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eBook Acid Christ: Ken Kesey, LSD and the Politics of Ecstasy download

by Mark Christensen

eBook Acid Christ: Ken Kesey, LSD and the Politics of Ecstasy download ISBN: 1936182009
Author: Mark Christensen
Publisher: Schaffner Press, Inc.; First Edition edition (October 1, 2010)
Language: English
Pages: 440
ePub: 1655 kb
Fb2: 1394 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: mbr txt doc rtf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Arts and Literature

Mark Christensen with Acid Christ has brought Ken Kesey to vibrant life-provocative, colorful, engaging and .

Mark Christensen with Acid Christ has brought Ken Kesey to vibrant life-provocative, colorful, engaging and personal. a front-row seat into the mind of a counter-culture icon. For example, Christensen tells us early in the book that Kesey and his wife Faye's marriage was an open one, and that the both of them were pioneers in this lifestyle, but the subject of Kesey's other lovers is not mentioned again, and there is almost nothing about Faye Kesey at all in the book, not a hint at her participation.

Mark Christensen with Acid Christ has brought Ken Kesey to vibrant life-provocative, colorful, engaging and . Nicholas Schou, author, Orange Sunshine.

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Following the leader of the notorious Merry Pranksters from his birth. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Acid Christ: Ken Kesey, LSD, and the Politics of Ecstasy as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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San Francisco Chronicle: Out Loud, "Mark Christensen with Acid Christ has brought Ken Kesey to vibrant . The writing is fast and full of Joycean play. The figure, THE ACID HEAD. A run along the golden brick road with a Great Pacific Northwest Giant, in more ways than one could imagine.

San Francisco Chronicle: Out Loud, "Mark Christensen with Acid Christ has brought Ken Kesey to vibrant life-provocative, colorful, engaging and personal. -Chuck Palahniuk, bestselling author,Fight Cluband Tell All, "Everybody is down on the 1960s except those of us who went up in smoke when they happened. The cultural cops will never forgive us. Mark Christensen takes you there, the good, bad, and ugly.

Kesey was born in La Junta, Colorado, and grew up in Springfield, Oregon, graduating from the University of Oregon in 1957. Christensen, Mark (2010). Acid Christ : Ken Kesey, LSD, and the politics of ecstasy. Tucson, AZ: Schaffner Press. p. 40. ISBN 9781936182107. He began writing One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in 1960 following the completion of a graduate fellowship in creative writing at Stanford University; the novel was an immediate commercial and critical success when published two years later  .

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Excerpted from 'Chapter 1: Requiem for a Heavyweight" of Acid Christ: Ken Kesey, LSD, and the .

Excerpted from 'Chapter 1: Requiem for a Heavyweight" of Acid Christ: Ken Kesey, LSD, and the Politics of Ecstasy by Mark Christensen, courtesy of Schaffner Press. A Christ figure who quit his day job as the new Norman Mailer to deliver millennial baby boomers the psychedelic New Jerusalem, Ken Kesey’s super hero career began with the biggest bang ever.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Featuring interviews with those within his inner circle, this exploration reveals the bestselling author of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in his many forms, placing him within the framework of his time, his generation, and the zeitgeist of the psychedelic era.

From the literary wonder boy to the countercultural guru whose cross-country bus trip inspired The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, this candid biography chronicles the life and times of cultural icon Ken Kesey from the 1960s through the 1980s

From the literary wonder boy to the countercultural guru whose cross-country bus trip inspired The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, this candid biography chronicles the life and times of cultural icon Ken Kesey from the 1960s through the 1980s.

From the literary wonder boy to the countercultural guru whose cross-country bus trip inspired The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, this candid biography chronicles the life and times of cultural icon Ken Kesey from the 1960s through the 1980s. Presenting an incisive analysis of the author who described himself as "too young to be a beatnik, and too old to be a hippie," this account conducts a mesmerizing journey from the perspective of Mark Christensen, an eventual member of the Kesey "flock." Featuring interviews with those within his inner circle, this exploration reveals the bestselling author of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest in his many forms, placing him within the framework of his time, his generation, and the zeitgeist of the psychedelic era.

