carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Meyebela: My Bengali Girlhood

eBook Meyebela: My Bengali Girlhood download

by Gopa Majumdar,Taslima Nasrin

eBook Meyebela: My Bengali Girlhood download ISBN: 1586420518
Author: Gopa Majumdar,Taslima Nasrin
Publisher: Steerforth; First Edition edition (June 1, 1998)
Language: English
Pages: 300
ePub: 1459 kb
Fb2: 1582 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: lit lrf doc lrf
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Arts and Literature

Meyebela: My Bengali Girlhood.

Start by marking Meyebela: My Bengali Girlhood as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Meyebela: My Bengali Girlhood. Taslima Nasrin's Autobiography by. Taslima Nasrin, Gopa Majumdar (Translator).

Meyebela: My Bengali Girlhood. 236 Pages · 1998 · . 4 MB · 278 Downloads ·English. This being human is a guest house. Every morning is a new arrival.

Meyebela, My Bengali Girlhood is a 1998 autobiographical book by Bangladeshi doctor, turned feminist writer Taslima Nasrin. This autobiographical book tells Nasrin's story from birth to adolescence. The Bengali term Meyebela means "girlhood". The book has been banned in Bangladesh because "its contents might hurt the existing social system and religious sentiments of the people.

International Standard Book Number (ISBN): 1586420518 (alk. paper) :, . 0. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Meyebela : my Bengali girlhood, Taslima Nasrin ; translated by Gopa Majumdar. System Control Number: (Sirsi) 9307453. System Control Number: 9307453.

Taslima Nasrin revisits her early years from her auspicious birth on a. . Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus.

Taslima Nasrin revisits her early years from her auspicious birth on a Muslim holy day to the threshold of womanhood at fourteen in a small rural village during the years East Pakistan became Bangladesh. Set against the background of the fight for independence, Nasrin's earliest memories alternate between scenes of violence and flight and images of innocent pleasures of childhood in her extended family. This groundbreaking book throws open a window on a world unknown to most Westerners.

Город: EverywhereПодписчиков: 322 ты. себе: Author, Secular Humanist, Feminist, Phys. себе: Author, Secular Humanist, Feminist, Physician

by Taslima Nasrin & translated by Gopa Majumdar

by Taslima Nasrin & translated by Gopa Majumdar. The writing is personal and understandably angry, although this is its weakness, since Nasrin seems to imply-without giving any wider context for readers to judge by-that the horrors she details are universal: her sexual abuse by two uncles when she was five and seven; beatings by her father; her mother’s increasingly erratic behavior; and the arranged marriages of talented school.

Pdf Bangla Book Dharma Nei, Opekkha Royeche Taslima Nasrin. Download or read Bengali pdf books online. Pdf Bangla Book Bondini By Taslima Nasrin. Dharma Nei, Opekkha Royeche is a very nice. Taslima Nasrin Article. Bondini is a storybook by Taslima Nasrin Taslima Nasrin Story Books. Saree Blouse By Taslima Nasrin. Pdf Bangla Book Saree Blouse By Taslima Nasrin. Saree Blouse is a storybook by Taslima. Taslima Nasrin Story Books. Kichukkhon Thako By Taslima Nasrin.

Meyebela : My Bengali Girlhood. Taslima Nasrin revisits her early years - from her auspicious birth on a Muslim holy day to the threshold of womanhood at fourteen - in a small rural village during the years East Pakistan became Bangladesh

Meyebela : My Bengali Girlhood. Book in the Taslima Nasrin's Autobiography Series). Taslima Nasrin revisits her early years - from her auspicious birth on a Muslim holy day to the threshold of womanhood at fourteen - in a small rural village during the years East Pakistan became Bangladesh.

