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by William Dalrymple

eBook The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty: Delhi, 1857 download ISBN: 1400078334
Author: William Dalrymple
Publisher: Vintage; 58459th edition (March 11, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 592
ePub: 1761 kb
Fb2: 1663 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: mobi lrf lrf lit
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Historical

This 2006 work continues the amazing metamorphosis of a travel writer into a historian

This 2006 work continues the amazing metamorphosis of a travel writer into a historian. Perhaps this is partly due to the author's passion for the world of which he writes, but it also must be more than that. Greatness is sometimes easy to recognize and yet difficult to describe. The book tells of the last emperor at the time of the Indian rebellion of 1857.

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The Last Mughal book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty: Delhi, 1857 as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

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William Dalrymple is the author of five acclaimed works of history and travel, including City of Djinns, which won the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award and the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award; the best-selling From the Holy Mountain; and White Mughals, which won Britain’s most.

William Dalrymple is the author of five acclaimed works of history and travel, including City of Djinns, which won the Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year Award and the Thomas Cook Travel Book Award; the best-selling From the Holy Mountain; and White Mughals, which won Britain’s most prestigious history prize, the Wolfson.

The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857 is a 2006 historical book by William Dalrymple. He worked on these documents in association with the Urdu scholar Mahmood Farooqui.

William Dalrymple the author of The Last Mughal does a great job in the first two and a good job in the last. 20,000 pieces of letters, chits and documents in the National Archives that were gathering dust were pored over. A Delhi newspaper Dihli Urdu Akhbar that kept publishing all through the four-month rebellion was looked into. Records in various archives including the distant Rangoon archives were studied. All these provided the Indian perspective for this book. Delhi before mutiny was a city that had withstood the march of time

THE LAST MUGHAL THE FALL OF A DYNASTY, DELHI, 1857 WILLIAM DALRYMPLE To my beloved .

A natural-born storyteller, Dalrymple recounts the dramatic history of Mughal Delhi before, during and after the 1857 Indian mutiny with such brio and passion that it is impossible not to be won over’ Sunday Times Books of the Year. Informed throughout with poignant awareness of contemporary events. His final words are a bleak warning, and one can only hope that The Last Mughal finds its way onto the bedtime tables of current world leaders’ Lucy Moore, Daily Mail.

A book about the Great Indian Mutiny of 1857. The first attempt to free itself of foreign rule and war of Independence.

The Last Mughalis an extraordinary revisionist work with clear contemporary echoes. A book about the Great Indian Mutiny of 1857.

William Dalrymple looks at Zafar, the last ruler in the Mughal dynasty. Dalrymple excels at bringing grand historical events within contemporary understanding by documenting the way people went about their lives amid the maelstrom

William Dalrymple looks at Zafar, the last ruler in the Mughal dynasty. Dalrymple excels at bringing grand historical events within contemporary understanding by documenting the way people went about their lives amid the maelstrom. Continue reading the main story.

In this evocative study of the fall of the Mughal Empire and the beginning of the Raj, award-winning historian William Dalrymple uses previously undiscovered sources to investigate a pivotal moment in history.

The last Mughal emperor, Zafar, came to the throne when the political power of the Mughals was already in steep decline. Nonetheless, Zafar—a mystic, poet, and calligrapher of great accomplishment—created a court of unparalleled brilliance, and gave rise to perhaps the greatest literary renaissance in modern Indian history. All the while, the British were progressively taking over the Emperor's power. When, in May 1857, Zafar was declared the leader of an uprising against the British, he was powerless to resist though he strongly suspected that the action was doomed. Four months later, the British took Delhi, the capital, with catastrophic results. With an unsurpassed understanding of British and Indian history, Dalrymple crafts a provocative, revelatory account of one the bloodiest upheavals in history.

Comments: (7)
Matty
For nearly 300 years the Mughals ruled India in addition to what is now Pakistan and Bangladesh but by the 1850s their rule was in a terminal decline. The British East India Company and other colonial forces had eaten away at their power and local governors were virtually independent. The increasingly ambitious British were making plans for remake India in their image and the Mughals were not a part of the plan.

In this book William Dalrymple tells the story of Zafar, the last Mughal Emperor as he finds himself thrust into the largest anti-colonial war of the 19th Century the Indian Mutiny/Uprising of 1857. It's a grim story with atrocities and stupidity on both sites.

This is not a light read. It is probably the definitive account of of the war drawing on British, Indian and Pakistani records, some never translated before. Diaries, letters and other personal accounts provide a vivid first-hand account.

