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eBook The Loveliest Woman in America: A Tragic Actress, Her Lost Diaries, and Her Granddaughter's Search for Home download

by Bibi Gaston

eBook The Loveliest Woman in America: A Tragic Actress, Her Lost Diaries, and Her Granddaughter's Search for Home download ISBN: 0060857706
Author: Bibi Gaston
Publisher: William Morrow; 1st Edition edition (June 10, 2008)
Language: English
Pages: 352
ePub: 1490 kb
Fb2: 1317 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: doc lrf lrf mobi
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Arts and Literature

Her name was Rosamond Pinchot: hailed as The Loveliest Woman in America, she was a niece .

Her name was Rosamond Pinchot: hailed as The Loveliest Woman in America, she was a niece of Pennsylvania governor Gifford Pinchot; cousin to Edie Sedgwick; half sister of Mary Pinchot Meyer. The discovery of her grandmother’s diaries has taken Gaston on a journey not only of family and home but also of celebrity, politics, death, betrayal, and, eventually, understanding and hope.

Nearly seventy years after her demise, her granddaughter Bibi received a box of more than 1,500 pages of Rosa In 1927, at the age of twenty-three, Rosamond Pinchot was hailed as "The Loveliest Woman in America

Nearly seventy years after her demise, her granddaughter Bibi received a box of more than 1,500 pages of Rosa In 1927, at the age of twenty-three, Rosamond Pinchot was hailed as "The Loveliest Woman in America. At thirty-three, in a sudden, shocking, and highly public act, Rosamond took her own life, setting in motion generations of confusion in the family she left behind

Her name was Rosamond Pinchot: hailed as "The Loveliest Woman in America," she was a niece of. .

Her name was Rosamond Pinchot: hailed as "The Loveliest Woman in America," she was a niece of Pennsylvania governor Gifford Pinchot; cousin to Edie Sedgwick; half sister of Mary Pinchot Meyer, JFK's lover; friend to Eleanor Roosevelt and Elizabeth Arden. At nineteen she was discovered aboard a cruise ship, at twenty-three she married the playboy scion of a political Boston family, but by thirty-three she was dead by her own hand

Nearly seventy years after her demise, her granddaughter Bibi received a box of more than 1,500 pages of In 1927, at the age of twenty-three, Rosamond Pinchot was hailed as "The Loveliest Woman in America

Nearly seventy years after her demise, her granddaughter Bibi received a box of more than 1,500 pages of In 1927, at the age of twenty-three, Rosamond Pinchot was hailed as "The Loveliest Woman in America. At thirty-three, in a sudden, shocking, and highly public act, Rosamond took her own life, setting in motion generations of confusion in the family she left behind.

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Top. American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library. Pinchot, Rosamond, 1904-1938, Gaston, Bibi, Actors. New York, NY : William Morrow. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

A Tragic Actress, Her Lost Diaries, and Her Granddaughter’s. For seventy years, her diaries and scrapbooks languished in airplane hangars, flooding basements, and dusty closets. They disappeared into the dark corners of a family’s pain. For Rosamond and Little Billy. Retrieved from darkness, the diaries changed my life forever. Through them, I learned a good part of Rosamond’s story and found a home in the words of my grandmother. Like a bird sighted in the forest that everyone thought was extinct, Rosamond’s scrapbooks and diaries just showed up. When I started digging around, her obituary also showed up.

Her name was Rosamond Pinchot: hailed as "The Loveliest Woman in America," she was a. At nineteen she was discovered aboard a cruise ship, at twenty-three she married the playboy scion of a political Boston family, but by thirty-three she was dead by her own hand. Unearthing what appeared to be a glamorous fairy-tale existence, Bibi Gaston discovers the roots of the ties that bind and break a family, and uncovers the legacy of two great American dynasties torn apart by her grandmother's untimely death.

Unearthing what appeared to be a glamorous fairy-tale existence, Bibi Gaston discovers the roots of the ties that bind and break a family, and uncovers the legacy of two great American dynasties torn apart by her grandmother's untimely death. This is a tale of three lives and five generations, mothers and grandmothers, longing, holding on and letting go, men, beauty, diets, and letting beauty slip.

