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eBook Kerouac: Selected Letters: Volume 2: 1957-1969 download

by Jack Kerouac

eBook Kerouac: Selected Letters: Volume 2: 1957-1969 download ISBN: 0140296158
Author: Jack Kerouac
Publisher: Penguin Books (November 1, 2000)
Language: English
Pages: 608
ePub: 1479 kb
Fb2: 1587 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lrf mobi doc txt
Category: Biography
Subcategory: Arts and Literature

The first volume of Jack Kerouac's selected letters, published in 1995, was hailed as an important and revealing addition to. .Only 2 left in stock (more on the way)

The first volume of Jack Kerouac's selected letters, published in 1995, was hailed as an important and revealing addition to Kerouac scholarship. This second and final volume. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by glaevebooks.

Selected Letters, 1957-1969 book. When Viking published the first volume of Jack Kerouac's letters in 1995, it was considered a major addition to Kerouac scholarship

Selected Letters, 1957-1969 book. When Viking published the first volume of Jack Kerouac's letters in 1995, it was considered a major addition to Kerouac scholarship. The early correspondence portended the uninhibited and spontaneous prose style that would later become the author's trademark.

Just a year before he died, the writer fired off a letter, now being auctioned, to his literary agent pitching his plans for a final book, titled Spotlight. A late-life letter from Jack Kerouac will be featured in an upcoming auction from Boston-based RR Auction Continue reading. Jack Kerouac: Selected Letters, 1957-1969.

This second and final volume, comprising letters written between.

Selected letters, 1957-1969. by. Kerouac, Jack, 1922-1969. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Oliver Wendell Holmes Library.

her first volume contributed to a new understanding of Kerouac and his work: this volume also includes the same attention to notes and detail, furthering her goal of presenting his life via his writings. com User, January 7, 2000. I knew that Jack had his problems later in his life but this book really shows that he got off track in the late 50's rather than the 60's

Jack Kerouac (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist and poet. He is considered a literary iconoclast and, alongside William S. Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, a pioneer of the Beat Generation. Kerouac is recognized for his method.

Jack Kerouac (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist and poet. Kerouac is recognized for his method of spontaneous prose. Thematically, his work covers topics such as Catholic spirituality, jazz, promiscuity, Buddhism, drugs, poverty, and travel. The Sea Is My Brother (written 1942; published 2011). The Town and the City (written 1946–1949; published 1950).

Jack Kerouac, Ann Charters. The first volume of Jack Kerouac's selected letters, published in 1995, was hailed as an important and revealing addition to Kerouac scholarship.

Jack Kerouac(1922-1969), the central figure of the Beat Generation, was born in Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1922 and died in St. Petersburg, Florida, in 1969. Among his many novels are On the Road, The Dharma Bums, Big Sur, and Visions of Cody. She teaches at the University of Connecticut.

The first volume of Jack Kerouac's selected letters, published in 1995, was hailed as an important and revealing addition to Kerouac scholarship. This second and final volume, comprising letters written between 1957, the year On the Road was published, and the day before his death in 1969 at age forty-seven, tells Kerouac's life story through his candid correspondence with friends, confidants, and editors—among them Allen Ginsberg, William Burroughs, Philip Whalen, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Joyce Johnson, and Malcolm Cowley. Documenting his continuing development as a writer and his travels, love affairs, and complicated family life, the letters also reveal Kerouac's amazing courage in the force of criticism and his never-ending quest to be the best writer possible.

Jack Kerouac Selected Letters 1957-1969 offers unparalleled insight into the life and mind of this giant of the American landscape.

Comments: (5)
Voodoosida
Your copy was too good to be true but there you have it. Maybe I got lucky is all. Thanks anyway though. You are totally reliable.
Fohuginn
It was always an annoyance to Jack that he wasn't considered one of America's "major" writers and hopefully the belated interest in the last years have done much to put that to rest. Kerouac was not only On the Road and the Dharma Bums. He wrote many wonderful novels... And some of his poetry, especially his haikus, I personally feel were top notch, little Emily Dickinson (as he himself would put it) gems. But what a sad, funny book this is! Boy, has any writer's decline ever been so well documented by himself? Jack certainly was a mess in the end, and I'm sure even he appreciated the Celine-like quality of his descent. "I'm fat, dejected, ashamed, bored, pestered and shot." -Dec. 1959. "Now look at me, I big [yes, I big] happy international wreck." -Dec. 1961. But fiesty: "I'm an artist, old-fashioned, devoted." -March 1957. But, Lord how sad! "And the months roll by, and turn into years..." -Jan. 1962. If anyone has ever been to Lowell, I feel you can appreciate the works even better. To think that Jack spent his latter years in a split-level home on a suburban street is in itself fantastically weird! The ricochetting back and forth between Florida and the Northeast becomes a maddening yearly migration. But what other major writer ever got a kick out of ordering the Encyclopedia Britannica? And actually sitting around and reading it? Out in the fenced-in, well-shaded yard? Sipping boilermakers? "I like it, I like it, I tell you I like it Literature." -Dec. 1965.
Hamrl
For any biographer or historian the original letters of the subject is a valuable and extremely important source of information in order to gain insight into the time period, and/or the person under study.

