdotes about Pakistan's sordid political culture. Written with great style and authenticity, Fatima Bhutto is a truly gifted author who unerringly documents the corrupt and vengeful leadership of her star-crossed country. And she does this with enormous thought and sensitivity.

The book itself is one of those rare and priceless page-turners, capturing your interest from the very first page until the very last. The literary craftsmanship is extraordinary, carrying the reader perpetually astonished and engrossed though its contents.

The author's emotional engagement in this captivating story has a bracing effect on the reader. I was both moved and inspired by her narrative. The evidence she presents implicating the current Pakistani president Asif Zardari and his deceased wife, the previous prime minister Benazir Bhutto, in the murder of the author's father, Mir Murtaza Bhutto, is convincingly delivered and speaks for itself.

But for the great danger involved, I wish Fatima Bhutto would enter Pakistani politics and clean its Augean stables like her father had hoped to do before he died. I highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a great read.
Galanjov
The Bhutto family is intensely controversial. There is here undoubtedly a skewed perspective against Benazir Bhutto (her aunt) and for her father (Murtaza), but it worth reading to learn more about the inherent controversy about and within the Bhutto family. She clearly does not turn a critical eye towards her father or grandfather, and probably a too-critical eye towards her aunt, but reading this book should be seen as an important alternative view to the many defenders of Benazir Bhutto. If you have read Benazir's books, this book will give you pause for thought, and encourage you to read more to find the truth about Pakistan and the Bhutto family. So read, but read with an open and critical eye.
Pruster
Fatima tends to follow her aunt Benazir Bhutto in dramatizing and romanticizing but it is definitely worth while reading and helps to understand events in her family