Nearly seventy years after her demise, her granddaughter Bibi received a box of more than 1,500 pages of Rosamond's diaries .

Nearly seventy years after her demise, her granddaughter Bibi received a box of more than 1,500 pages of Rosamond's diaries and embarked on a seven-year journey to make sense of the silence that surrounded Rosamond's death and to discover the grandmother she never knew. Bibi also discovered the tragic legacy of the women in her family, including Rosamond's cousin Edie Sedgwick and her half sister, Mary Pinchot Meyer, whose murder in 1964 has never been solved.

Rosamond Pinchot was dubbed "the loveliest woman in America" at 23, yet 10 years later .

Rosamond Pinchot was dubbed "the loveliest woman in America" at 23, yet 10 years later she was dead by her own hand. An acclaimed actress, socialite and sportswoman, she was the toast of Broadway and Hollywood during the 1920s and 1930s.

In 1927, at the age of twenty-three, Rosamond Pinchot was hailed as "The Loveliest Woman in America." At thirty-three, in a sudden, shocking, and highly public act, Rosamond took her own life, setting in motion generations of confusion in the family she left behind.

Nearly seventy years after her demise, her granddaughter Bibi received a box of more than 1,500 pages of Rosamond's diaries and embarked on a seven-year journey to make sense of the silence that surrounded Rosamond's death and to discover the grandmother she never knew. An acclaimed beauty, actress, socialite, and outdoorswoman, Rosamond became the key to Bibi's understanding of her enigmatic and adventurous father, her glamorous but painfully divided family, and herself.

Through the silent labyrinth of a brilliant but troubled family, Bibi pieced together Rosamond's life story—her magical embrace of nature, her love for two compelling but difficult men, and her circle of "on tops," intimates, and mentors, including Elizabeth Arden, Eleanor Roosevelt, George Cukor, and David O. Selznick. Bibi also discovered the tragic legacy of the women in her family, including Rosamond's cousin Edie Sedgwick and her half sister, Mary Pinchot Meyer, whose murder in 1964 has never been solved.

As if looking in a mirror, Bibi found parts of herself in the complex, tragic, yet beautiful story of the high-spirited Rosamond Pinchot and designed a mission at midlife: to outlive the often difficult, but exuberant and passionate, lives of her ancestors.

Comments: (7)
Anasius
Considering the author's extensive setting up of the mouth watering revelation about the discovery of her ill-fated Grandmother Rosamond Pinchot's personal diaries ("a thousand pages") and scrapbooks, I have to say I was disappointed that so little of it all was quoted or incorporated into the book design. Granted, Rosamond Pinchot's name is not known today and this book was more about the effects of her suicide on subsequent generations as well as the ripple effect of absentee fathers that began with her husband "Big" Bill Gaston. So perhaps pages and pages of pictures of Rosamond or her diary would have thrown the book out of key, for it is only a biography of her so much as how her life shaped the author's life (much like John Sedgwick's book "In My Blood" traced the lineage of the Sedgwick tree, which connects where Rosamond's mother Gertrude was the ill-fated Edie Sedgwick's grandmother's sister. Apparently, it was always a family worry that Edie would "turn out like cousin Rosamond", and alas, she did!)

Still, the book is called "The Loveliest Woman in America" and indeed it is Rosamond's beauty that "sells" the book and creates its primary interest, so it would be nice to at least have had more pictures of her, if not more of her diaries too. In fact, I wonder if it wouldn't have been more interesting if she had just published the diary instead of this book. None the less, it is well written and interesting, and certainly better than nothing after the bewitching portrait of Rosamond in Jean Stein's "Edie" sparked an interest in the heretofore long-forgotten actress.
Trash
Thoroughly enjoyed this very well-written book by Bibi Gaston. Knew very little about Rosamond Pinchot, even though I had heard of her. She married into the Gaston family, which is in my family tree. Liked the genealogical details provided and the stories and insights into the individuals--something that is very hard for a genealogist to find--all laid out in one book. A bonus was learning of the family's interest in conservation and the work they have done to further it themselves. Thanks Bibi for putting your efforts into this very informative book.
Nicearad
I got it, and I know the author. I haven't started the read yet, but there has been a lot of family drama and intrigue that sadly has still not ended.
Meztisho
I wish - in fact, I've always wished - that I could write like Patricia "Bibi" Gaston. Especially about family.