This groundbreaking book throws open a window on a world unknown to most Westerners. Taslima Nasrin revisits her early years — from her auspicious birth on a Muslim holy day to the threshold of womanhood at fourteen — in a small rural village during the years East Pakistan became Bangladesh. Set against the background of the fight for independence, Nasrin’s earliest memories alternate between scenes of violence and flight and images of innocent pleasures of childhood in her extended family.A precocious child, Nasrin’s acute awareness of the injustice and suffering endured by her mother and other Muslim women cause her to turn from the Koran in early adolescence, and to begin a journey to redefine her world. Her growing awareness of the class discriminations, gender disparities, and growing religious orthodoxy and intolerance in her family and her rural village parallel the broader social and cultural upheaval emerging in the new nation, and foreshadow the growth of a feminist dissident courageous enough to defy the fundamentalist Muslim clerics.“Nasrin’s voice is the voice of humanism everywhere.”-- Wole Soyinka“I am sure you have become tired of being called ‘the female Salman Rushdie’ . . . but please know that there are many people in many countries working to . . . defend you against those who would cheerfully see you dead. . . . In the West, there are too many eloquent apologists working to convince people of the fiction that women are not discriminated against in Muslim countries or that, if they are, it has nothing to do with religion.”-- Excerpt from an open letter from Salman Rrushdie to Taslima Nasrin
Comments: (6)
Little Devil
Eye opening experience for those who don't know much about being Bengali and a woman around a turbulent time in the country's history.
Grillador
This book is really beautifully written and so unique. I loved the combination of history and personal story. It is a great way to also learn more about Bangladeshi history.
Usanner
I usually enjoy reading books by women writers from the Indian subcontinent. This was one book that could not hold my attention - badly written, repetitive, and unnecessarily lengthy: a tedious read. Ms. Nasrin sounds like a manipulative child - she knows what the West wants to hear and makes too much of an effort to please.
Alexandra
Taslima Nasrin�s is a strong competent voice from Bangladesh. She has been in exile ever since her controversial book "Lajja" or "Shame" about Muslim persecution of Hindus in Bangladesh caused a fatwa to be issued against her. Meyebela, My Bengali Girlhood: A Memoir of Growing up Female in a Muslim World is Nasrin�s heart-wrenching account of a desperate childhood in Mymensingh, a relatively small town in Bangladesh.
In this memoir (one of two volumes), Nasrin openly questions her religion, Islam, and its discrimination against women. Her sad and depressing childhood was an unfortunate byproduct of a unique combination of cruel elements, one of which was a repressive society where "I was simply supposed to accept�without asking questions�whatever the grownups decided to bestow on me, be it punishment or reward." Taslima was treated like a second-class citizen all throughout and horrifically abused by her uncles. Add to these, Nasrin had very unstable parents�a mother who was driven to religious extremism by a philandering father and a father who was extremely harsh yet very insistent on education. Having had his first two sons fail his "expectations", he pinned all his hopes on young Taslima and her sister, Yasmin. The girls were denied all social interaction (Nasrin�s father had high walls built around the house so the girls could not look beyond it and get distracted) and the books were made to be their only focus.
Nasrin�s memoir, which is set against the Bangladesh war for independence, makes some very important points about religion and a girl�s role in an oppressive society. Like a flood of memories though, her memoir seems to shift out of focus occasionally. Towards the end, parts of her statements get to be repetitive.
Taslima Nasrin did become a doctor and lived up to her father�s expectations. In that sense, he "won". But eventually Nasrin did manage to find her own voice-- one that continues to speak powerfully on behalf of oppressed women all over the world.
Nasrin in her memoir tells us what life truly is like for many girls around the world. It is our duty to listen. It is sad though that we can often do little more than be outraged.
Nikobar
I read the book on a recent business trip and found it beautifully written. It maybe just one instance of a female muslim childhood, but as long as it is truthfully told, there should not be any objections. THe narrative voice is clear and poetic. The characters in this book come across as vivid and complex. Even though some very painful and ugly incidents are described, the book does not try to shock. Rather, there is a sense of humanity and love in the way the stories are relayed...
CrazyDemon
I'll be brief since one reviewer elucidated my points quite well.
There's no doubt that Taslima Nasrin will go down in history was one of the greatest writers the south Asian community has even produced. She has clear vision on contemporary issues within the south Asian world. Her recent novel is of course a "magnum Opus"that will be remembered by many. My only contention is that she tends to have a rather fervid tendency to over-generalize excessively. At times her statements about Islam in the book contradict her statements in speeches and other prints. Her critique of religion regurgitates old-fashioned arguments that stymies the reader( at least this reviewer). A good biography indeed. However, don't use it as a critique or religion.