Dalrymple's writing also does not make things easy for the reader, he never says washerman when he can say 'dhobi' , never says police station if he can say 'thana'. He's usually good at defining the Urdu words in context and the Kindle dictionary or his glossary cover most of the rest but the use of Indian terms plus the Victorian terms from many of the accounts make this a bit of a chore to read sometimes.

The publisher also put no effort into creating the ebook. For example photos in the print version are, of necessity, in their own section on special paper. But in an ebook there's no reason they can't be placed among the text where they belong in context. Instead they just suddenly appear as a block in the middle of a chapter interrupting the text. I also find it hard to flip to the maps and glossary on an ebook, I might have enjoyed this more on paper.

Finally I found the conclusion a bit abrupt. Yes, ending 'The Last Mughal' with the death of the last Mughal makes sense, but another chapter covering the transition from the British East India Company to the British Raj would be help finish the story. Instead there's some overly simplified conclusions mourning the loss of the Mughal's cosmopolitan rule and trying to link the uprising to the rise of Al Qaeda and the September 11th attacks 150 years later.

All that being said, this was a great read, an incredible work of scholarship and storytelling and anyone with an interest in India will enjoy it.
Phalaken
This book does a good job of describing Delhi, before and after the 1857 mutiny against the British. I had no idea that the rebellion had such tremendous effect on Delhi. The social fabric of city drastically changed. Bahadur Shah Zafar comes across as an old sympathetic figure, who because of his age and demeanor couldn’t play as big of a role as he could have. The book moves you to feel bad for Delhi—a beautiful cultural city—utterly disfigured during and after the rebellion, by both the mutineers and the British.
Yndanol
Seldom have I read a book so intriguing. For the first time the story of the 1857 Sepoy Rebellion is told from both sides. Dalrymple has consulted the archives in all the languages, not just English, and so one begins to understand the tottering nature of the Mughal dynasty in the decades before 1857 and its end after 1857. The case for labeling the mutton-headedness of the East India Company has rarely been so well documented. As I've remarked about Dalrymple's history of the 1839 - 1842 Afghan wars, I expected to find racial prejudice among the company's officers and army. I hadn't expected it to be so crude, but most of all I never expected the Company to be so incompetent. Dalrymple shows. It's a book that both non-specialists like myself and professional historians will profit from.
Hugifyn
William Dalrymple has the extraordinary ability to take a historical event of great complexity and produce a text that is utterly readable, yet without oversimplifying the issues. He examines the Indian Mutiny from the point of view of both sides. There are no heroes in this story.

A warning, however - buy a hard copy of this book. The Kindle edition is a disgraceful mess of faulty computer scanning. It may seem inexpensive, but it's not worth the money.
komandante
I read this book with much anticipation. Indeed, I learned quite a bit from this book about the atmosphere in the Indian subcontinent around the time of the 1857 mutiny. The author has done a commendable job of painting a highly sympathetic view of Bahadur Shah Zafar (BSZ), the last Mughal emperor of India. Growing up, I recall reading about the exile of BSZ in Burma, and how prominent Indian freedon fighters, including Subhas Bose, regarded BSZ as the symbol of Indian humiliation under English occupation. To think that the progeny of Akbar, one of the most remarkable rulers in the murky history of monarchy, could be so treated and purposefully humiliated (even if his own imperial power was highly diminished), is to have a glimpse into the deeply racist framework of European colonialism. The stories about the petty British army officials getting "busy hanging your cooks", and other forms of ghastly barbarity, simply echo many other instances of the ability of European colonists to calmly and with grim determination, commit the most cruel and inhuman acts of mass murder and war crimes. The extermination of 14 out of 16 of BSZ's children fills me with deep sorrow for the poet and Sufi devotee that the cruelly deposed emperor really was. The history of the non-European world is chock-full of such acts and worse.

Where I am truly disappointed with Mr. Dalrymple's book is his minimization (something the British and their WW2 allies have practised non-stop since August, 1945) of Subhas Bose (India's beloved Netaji), even when the context required, even begged, mention of his name. Thus, he minimally mentions there being an Indian independence army division named after the valiant Rani of Jhansi, Laxmibai. The fact that this division was part of the remarkable Indian National Army (INA), built up almost single-handedly by Subhas Chandra Bose, and, more than exemplifying his astonishing courage and power of leadership, showed him as a visionary leader who valued true ideas of democracy (the ideals of a true, secular state that honored women, minorities, and all faiths)- Mr. Dalrymple chooses to bypass any of this, much the same way that Richard Attenborough did in the film, Gandhi, thirty years ago.