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eBook Journey to a Revolution: A Personal Memoir and History of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 download

by Michael Korda

eBook Journey to a Revolution: A Personal Memoir and History of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 download ISBN: 0060772611
Author: Michael Korda
Publisher: Harper; First Edition edition (September 19, 2006)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1437 kb
Fb2: 1282 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi doc rtf lit
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Historical

Journey to a Revolution by Michael Korda is a must read for people, like myself, whose parents are Hungarian refugees. Every book written about the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 offers a different perspective: some are more political, some more eye-witness and personal

Journey to a Revolution by Michael Korda is a must read for people, like myself, whose parents are Hungarian refugees. Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase. Yes, there are factual errors. once you get past them and remember this more memoir than historical text, its quite enjoyable reading. Every book written about the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 offers a different perspective: some are more political, some more eye-witness and personal. I was especially affected by the involvement of the young people in that Revolution.

Journey to a Revolution book. The spontaneous rising of Hungarian people against the Hungarian communist The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 was not just an extraordinary and dramatic event-perhaps the most dramatic single event of the Cold War-but, as we can now see fifty years later, a major turning point in history.

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Journey to a Revolution: A Personal Memoir and History of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 электрондық кітабы, Michael Korda. Бұл кітапты компьютерде, Android және iOS құрылғыларында Google Play Books қолданбасы арқылы оқуыңызға болады. Journey to a Revolution: A Personal Memoir and History of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 атты кітапты офлайн режимінде оқу үшін жүктеп алыңыз, мәтінді бөлектеңіз, бетбелгі қойыңыз және белгілеңіз.

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 (Hungarian: 1956-os forradalom), or the Hungarian Uprising, was a nationwide revolution against the Hungarian People's Republic and its Soviet-imposed policies, lasting from 23 October until 10 November 1956

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 (Hungarian: 1956-os forradalom), or the Hungarian Uprising, was a nationwide revolution against the Hungarian People's Republic and its Soviet-imposed policies, lasting from 23 October until 10 November 1956. Leaderless at the beginning, it was the first major threat to Soviet control since the Red Army drove Nazi Germany from its territory at the End of World War II in Europe.

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 was perhaps the most dramatic single event of the Cold War and a major turning point in. .Journey to a Revolution : A Personal Memoir and History of the Hungarian Revolution of 1956.

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 was perhaps the most dramatic single event of the Cold War and a major turning point in history.

In October 1956, Michael Korda and three fellow Oxford undergraduates traveled to Budapest in a. Though it ended unsuccessfully, the spontaneous uprising of Hungarians against their country's Communist party and the Soviet occupation forces in the wake of Stalin's death demonstrated to the world at large the failure of Communism.

Journey to a Revolution" is at once a history and a compelling memoir, the story of four twenty-four year old Oxford undergraduates who took off for Budapest in a beat-up old Volkswagon convertible in October 1956, to bring.

Journey to a Revolution" is at once a history and a compelling memoir, the story of four twenty-four year old Oxford undergraduates who took off for Budapest in a beat-up old Volkswagon convertible in October 1956, to bring badly needed medicine to the Budapest hospitals and to participate, at street level, in one of the great, heroic battes of post-war.

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956 was not just an extraordinary and dramatic event—perhaps the most dramatic single event of the Cold War—but, as we can now see fifty years later, a major turning point in history. Here is an eyewitness account, in the tradition of George Orwell's Homage to Catalonia.

The spontaneous rising of Hungarian people against the Hungarian communist party and the Soviet forces in Hungary in the wake of Stalin's death, while ending unsuccessfully, demonstrated to the world at large the failure of Communism. The Russians were obliged to use force on a vast scale against armed students, factory workers, and intellectuals in the streets of a major European capital to restore the Hungarian communist party to power. For two weeks, students, women, and teenagers fought tanks in the streets of Budapest, in full view of the Western media—and therefore the world—and for a time they actually won, deeply humiliating the men who succeeded Stalin. The Russians eventually managed to extinguish the revolution with brute force and overwhelming numbers, but never again would they attempt to use military force on a large scale to suppress dissent in their Eastern European empire.

Told with brilliant detail, suspense, occasional humor, and sustained anger, Journey to a Revolution is at once history and a compelling memoir—the amazing story of four young Oxford undergraduates, including the author, who took off for Budapest in a beat-up old Volkswagen convertible in October 1956 to bring badly needed medicine to Budapest hospitals and to participate, at street level, in one of the great battles of postwar history. Michael Korda paints a vivid and richly detailed picture of the events and the people; explores such major issues as the extent to which the British and American intelligence services were involved in the uprising, making the Hungarians feel they could expect military support from the West; and describes, day by day, the course of the revolution, from its heroic beginnings to the sad martyrdom of its end.

