carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Charles Dickens: A Life

eBook Charles Dickens: A Life download

by Claire Tomalin

eBook Charles Dickens: A Life download ISBN: 0143122053
Author: Claire Tomalin
Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (October 30, 2012)
Language: English
Pages: 576
ePub: 1663 kb
Fb2: 1336 kb
Rating: 4.9
Other formats: azw lrf mbr doc
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Arts and Literature

To encompass this frenzy, Tomalin keeps the story racing.

CLAIRE TOMALIN Charles Dickens A Life VIKING an imprint of PINGUIN BOOKS Contents List of Illustrations .

CLAIRE TOMALIN Charles Dickens A Life VIKING an imprint of PINGUIN BOOKS Contents List of Illustrations Maps Keys to Maps Cast List Prologue: Th.

Tomalin's book, a page-turner, seems to me to be an effective reproof to those who, like Michael Holroyd, believe literary . Claire Tomalin will be discussing Charles Dickens: A Life at the Southbank Centre on 18 October, southbankcentre.

Tomalin's book, a page-turner, seems to me to be an effective reproof to those who, like Michael Holroyd, believe literary biography to be in its death throes.

Claire Tomalin, author of Whitbread Book of the Year Samuel Pepys, paints an unforgettable portrait of Dickens, capturing brilliantly the complex character of this great genius. Charles Dickens: A Life is the examination of Dickens we deserve. This is a well-recorded biography that needs to go down in history as the great novelist himself. However, I will not call Dickens the greatest novelist of England by any means as the book's introduction says. His life has been narrated in a subtle manner and this gives the readers comprehensive information about Dickens' development as a person and also as an author.

Charles Dickens is the acclaimed definitive biography by bestselling author Claire Tomalin Charles Dickens was a. .

Charles Dickens is the acclaimed definitive biography by bestselling author Claire Tomalin Charles Dickens was a phenomenon: a demonicly hardworking journalist, the father of ten children, a tireless walker and traveller, a supporter of liberal social causes, but most of all a great novelist - the creator of characters who live immortally in the English imagination: the Artful Dodger, Mr Pickwick, Pip, David Copperfield, Little Nell, Lady Dedlock, and many more. At the age of twelve he was sent to work in a blacking factory by his affectionate but feckless parents

Claire Tomalin (born Claire Delavenay on 20 June 1933) is an English author and journalist, known for her biographies on Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Samuel Pepys, Jane Austen, and Mary Wollstonecraft

Claire Tomalin (born Claire Delavenay on 20 June 1933) is an English author and journalist, known for her biographies on Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Samuel Pepys, Jane Austen, and Mary Wollstonecraft. Tomalin was born Claire Delavenay on 20 June 1933 in London, the daughter of English composer Muriel Herbert and French academic Émile Delavenay.

Charles Dickens is well-received in America. Claire Tomalin's acclaimed biography. As part of Dickens on the BBC Radio 4 broadcasts extracts from Claire Tomalin's acclaimed new biography of the novelist who called himself the "inimitable". He was the writer so "charged with imaginative energy that he rendered nineteenth century England crackling, full of truth and life, with his laughter, horror and indignation - and sentimentality. Read by Penelope Wilton Abridged by Richard Hamilton Produced by Elizabeth Allard.

Xlvii, 527 . p. of plates : 24 cm. When Charles Dickens died in 1870, The Times of London successfully campaigned for his burial in Westminster Abbey, the final resting place of England's kings and heroes. Thousands flocked to mourn the best recognized and loved man of nineteenth-century England. His books had made them laugh, shown them the squalor and greed of English life, and also the power of personal virtue and the strength of ordinary people. In his last years Dickens drew adoring crowds, had met presidents and princes, and had amassed a fortune. Yet like his heroes, Dickens trod a hard path to greatness.

From Claire Tomalin, bestselling author of Samuel Pepys, comes Charles Dickens, the definitive biography of our greatest novelist who brought us Great Expectations, Oliver Twist, A Christmas Carol, A Tale of Two Cities and Nicholas Nickleby - for fa.

From Claire Tomalin, bestselling author of Samuel Pepys, comes Charles Dickens, the definitive biography of our greatest novelist who brought us Great Expectations, Oliver Twist, A Christmas Carol, A Tale of Two Cities and Nicholas Nickleby - for fans of Peter Ackroyd Charles Dickens was a phenomenon: a demonicly hardworking journalist, the father of ten children, a tireless walker and traveller, a supporter of liberal social causes, but most of all a great novelist - the creator of characters who live immortally in the English imagination: the Artful Dodger, Mr Pickwick, Pip, David Copperfiel.