Comments: (7)
Puchock
It's not often that someone tweaks the classic format of biography and comes up with a new way to tell the story of someone's life, but Mark Christensen did it, with stunning results. His hybridization of memoir/bio, which was pathologized by some Nurse Ratched, Freud-obsessed reader-reviewers as a function of egotism, was exactly the kind of fresh approach Ken Kesey would have approved of. I lived in Eugene for a long time and found that there were too many people who canonized Kesey as -- it's not hyperbole -- an actual acid christ, and they were innately intolerant of anything that colored outside the lines of their liturgy. Their loss. Not mine, nor Christensen's. Kesey was a brilliant, flawed character who deserves the 360-degree view that Christensen delivered. Not incidentally, in this work and others, Christensen offers some of the best imagery since Fitzgerald: The eye sees scenes more vividly than any straightforward narrative could ever provide. Trust the reviews by Palahniuk and the other pros, and let the detractors stew in their own associated egomania.
GoodLike
A GREAT READ AT A GREAT PRICE !A+ Vendor
thrust
I was looking forward to reading this book, although I suppose that I should have been forewarned by the grandiose title. I am sure that there is much interesting material within it, but I found the author's writing style to be very tiring to read. NOTE: I just wrote the following: I suggest that any potential buyer really make use of the "search within" function and see for themselves. Then I checked to see and found that this function is not offered on this book. Unfortunate for readers, although likely advantageous for the author and publisher.
Urtte
Reading "Acid Christ" I learned more about Mark Christensen than I ever cared to know.If you're looking for a good solid biography of Ken Kesey,as I was,this is not your book.The book is more of a self-memoir than it is a biography and Mr. Kesey is a backdrop for Christensen to tell his own story. It's also pretty badly written.Hopefully,someday,something better than this will come out as Ken Kesey is one of the few seminal figures of the 1960's who doesn't have a definative biography written about them.
Ka
Acid Christ: Ken Kesey, LSD, and The Politics of Ecstasy: how can we resist? Mark Christensen takes some of the most interesting cultural historical subject matter of the last fifty years and proceeds to turn it into a fractured, inchoate, non narrative which is extremely challenging to read. He tells his own story of the times along side Kesey's, and at greater length. Frankly, who cares about his rich kid stoner tale. We want to read about Kesey; that's the name in the title and why we bought the book. As Christensen explains: "Unlike a conventional biography which keeps its subject at arm's length and attempts at every level to be fair and balanced, a "participatory biography" would be the tale of how a major modern cultural figure, in this case Ken Kesey, effected [sic] the life of the author personally and subjectively." Really, both personally and subjectively? Christensen apparently has written journalism for Rolling Stone and High Times, and his prose style confirms that biographical information. He cares little for literary conventions such as complete sentences and common syntax. He is also fond of hyperbole and loves to take ridiculous leaps of time in single sentences rendering them meaningless if not quite impossible to follow. This short, bizarre paragraph is not as uncommon an example of Christensen's loopy attempts to synthesize historically significant events as the reader might hope: "The Revolution had yet to run into herpes, AIDS, and Hunter Thompson and - take a toke and think about it: Wouldn't the moon be mellower if Cream ran NASA? Launched by our fathers, we were about to conquer, if not the heavens, heaven's cold cousin outer space." Did you take that toke? Christensen's editor at Schaffner, I fear, took a few too many.
Despite the burdens of Christensen's organizational and prose styles, his insights into Kesey and the era are both interesting and valuable. Turns out Kesey was a control freak and struggled with his ego as much as Ernest Hemingway and Norman Mailer. Christensen understands where Kesey fits into post war American literature and he writes with a light touch about literary issues. Most importantly, I don't know of another book featuring so much information about Kesey, though there are significant gaps in Kesey's life that a conventional biography certainly would have filled. For example, Christensen tells us early in the book that Kesey and his wife Faye's marriage was an open one, and that the both of them were pioneers in this lifestyle, but the subject of Kesey's other lovers is not mentioned again, and there is almost nothing about Faye Kesey at all in the book, not a hint at her participation or her reactions to the fascinating events which befell her celebrated husband. It's common knowledge from other sources that Kesey fathered a child with the Merry Prankster, Mountain Girl, famous for her long marriage, including two children, to Jerry Garcia. There is no mention of this significant connection and there is little of mention of Mountain Girl at all despite many references to Garcia and his significant role in Kesey's life. Now, it's entirely possible that Christensen is too close to many of these people to dig into areas they would prefer he left alone, but if that is the explanation for the numerous glaring omissions in the narrative, then his proximity to his subject's milieu has seriously handicapped his work. True or not, it's inexcusable in a book which pretends to be a historical record. He isn't a bit shy revealing gossipy details about the numerous tangential celebrities who show up in his personal tale or details of his personal intimate relationships and excesses; but once again, who cares about Christensen's story mashed into what appears from the title to be a Ken Kesey historical biography. Christensen talks at length about the alternative lifestyles in his own and Kesey's home state of Oregon, and he tries at length to sum up Kesey's historical legacy, yet there is not a single mention of The Oregon Country Fair, certainly Oregon's hippie culture's most enduring institution. I could go on and on, but you get the point. Read Acid Christ if you must, but do not let it shape your view of Kesey and his historical era. For a more complete and readable history, I suggest Martin Lee & Bruce Shlain's Acid Deams:The Complete Social History of LSD, the CIA, the Sixties and Beyond.