Journey to a Revolution delivers "a harrowing and horrifying tale told in spare and poignant prose—sometimes bitter, sometimes ironic, always powerful."*

* Kirkus Reviews (starred)

Comments: (7)
Urreur
This is a spell-binding book. And really, there is nothing quite like an eye-witness account… I was drawn to this book like a magnet because of its personal significance for me.

The sequelae of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution of course, amongst other issues resulted in me being born in Australia & not in Hungary. (My parents were amongst those 200,000 Hungarian refugees who fled or escaped before the iron curtain well & truly came down for the next three decades). This of course resulted in me being cut off from my relatives because I was born in the antipodes (aka: Australia). & if history had been otherwise, would have been my culture.

Be warned, once you pick it up - you will find it very difficult to put down! If the word irony, ever needed to apply anywhere, then it can be said that the biggest irony is that at the time of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution, Austria was completely free of the Russians, that is, it had ceased to be occupied by the Russians. Thus, as Korda so clearly points out: Hitler was born in Austria, as were many of his worst henchmen. It is Hungary that paid the price & suffered for 3 decades for Hitler's crimes. To me this is the biggest irony of the millenia & akin to a Greek tragedy. Michael Korda who was born in Britain but whose father, Vincent Korda was born in Hungary, surmises that Hungary was a reluctant ally for Hitler, or Germany. However, I can attest to this fact. Hungary was indeed a very reluctant ally of Germany in the WW11l. Fearing major reprisals from Germany if they refused to be an ally, they virtually under duress fought with the Germans in WW11. For example, my grandfather, Resser Győrgy (in Hungarian the surname comes first) or in English: George Resser. He was born in Pilisvorosvar, a German speaking town about twenty kilometres from Budapest, which is the capital of Hungary. My grandfather had a German surname. My grandfather's commanding officer, also a Hungarian, expressed his serious resentment & or his anger at being dragged into a war with Germany. This being directed at my grandfather & he said that he could not have a German surname if he was in the Hungarian army. However, my grandfather refused to change his surname. He was subsequently tortured by his own army, till he passed out & his hands were put onto hot plates so as to help him to come to... Eventually, after such torture my grandfather acquiesced & said he chooses a particular Hungarian surname that was of a famous Hungarian. The Hungarian officer refused his request & gave him three Hungarian surnames to select from. My grandfather chose Rimoczi & subsequently from the front, wrote home to my grandmother stating that from now on our surname is Rimoczi. This resulted in the curious fact that my aunty's birth certificate is Resser & my mother's birth certificate is Rimoczi! To add insult to injury, when my grandfather tried to climb onto the trucks that the German soldiers were traveling in so that he would not have to walk during WW11; they kicked his hands so that he wouldn't be able to climb on. This is because he was wearing a Hungarian uniform. Thankfully, he survived & my grandparents visited me in Australia for about 18 months when I was five years old. And I recited a prayer in Hungarian to Cardinal Mindszenty when he visited Australia! Thus, the book has tremendous personal significance for me. Given that my education was in Australia it helps to fill in a lot of the gaps in my understanding of Hungarian history and also modern European history which I did not study in matriculation.

Journey to a Revolution by Michael Korda is a must read for people, like myself, whose parents are Hungarian refugees.
Mori
Yes, there are factual errors . . . once you get past them and remember this more memoir than historical text, its quite enjoyable reading. Did I feel like I was there? No, but I felt like Korda was.
Tuliancel
When even Dr. Kissinger is fascinated by the book about a subject he knows well, I do not have to add my own fascination. The mere cruelty of the Russian military suppressing the Hungarian revolution of 1956 is relived by British students who ventured into the middle of it. By the way the Hungarian Sir Alexander Korda, famous film maker, is his uncle. Michael Korda , though, does not speak Hungarian in the least.
Wenyost
I bought this book for research and wasn't disappointed. Every book written about the Hungarian Revolution of 1956 offers a different perspective: some are more political, some more eye-witness and personal. I was especially affected by the involvement of the young people in that Revolution.
Abywis
A companion book to James Michener's THE BRIDGE AT ANDAU.
Uylo
Michael Korda's book is factual and his observations accurate. This is among the few books that describes the cause and timing of the '56 revolution without bias.
Drelahuginn
Perfect reading for a long airplane flight. Especially good for one with a desire to learn about, or be reminded of, the sad events of 1956; or, for one simply interested in a quick rundown on the history and culture of Hungary. Michael Korda is a gifted writer with a most interesting personal history. He relates this serious tale from his youth in a bemused, understated way.
The story of one of the most tragic events of postwar Europe. Riveting narrative by a witness of these momentous events. An excellent book.