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by Duff Hart-Davis,Sir Alan Lascelles

eBook King's Counsellor Abdication and War: The Diaries of Sir Alan Lascelles download ISBN: 0753822253
Author: Duff Hart-Davis,Sir Alan Lascelles
Publisher: Phoenix (January 1, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 480
ePub: 1186 kb
Fb2: 1144 kb
Rating: 4.8
Other formats: lrf docx rtf doc
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Historical

This was a very good book, and Sir Lascelles's viewpoint of WWII (from 1942-1945) was incredible interesting; I really .

This was a very good book, and Sir Lascelles's viewpoint of WWII (from 1942-1945) was incredible interesting; I really enjoyed the insights about how the invasion of Normandy was planned. The only disappointment I had with this book is the fact he did not write much about the Abdication and none at all about their Majesties trip to . or the begining of WWII. 6 people found this helpful.

Who's Who. ^ Hart-Davis, Duff (2006). King's Counsellor: Abdication and War, the Diaries of Sir Alan Lascelles. Hart-Davis, Duff (2006)

The Right Honourable. Who's Who. Hart-Davis, Duff (2006).

Tommy Lascelles's diaries begin with Edward VIII's abdication and end with George VI's death and .

Tommy Lascelles's diaries begin with Edward VIII's abdication and end with George VI's death and his daughter Elizabeth's Coronation. In between we see George VI at work and play, a portrait more intimate than any other previously published. The early part about Edward VIII is a damning profile; the bulk of the book is WWII as seen from a key courtier - Lascelles is first assistant and soon private secretary to the King and Queen.

Tommy Lascelles' ed diaries paint a vivid picture of the past-from Edward VIII's abdication to. .

Tommy Lascelles' ed diaries paint a vivid picture of the past-from Edward VIII's abdication to George VI's death and his daughter Elizabeth's Coronation. In between lies an enormous range of events, including World War II as seen from Lascelles' point of view as private secretary to the Royal Family, the Princess Margaret-Peter Townsend affair, and the fascinating relationship between Prime Minister Winston Churchill and the King. These detailed journals are a delight to read as well as being invaluable historic record.

Hart-Davis produced two other books from Lascelles' writing prior this one: End of an Era and in Royal .

Hart-Davis produced two other books from Lascelles' writing prior this one: End of an Era and in Royal Service, which cover from his school days in the 1870s to outbreak of the second world war. These two books are now out of print and very hard to get, but are worth hunting ou.Winter draws on, as I have just finished 'King's Counsellor - the diaries of Sir Alan Lascelles', the private secretary to King George VI. Very good, and as with other writers' diaries/letters find many of the last entries very poignant. Also with this fellow, after a life of tact and prudence with his work, he allows himself to become just a bit risqué towards the end.

Kings Counsellor: Abdication and War: The Diaries of Sir Alan Lascelles (e.

Kings Counsellor: Abdication and War: The Diaries of Sir Alan Lascelles (ed. Duff Hart-Davies, Weidenfiend and Nicolson £25). The last volume of Sir Alan Lascelles’s diaries, published in 1989, left him disillusioned with the abdicating Edward VIII, whom he called ‘the most tragic might-have-been in all history’. He ended his days as a bearded recluse in the Old Stables of Kensington Palace.

Sir Alan Lascelles, known to the Establishment as Tommy, was born in the year of Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee and died aged 94 a few days after watching a firework display to mark the wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer. Between those two landmarks he devoted 27 years of his life to royal service as private secretary or assistant private secretary to four successive sovereigns: George V, Edward VIII, George VI and our present Queen.

Lascelles, Alan (2006). Hart-Davis, Duff (e. The Letters and Journals of Sir Alan Lascelles. 1. London: Hamish Hamilton. ISBN 978-0-241-11960-0. King's Counsellor: Abdication and War: The Diaries of Tommy Lascelles. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. ISBN 978-0-297-85155-4. In Royal Service, 1920–1936. 2. ISBN 978-0-241-12562-5.

Sir Alan Frederick "Tommy" Lascelles GCB GCVO CMG MC (11 April 1887 - 10 August 1981) was a British courtier and . King's Counsellor: Abdication and War: the Diaries of Tommy Lascelles" (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, London.

Lascelles (usually pronounced to rhyme with "tassels") was known to his intimates as "Tommy.

Tommy Lascelles's diaries begin with Edward VIII's abdication and end with George VI's death and his daughter Elizabeth's Coronation. In between we see George VI at work and play, a portrait more intimate than any other previously published. The early part about Edward VIII is a damning profile; the bulk of the book is World War II as seen from a key courtier—Lascelles is first assistant and soon private secretary to the King and Queen. In the post-war discussions, topics include Queen Mary's concern over the marriage of her grandson George Harewood (Lascelles' 2nd cousin) and Princess Margaret's relationship with the equerry, Peter Townsend. There is one additional element: Winston Churchill. Lascelles shows the Prime Minister and the King and how they worked together and how Churchill didn't always get his way. Lascelles was a fine writer and his diaries are a delight to read as well as being invaluable history.

Comments: (7)
Thiama
I read the diary immediately after reading the third volume of the William Manchester/Reid biography of Churchill. What a terrific pair of books. Lascelles diary gives an intimate picture of what was going on at the time from the point of view of a Palace insider. He is both discreet and revealing at the same time, and brings to life an angle on the war that is different from most accounts. I thought King's Counsellor was so good, it was exciting to think about reading some more of it each night. Some interesting remarks, too, about the disreputable doings of the Duke of Windsor, someone Lascelles had known for a long time.

I liked this diary so much, I tracked down the earlier diary covering the Twenties and Thirties, leading up to '36.
Bumand
Interesting, entertaining, historic. Tommy Lascelles' diaries written during WW2 bring to life the politicians, Royalty and the ordinary people at a time of enormous difficulty. He comments one day about a terrible event and the next day comments about the beauty of the Wisteria in the garden. This secondhand book arrived promptly and in splendid condition.
Rleillin
An excellent, academic work. If this time period/subject is your interest, it is a must read.
Kale
If you are interested in anything related to the period of England from 1929-1950, this is going to be of interest. Even if you are not, it is worth a read just for the excellence of the writing.
Onetarieva
This was a very good book, and Sir Lascelles's viewpoint of WWII (from 1942-1945) was incredible interesting; I really enjoyed the insights about how the invasion of Normandy was planned.

The only disappointment I had with this book is the fact he did not write much about the Abdication and none at all about their Majesties trip to U.S. or the begining of WWII.
Anararius
When Diana and Sarah Duchess of York spoke of the "grey men" of the royal household, they spoke of men like Lascelles. From the promo material for the book, I expected a little more spice, especially regarding his disdain for Edward VIII. This period - the abdication year - by far more potentially interesting than the dark years of the war (except for those obsessed with the "greatest generation") is only touched upon briefly. I can't belive he didn't have more to say. Well, anyway, as a first hand source of life at the palace it certainly provides some insight. If you are looking for something really new... this isn't it.
Gajurus
Tommy Lascelles saw it all, but was raised in the grand tradition of the English Gentleman so censored himself way to often in writing his diary. So much has, therefore, been lost. Still, I highly recommend it for the "feel" it gives to a now gone era.
Remarkable!
Extremely well written.
Delivers an other "point of view" of those tense times times of the English History.