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by Louis MacNeice

eBook The Strings Are False: An Unfinished Autobiography download ISBN: 0571239420
Author: Louis MacNeice
Publisher: Faber & Faber; Main edition (September 1, 2007)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1966 kb
Fb2: 1115 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf lit azw lrf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Ethnic and National

MacNeice's unfinished autobiography not only sheds light on a lost age of British social history, which includes the . I began reading "The Strings are False" because Louis MacNeice was a schoolmate at Marlborough of the Cambridge Spy and Art Historian Anthony Blunt.

MacNeice's unfinished autobiography not only sheds light on a lost age of British social history, which includes the turbulent thirties and the Spanish civil war, but it also gives one a glimpse into the life of a beautiful mind of an era that is gone forever. I was delighted to discover the luminescent prose of one of the outstanding British poets of the twentieth century.

The Strings are False book. MacNeice's evaluation of himself at Marlborough, An autobiography written in the 1940s but set aside, and published for the first time after MacNeice's death in 1965

The Strings are False book. MacNeice's evaluation of himself at Marlborough, An autobiography written in the 1940s but set aside, and published for the first time after MacNeice's death in 1965. In this book he talks about himself freely, most intelligently, incisively, and without self-pity.

MacNeice’s poetic vision has long been recognised as double-edged, his creativity sourced in a displacement that was ‘pre-natal’

MacNeice’s poetic vision has long been recognised as double-edged, his creativity sourced in a displacement that was ‘pre-natal’. 1 Born in Belfast and raised in Carrickfergus, where his father, a Church of Ireland bishop, ministered, MacNeice’s unhappy childhood led him to mythologise the west of Ireland, where his parents came from, as his ‘true’ home. Yet he was never more than a visitor in the west, despite his rapturous response to the Connacht landscape. Nor did he ever seriously contemplate settling there

Frederick Louis MacNeice CBE (12 September 1907 – 3 September 1963) was an Irish poet and playwright from Northern Ireland, and a member . Louis MacNeice, The Strings are False (autobiography), Faber and Faber, 1965.

Frederick Louis MacNeice CBE (12 September 1907 – 3 September 1963) was an Irish poet and playwright from Northern Ireland, and a member of the Auden Group, which also included W. H. Auden, Stephen Spender and Cecil Day-Lewis. MacNeice's body of work was widely appreciated by the public during his lifetime, due in part to his relaxed but socially and emotionally aware style. Jon Stallworthy Louis MacNeice Faber and Faber, 1995.

MacNeice, Louis, 1907-1963; Dodds, E. R. (Eric Robertson), 1893- ed. Books for People with Print Disabilities. (Eric Robertson), 1893- edt. Publication date. Internet Archive Books.

As Louis MacNeice lay dying in 1963, his last major work, a radio play called Persons from Porlock, was broadcast by the BBC. It is about a painter called Hank, who starts well in the 1930s, but whose development, as MacNeice explains in a note, ‘is interrupted by the war. Subsequent interruptions and frustrations include those occasioned by the lure of commercial art, by drink, money troubles and women. Hence the title of the play

Author(s): Louis MacNeice. Title: The Strings are False: An Unfinished Autobiography. Louis MacNeice was born in Belfast in 1907.

Author(s): Louis MacNeice. Read full description. His first book of poems, Blind Fireworks, appeared in 1929, and he subsequently worked as a translator, literary critic, playwright, BBC producer and autobiographer. The Burning Perch, his last volume of poems, appeared shortly before his death in 1963. Country of Publication. Biographies & Autobiographies.

Louis MacNeice facts: The British poet Louis MacNeice (1907-1964) claimed himself to be not a theorist but a poetic .

Louis MacNeice facts: The British poet Louis MacNeice (1907-1964) claimed himself to be not a theorist but a poetic empiricist. His unfinished autobiography was post-humously published as The Strings Are False The best source of information about his life is his The Strings Are False: An Unfinished Autobiography, published by Oxford University Press in 1966 under MacNeice's pseudonym, Louis Malone. His Collected Poems was published the following year. Additional Biography Sources. Coulton, Barbara, Louis MacNeice in the BBC, London; Boston: Faber and Faber, 1980.

Home MacNeice, Louis The Strings Are False: An Unfinished Autobiography. Contact Bibliodisia Books owner and authorized representative Carlos Martinez by mail at 4400 South Spaulding Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60632, . The Strings Are False: An Unfinished Autobiography. Published by Oxford University Pres, New York, 1966. Condition: Fine Hardcover. or by e- mail at [email protected] com or telephone 773-577-3806 (texting only, in . if you have any problems or complaints.

