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by David Hardiman

eBook Gandhi in his Time and Ours: The Global Legacy of his Ideas download ISBN: 1869140346
Author: David Hardiman
Publisher: University Of KwaZulu-Natal Press (March 1, 2004)
Language: English
Pages: 368
ePub: 1646 kb
Fb2: 1806 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: lrf mobi lrf docx
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Historical

Kaushik Bagchi History).

Kaushik Bagchi History). Hardiman's volume is an extremely valuable addition to the already voluminous literature on Gandhi, offering to the novice a rich introduction to the man and his work and to the expert a series of thought-provoking arguments and insights. Stephen P. Blake Journal of Asian Studies).

Hardiman examines Gandhi's ways of conducting his conflicts with all these groups, as well as with his critics on the left and representatives of the Dalits. He also explores another key issue in Gandhi's life and legacy: his ideas about and attitudes toward women. Despite inconsistencies and limitations, and failures in his personal life, Gandhi has become a beacon for posterity.

By David Hardiman Gandhi in His Time and Ours: The Global Legacy of His Ideas. New York: Columbia University Press, 2003. Volume 64 Issue 1 - Stephen P. Blake. Volume 76 Issue 1 - Di Wang. University of California Press, 2011).

David Hardiman, who lived for many years in Gandhi's home region ofGujerat, is based at the University of Warwick. He is a founding member of the Subaltern Studies group. His books include "Peasant Nationalists of Gujarat, 1917-1934," "The Coming of the Devi: Adivasi Assertion in Western India," and "Feeding the Baniya: Peasants and Usurers in Western India.

Gandhi was the creator of a radical style of politics that has proved effective in fighting insidious social divisions .

David Hardiman shows that it was based on a larger vision of an alternative society .

David Hardiman, who lived for many years in Gandhi's home region of. Gujerat, is based at the University of Warwick. His books include "Peasant Nationalists of Gujarat, 1917-1934," "The Coming of the Devi: Adivasi Assertion in Western India," and "Feeding the Baniya: Peasants and Usurers in Western India

May 15, 2019 History. the global legacy of his ideas.

May 15, 2019 History. Gandhi in his time and ours. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Gandhi in his time and ours from your list? Gandhi in his time and ours. Published 2003 by Columbia University Press in New York.

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His inconsistencies, mistakes and failures (as husband and father) are carefully scrutinised. Hardiman's effort is to show that Gandhi, despite his limitations, provides a beacon because of the uncompromising honesty of his political life and moral activism. Finally, there is Gandhi's enduring legacy: Jayaprakash Narayan, Medha Patkar, Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela and Petra Kelly are discussed. This book examines Gandhi as the creator of a radical style of politics. It argues that whereas politicians garner support by demonising those they oppose, Gandhi resisted such a politics. He asserted that there are always grounds for a fruitful dialogue between opponents.

Students are assigned to read David Hardiman, Gandhi in His Time and Ours: The Global Legacy of His Ideas (New York: Columbia University Press, 2003), ch. 4 ("An Alternative Modernity"). In class, students form small groups (4-6 students each) to discuss one of the two following sets of questions: To what extent was Gandhi's vision ('constructive programme') for India Romantic (or 'arcadian', to use Worster's term)? To what extent was it modern, if at all?

Mahatma Gandhi created a radical style of politics that has proved effective in fighting social divisions within India and elsewhere. What vision produced this new form of politics? Hardiman shows that it was based on Gandhi's larger conception of an alternative society, a human collective that emphasises mutual respect, resistance to exploitation, non-violence and ecological harmony. In its practice, this personal vision sought to include Gandhi's opponents. From representatives of the British Raj to Indian advocates of violent resistance, from right-wing religious leaders to upholders of caste privilege, Gandhi confronted entrenched groups and their more entrenched ideologies with a deceptively simple ethic of resistance. Hardiman examines Gandhi's ways of conducting his conflicts with all these groups, as well as with his critics on the left and representatives of India's underclass, the Dalits. He also explores another key issue in Gandhi's life and legacy with crucial resonance for our own time: his ideas about and attitudes toward women. Despite the failures in his personal life, Gandhi has become a beacon of peace and strength for posterity.
Comments: (2)
Dianazius
This is a study of Gandhi's ideas and their interpretations. Hardiman has provided a clear and succinct analysis of the application of Gandhian principles in independent India and in the global stage. This book is a comprehensive assessment of Gandhi's influence on social movements all around the world. A pleasant and inspiring reading.
Velellan
For many years David Hardiman has been a leading scholar of the Indian peasantry. Now he has written his view of Gandhi and his politics. The Gandhi he presents is ultimately a man of high moral courage. But this is not to say that Hardiman has no disagreements with him. In his opinion Gandhi presented a "dialogic" vision, emphasizing tolerance and diversity of opinions. Hardiman then discusses such subjects as Gandhi's views on nationalism, the origins of his non-violent resistance, his criticisms of modernity, his views on sex and the family, his attitude towards the untouchables and the "tribal" minorities, his campaigns against religious hatred, the fate of Gandhian politics after his death, and the influence of Gandhi on the wider world.