In part 2 of Kerouac's Selected Letters, the text truly gives the student or curious, a penetrating look into this enigmatic and ultimately tragic American author. For many, Jack Krerouac represents an important shift in American literature but also a significant historical (literary) mark of an entire generation. Ann Charters, (Kerouac's first biographer) editor of this volume, has done a pain-staking and beautiful job with this book - we come to know him as a man, the artist and his concerns; generosity, relationships; his struggle with the demon drink and, most importantly, the development of his unique prose style, leading to his now iconic status.

The letters begin in the year (1957) when "On the Road" was published. At this stage of Kerouac's life, from the tone and content of his letters, he is excited, finishing incomplete manuscripts, organizing "get- togethers', writing his publisher and working on new projects. As the years progress, sadly, his drinking accelerates, he becomes more and more misanthropic and, in the end, paranoid. It is true - it was the booze that killed his body but it was fame as an author that murdered his soul. More than likely, it was both.

Ann Charters suggests that these letters were experiments in style and possible new ideas for future projects, his friends perhaps 'sounding boards' where the reader can see his development of what is famously known as "spontaneous prose".

Kerouac was also a prolific poet. Some call his "novel", Mexico City Blues, one long, epic poem. This particular book, for me, was difficult to read, until viewing the piece as poetry - it was then the penny dropped and the book became much easier to read.

An example of a little poem written for Stella Sampas to Gary Snyder from Japan:

"A poem to Stella Sampas?"

"After the shower,
Among the drenched roses,
The bird thrashing in the bath

After the shower,
my cat meowing
On the porch"

It has always been my opinion that Jack's poetry is underrated, but that's neither here nor there.

Kerouac wanted his letters to be published thus he kept copies in neat files by year.

Anyone interested in American literature, pursuing a research project or wanting greater insight into the man, these letters are an invaluble historical document revealing the inner workings of the "Beat Generation" that continues to affect most modern writing to present time.
Use_Death
First, the recommendation is to read the companion book, and predecessor, Selected Letters: 1940 - 1956, before starting this one. Both books are really two volumes of the same story.

Those familiar with Kerouac's writing will recognize the characters, scenes and events from the letters as the basis for his groundbreaking novels. Via his letters, you get the unvarnished versions of the later quasi-fictional accounts (and the legend aside, Kerouac's novels were quite polished in their own way - no syllable written by accident). However, these letters (and the excellent non-intrusive editing/comments by Ann Charters) serve as the best biography (auto-biography) written about Kerouac (and I've read them all). Perhaps no person in literature experienced as many self-inflicted highs and lows as Jack Kerouac. He could go from the highest peaks to the deepest vallies from one letter to the next.

In addition, the ceaseless restlessness that gripped him his entire life has never been documented any better, or with more frustrating clarity, than in these letters. One day, Kerouac thrills at the prospect of a cabin in the woods in utter isolation(to get away from the partying New York scene); the next day he has plans to live on a commune type ranch with all his friends - or move to Mexico, or Colorado or San Francisco or any number of addresses on Long Island or Florida. Many of these moves he actually followed through on only to find, in very short order, that his urge to wander had returned. At these times you notice Kerouac dropping lines to friends outlining why his new paradise has been destroyed and how perfect the next paradise is going to be.

Such was his self destructive path and, in reading these incredibly personal letters, one feels the end approaching as the America Kerouac immortalized dies a slow death, only to be reborn as an entity Kerouac is given partial credit for creating - a credit he had no interest in claiming. When all is said and done, however, the tragedy of Kerouac pales in comparison to his renowned love of life and his obsessive need to document the beauty (and ugliness) that surrounded him. These letters reflect a time when people - a great many people - got excited about poetry, literature, art and just being alive. A time before pseudo-intellectual-hip-irony made it impossible to get excited about anything. KEROUAC LIVES!