The Strings are False. The Strings are False is Louis MacNeice's unfinished autobiography. Written when MacNeice was a young man it was only discovered and published after his death in 1963

The Strings are False. Written when MacNeice was a young man it was only discovered and published after his death in 1963. Described by Geoffrey Grigson in the Guardian as 'the best thing Louis MacNeice ever wrote in prose' The Strings are False is being reissued in MacNeice's centenary year with a new preface by Derek Mahon.

"The Strings are False" is Louis MacNeice's unfinished autobiography. Written when MacNeice was a young man it was only discovered and published after his death in 1963. Described by Geoffrey Grigson in the "Guardian" as 'the best thing Louis MacNeice ever wrote in prose', "The Strings are False" is being reissued in MacNeice's centenary year with a new preface by Derek Mahon.
Comments: (4)
Mr.Death
Even on the very first pages of this "unfinished autobiography" there is a hint of snobbery, but that MacNeice is aware of the snobbery he was trained to feel as a member of the middle class is one of the strengths of the book. MacNeice, a poet and friend of W.H. Auden and Stephen Spender wrote this account of his life in 1940 at the age of 33; he never got it published during his lifetime. Maybe he felt the book was too honest - which the modern reader will certainly regard as its chief virtue. MacNeice is far from being a holy man or from being a glamorous bonvivant, and he never tries to give the impression of being what he his not.
MacNeices biography is quite exemplary. He was born in Belfast as the son of an Anglican clergyman with "Home Rule" - sympathies, yet at the age of seven he was sent to a private school in England and never came back to Ireland except on holiday. He felt torn between his Irish and British identities for the rest of his life. At the same time there was the identity of the public school boy, who when at Oxford despised the serious petty bourgeois students from grammar schools, and who when teaching at Birmingham University never took his students very seriously, just because they were not middle class.
MacNeice is a lot more aloof than Auden or Spender, he never really falls for the temptation of communism, nor was he bound to be charmed by Catholicism. He tells quite vividly how he got his full share of religion while growing up in a rector's house. Northern Ireland, Oxford, Birmingham, London, Spain, France, the USA are the places where he explores different kinds of conflicts. Combined with his absolute honesty this makes MacNeice the ideal companion to show us what life was like in the 1920s and 1930s in Britain. He hardly ever mentions his poetry, so this is not just a book for poetry lovers. MacNeice's scepticism has been compared to Orwell's, but in contrast to Orwell he does not affect to be an outsider. He admits that life could be quite comfortable at the time. Just like Orwell, however, MacNeice did not fail to read the writing on the wall.
Antuiserum
I began reading "The Strings are False" because Louis MacNeice was a schoolmate at Marlborough of the Cambridge Spy and Art Historian Anthony Blunt. I was delighted to discover the luminescent prose of one of the outstanding British poets of the twentieth century. Like Blunt, MacNeice was the son of an Anglican clergyman, and like Blunt, he kicked over the traces of his religious upbringing. Unlike Blunt, however, MacNeice's revolution found expression in his poetry instead of an effort to overthrow the hierarchical British class system.

Why should one bother to read this book, which has long passed out of current circulation? MacNeice's unfinished autobiography not only sheds light on a lost age of British social history, which includes the turbulent thirties and the Spanish civil war, but it also gives one a glimpse into the life of a beautiful mind of an era that is gone forever. Moreover, "The Strings are False" leads us to the gateway to MacNeice's poetry, such as "Epilogue," which furnishes a clue to the title of his book:

Rows of books around me stand,

Fence me in on either hand;

Through that forest of dead words

I would hunt the living birds -

So I write these lines for you

Who have felt the death-wish too,

All the wires are cut, my friends

Live beyond the severed ends.
Swift Summer
I began reading "The Strings are False" because Louis MacNeice was a schoolmate at Marlborough of the Cambridge Spy and Art Historian Anthony Blunt. I was delighted to discover the luminescent prose of one of the outstanding British poets of the twentieth century. Like Blunt, MacNeice was the son of an Anglican clergyman, and like Blunt, he kicked over the traces of his religious upbringing. Unlike Blunt, however, MacNeice's revolution found expression in his poetry instead of an effort to overthrow the hierarchical British class system.

Why should one bother to read this book, which has long passed out of current circulation? MacNeice's unfinished autobiography not only sheds light on a lost age of British social history, which includes the turbulent thirties and the Spanish civil war, but it also gives one a glimpse into the life of a beautiful mind of an era that is gone forever. Moreover, "The Strings are False" leads us to the gateway to MacNeice's poetry, such as "Epilogue," which furnishes a clue to the title of his book:

Rows of books around me stand,
Fence me in on either hand;
Through that forest of dead words
I would hunt the living birds -
So I write these lines for you
Who have felt the death-wish too,
All the wires are cut, my friends
Live beyond the severed ends.