Award-winning Claire Tomalin, author of A Life of My Own, sets the standard for sophisticated and popular biography, having written lives of Jane Austen, Samuel Pepys, and Thomas Hardy, among others. Here she tackles the best recognized and loved man of nineteenth-century England, Charles Dickens; a literary leviathan whose own difficult path to greatness inspired the creation of classic novels such as Great Expectations, David Copperfield, Oliver Twist, and Hard Times. From his sensational public appearances to the obsessive love affair that led him to betray, deceive, and break with those closest to him, Charles Dickens: A Life is a triumph of the biographer’s craft, a comedy that turns to tragedy in a story worthy of Dickens’ own pen.
Comments: (7)
Yalone
This book has surely been a tour-de-force by the author in reconstructing the life of Charles Dickens. In fact the man behind the most celebrated novels of the Victorian age (and of all times) was what we would call today a hyper-active dude, both in personal life and in public and literary life. Always restless, and probably harbouring a tangle of un-resolved conflicts with his family of origin, Dickens spent his life in so many activities that it is difficult to understand how he found time for everything: novelist, journalist, editor, dramaturgist, more-than-amateur actor, social and political activist, philantropist, socialite and more, having a family menagerie with a score of children, living and possessing several houses in England and abroad, travelling throughout Europe and America. Actually I cannot imagine how the biographer could reconstruct all those details from the available documentation. The book is above all a description on how in Dickens personal life and literature are so inestricably entangled that it is difficult to understand what came first: private experiences or literary fantasy. For those who love Dickens and his works this is a book not to miss.
Naa
Charles Dickens wrote so much and lived his life on such a scale that his most complete and definitive biographies (such as Peter Ackroyd's exuberant 1990 life study of the author) assume Dickensian proportions themselves. While this dynamic can be vastly entertaining, it can also make many of them quite intimidating for readers trying to find a simpler outline of the great novelist's life; Jane Smiley's brief 2003 biography for the Penguin Lives series sought to fill such a gap, but was judged inadequate and too chatty by many of its reviewers. Claire Tomalin, one of the best contemporary British biographers, has produced this book which is enormously readable and quite manageable in size, consisting of only about 400 pages of text narrative. This work should be seen by no means as any kind of standard or definitive biography (it is too brief for that), but is probably a much better introduction to Dickens's life for the common reader than Edgar Johnson's famous work from more than a half a century ago or Ackroyd's 1990 work (no matter how much fun Ackroyd's can be if you have the time and can find an old copy of it). It is also less invested, as other reviewers have noted, in providing full-scale readings of Dickens's novels and major novellas or short stories, though it does outline and evaluate them intelligently and provide crucial links between them and Dickens' life.

Tomalin produced an account of Dickens' affair late in life with the actress Ellen Ternan, THE INVISIBLE WOMAN, many years ago, so is clearly well read in the relevant source materials from Dickens and his circle. Although she is quite clear in her belief that Dickens did consummate his affair with Ternan (which some other Dickens' biographers have disputed), she is to some extent more generous to Dickens himself than other biographers have been, who have produced a portrait of him late in his life (particularly after his break with his wife Catherine) as being obsessively paranoid, self-righteous and manic nearly to the degree of insanity. (This depiction has found perhaps its consummation in Dan Simmons' overwrought and exhausting gothic horror fantasy about Dickens' later years, DROOD.) But although Tomalin does not deny Dickens' cruelty towards his wife and his narcissism, and of the many missteps he takes with his friends and family and even his critical pieces in his journals, there's a strong sense throughout this biography of how much she strongly admires him, right to the end of his life. The book is marvelously readable and comes with some rarely seen (and helpfully annotated) images of Dickens and his family and his circle, as well as terrific illustrated maps of his and his family's homes in Rochester, central London and North London. I would recommend this highly to anyone who is first reading Dickens' novels and wants to get a full (if not fully scholarly) outline of his life and achievements.
Trex
In the run-up to Dickens' 200th birthday this year, there have been a number of biographies of the writer published. As a big fan of Dickens, I have read a number of them and most of them are quite good. I've yet to come across one I'd describe as the "best" or "definitive" as they all seem to have their strengths and weaknesses. Tomalin's biography is no different. In some ways it is very good but it also has its irritations.

Let's start with the strengths. This is one of the most readable of the recent biographies of Dickens. It is of manageable length, though it covers his entire life, and the prose pops along very energetically. Mainly this is because she controls the fount of detail. Unlike many biographers, she doesn't overwhelm us. She gives us enough to get a good outline of his story.

The weakness of this biography comes from her fairly obvious desire to take The Inimitable down a few pegs. Her analysis of every novel contains sentences that make me wonder whether she even likes his work. And, of course, there is her desire to beat up Dickens over his treatment of his wife and bring to the fore his mistress, Nelly Ternan. (In fact, she's already written an entire book on Ternan, The Invisible Woman.)

In and of itself, this is not a problem. I am not a fan of worshipful biographies because every human is flawed. For example, no one would argue, I think, that Dickens treated his wife horribly. It is the way Tomalin makes her points that is the problem. In particular, she is a master of saying "there is no proof" of something and then subtly taking that thing for granted as fact later in her book. She does this often but one instance should suffice here: on p. 327 she writes, "There is no proof that it was Nelly who took Dickens to France the summer of 1862, or that the reason for her being in France was the she was pregnant..." and then follows on p. 405 with, "They [Nelly and her husband, George Robinson] had two children, Geoffrey, born in 1879, the adored son who filled the place of the son she had lost, and a daughter, Gladys, in 1884." (My italics.)

Still, if you can take some of Tomalin's "facts" with a grain of salt, this is a pretty good biography. It takes you through Dickens' story briskly and informatively, which is not a quality of all the biographies out there.