Landscape architect Patricia "Bibi" Gaston digs far beyond a mere biography or memoir in The Loveliest Woman, a work of thoughtful and thought-provoking human history.

Yet, like most lives seen from a distance and with the need to rely on third parties for information, crucial questions remain un-answered in this combination of personal discovery and homage to Rosamond Pinchot Gaston - the writer's grandmother, and the woman upon whom the title was bestowed.

But the granddaughter's dogged and steadfast digging to get to the roots of the weeds that threatened to choke off the passions and humanity of the Pinchots - wealth, priviledge, nobless-oblige and a true sense of duty to beauty if not the soil itself - flows and undulates like the hills of Pennsylvania, through the Columbia Gorge on the other side of the country to Morocco and great gulfs of water inbetween.

In revealing her grandmother's weaknesses, she reveals her own personal strengths that came, like most hearty plants, through difficult times and conditions. A little bit of sunshine goes a long way for Pinchots, apparently. Would that there had been more of it shining upon her grandmother than shadowed by her extremely bad taste in men - particularly, the "bad boy" she couldn't keep from marrying, because he was exciting and rebelious, who brought the dark clouds of the Gastons into the family mix.

A great unanswered question remains: why did her grandmother kill herself? Sadness? Depression? The effects of drugs? Another failed or at least doomed relationship?

There are in many, perhaps most, families secrets - people whom you'd rather not mention let alone have your friends or lovers meet, from alcoholics to schizophrenics to terminally ill relatives to just eccentrics.

In many ways, then, Bibi Gaston - through writing reminiscent of Tolstoy -sheds sunshine on the darkest corners of her family's history.

The writer herself raises the unavoidable speculation that even her father, Rosamond's son, may not have been the mere rootless tinkerer he appeared, but rather that other profession that finds such vague descriptions of occupation the best "cover." Some of that speculation may come from the fact Rosamond's half-sister, Mary Pinchot, was married to an early Company man and, after an alleged affair with JFK, wound up dead on the tow path near her home.

Politics, passion and beauty run through this book like the Snake River, fabled for its twists and turns in which lie deep pools that are home to some of the most intelligent trout.

I myself speculate that Rosamond may have been the character Rosemary in F. Scott Fitzgerald's "Tender Is The Night," a companion of sorts not only because it deals with the same time period but with some similar subjects - breaking free of norms in the 1920s and 1930s, women especially experimenting with new hard-won freedoms, including the vote, and yet having some of the same problems as people today, such as infidelity and how couples survive it or don't, whether it's inherent in our species or just a lack of self control and inability to see past momentary gratification of desire to the damage it causes succeeding generations.

Regardless, The Loveliest Woman is worth reading. While Rosamond is gone, her spirit lives on - and while we can't discover any more about Rosamond than her granddaughter was able to put together through dogged interviews and intrepid scouring of family and even national history archives, thanks to Rosamond, and perhaps even her eldest son, Billy Jr., and the woman who fell in love with Billy Jr. just as Rosamond fell for Big Bill, we have had the extreme pleasure of discovering Bibi.
Centrizius
"The Loveliest Woman in America" is perhaps the best book I've read in a decade. It is beautifully written and tells the generational story of two notable families. All the familial history is pulled together by the ostensible subject's granddaughter, with the starting point being her beautiful actress grandmother's suicide before she reached the age of 40. The author's search for family information reveals great sadness, missed opportunities, lost love, famous friends, accomplished family members, and emotional double-crosses that break one's heart. A big player in this book, oddly enough, is the land and remembered places ... forests, waterfalls, pools, paths, and islands in Maine. This book and the people in it will stay with you for a long time. I think Bibi Gaston
is a gifted storyteller and a brave heart.
kewdiepie
A most interesting journey. The research required to have written this book is remarkable and second to none. I felt very connected to this story of Ms. Gaston's. A love story, tragedy, and one person's search for the truth. Very well written and difficult to put down. I highly recommend it!