What can we say about such a work? There are some flaws. The use of Bakhtin to support Gandhi's "dialogic" stance is a bit fasionable. The fact that Hindi Swarj is written in a dialogue does not necessarily mean much for its open-mindedness. After all, both Plato and Galileo used dialogues, but they both clearly meant to express one particular viewpoint. Hardiman says Gandhi supported Polish resistance in the second world war, but the reference is to a secondary source. Indeed, there is no systematic discussion of the Second World War, surely the acid test for any pacifist. The discussion of Gandhi's international influence is also weak, looking as it does at Petra Kelly, Martin Luther King, and others, including, somewhat oddly, Malcolm X. Hardiman's scholarship is rather thin here, relying on Stephen Oates' biography of King to discuss the American civil rights movement, and ignoring such key scholars as Dittmer, Garrow, Sugrue and many others. The concentration on individuals may lead many to ask whether non-violent resistance is better at saving the souls of its leaders than achieving its goals. The material preconditions for successful non-violent resistance are never really explored.

At the same time, however, Hardiman provides much useful information. Who would have known that Gandhi's assasin twice tried to kill him in 1944, and both times Gandhi allowed him to go free? Many people know that in South Africa Gandhi offered his services to the British during their wars. But Hardiman also points out how appalled Gandhi was when he learned that the British were callously torturing and killing Africans in the Zulu rebellion. Hardiman also uses his past experience in subaltern studies to provide useful historical background. We learn of the Indian origins of such non-violent practices as haunting the doorsteps of debtors and threatening suicide. We also learn of how Gandhi encouraged civil disobedience among women, and also the limited effect this had on Indian gender relations. Particularly helpful is his discussion of the struggles of the untouchables and the tribal communities, and Gandhi's varying, but increasingly supportive, reaction to them. We learn of how Gandhi supported tolerance and respect for other people's faiths, and we learn of a group of Muslims who adapted Gandhian methods to resist their exploitive communal leaders. We also learn about Gandhian politics after 1948. It is not an encouraging story. Gandhians tried to encourage landowners to donate land to the village as a whole. Many landowners made this promise (requiring a minimum of a fortieth of the village land) and TIME magazine praised it as an alternative to Communism, but few kept their promises. Gandhians also split over the 1975 State of Emergency. One leader supported Indira Gandhi's use of nuclear weapons, while the other leader, J.P. Narayan, formed a broad based movement against Gandhi's government, which unfortunately helped to indulge and legitimize the Hindu right.

Hardiman's portrait of Gandhi is a complex one. It is important to remember that Gandhi was more the Mendelssohn of Hinudism, rather than the Spinoza. Hardiman points out that while Gandhi was always hostile to untouchability he thought that caste could be worked with. Hardiman also points out that he became more liberal as time went on: where once he supported marriages only within castes, by the forties he encouraged Hindu girls to marry untouchables. Hardiman notes that Gandhi could be too indulgent towards Hinduism, but also points out that the Hindu right cannot (and often does not) claim him as a spokesman. Hardiman also discusses Gandhi's patriarchal attitude, and how his family suffered for his abstemious and dogmatic beliefs. He even went so far to suggest that fathers would be right to murder their raped "dishonored" daughters. But to view Gandhi as a life-denying asectic ignores his wit, his generosity, his open-mindedness and willingness to change his views. We can see this in his changing attitudes towards caste, ecumenism, and the tribal communities. Once mass rape erupted with partition, he pleaded with fathers to forgive their daughters. And, of course, there were his fasts in order to stop mass communal violence. For this and for other noble and heroic acts, he was foully murdered by a Hindu bigot.