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eBook Queen of the Golden Age: The Fabulous Story of Grace Wilson Vanderbilt download

by Cornelius Vanderbilt

eBook Queen of the Golden Age: The Fabulous Story of Grace Wilson Vanderbilt download ISBN: 0704102951
Author: Cornelius Vanderbilt
Publisher: George Mann Books; New edition edition (April 1989)
Language: English
Pages: 288
ePub: 1978 kb
Fb2: 1815 kb
Rating: 4.3
Other formats: txt rtf lit mobi
Category: Biography

Rear cover notes: "Grace Wilson Vanderbilt occupied the very pinnacle of American High Society during the great golden age of the millionaires. She sees herself as a kind of perpetual fairytale,' her friend Teddy Roosevelt declared.

Rear cover notes: "Grace Wilson Vanderbilt occupied the very pinnacle of American High Society during the great golden age of the millionaires. For she moved in a glittering world, spending hundreds of thousands of dollars as naturally as she breathed and entertaining more lavishly than any Queen of England, with as many as thirty thousand guests in any one year. At her mansion, The Breakers, on Rhode Island, it was not uncommon to seat two hundred for dinner.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. I love everything Vanderbilt! This book was just excellent. I have read many of the stories before but I truly enjoyed reading this story written by Grace Vanderbilt's son Neil.

In addition to his newspaper work, he wrote a number of books, including a biography about his mother, Queen of the Gold Age, and his own memoirs, Personal Experiences of a Cub Reporter and Farewell to Fifth Avenue.

Vanderbilt and his wife Grace remained married until his death and had two children, Cornelius IV (1898–1974), who would marry seven times, and . Queen Of Golden Age: The Fabulous Story Of Grace Wilson Vanderbilt. New York: McGraw-Hill.

Vanderbilt and his wife Grace remained married until his death and had two children, Cornelius IV (1898–1974), who would marry seven times, and Grace (September 25, 1899 - January 28, 1964). Neily Vanderbilt was an inveterate tinkerer with all things mechanical and patented more than thirty inventions for improving locomotives and freight cars, including several which brought him a significant royalty income.

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Subject: "Here is not only an inside picture of an incredibly luxurious way of life but the complete and true story of the split in the Vanderbilt family and the notorious feud brought on by the marriage of (Cornelius and Grace). Author: Cornelius Vanderbilt, Jr. (her son) Publisher: McGraw Hill, 1956. 2nd printing Description: Hardback w/dj; 311 pp. Condition: GOOD: ffee missing, dj chipped and creased, shelf wear.

Cornelius Vanderbilt writes a valentine here to his mother, Grace Wilson Vanderbilt. Cornelius's father was all but disowned by his parents for marrying the purportedly notorious Grace, herself from a rich and prominent family. This year's top sellers.

the fabulous story of Grace Wilson Vanderbilt. by Vanderbilt, Cornelius. Published 1956 by McGraw-Hill in New York. Grace Wilson Vanderbilt (1870-1953). V235 V3. The Physical Object. 311 p. Number of pages.

Grace Vanderbilt died on January 7, 1953.

Grace Vanderbilt died on January 7, 1953 Ancestry. Family of Cornelius Vanderbilt III. 16. Cornelius van Derbilt. 8. Cornelius Vanderbilt. 4. William Henry Vanderbilt. 18. Nathaniel Johnson.

Comments: (2)
Ndyardin
This is an interesting book for those who desire an inside look at what life was like for America's robber barons and their immediate families during the Gilded Age. Cornelius Vanderbilt writes a valentine here to his mother, Grace Wilson Vanderbilt.
Cornelius's father was all but disowned by his parents for marrying the purportedly notorious Grace, herself from a rich and prominent family. Nonetheless, he made as much money as any other member of his estranged family, despite being cast out on his own, and he raised his children as the closest thing to royalty that this country ever will know.
Accordingly, Cornelius and his siblings were given childhoods filled with yachts and mansions in Newport and on Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, along with a lavishly bejeweled mother who entertained magnificently. The author himself was largely disowned by his father when he chose a career as a newspaper reporter. Still, his own professional experience probably makes him a more objective diarist than a conventional loving son might be. The details that he provides are fascinating, and these certainly would be unknown to an unrelated researcher.
This is an interesting and worthwhile book for those intrigued by this unique period in American history.
OCARO
I have read this book several times and have gone back to it as a source when writing. At first I felt that C.V., Jr's biography was a good, objective view of his mother's life and her place in social history. Unfortunately, as I have read and researched more, I have discovered that Grace was seen as less spectacular by others - especially those European individuals that her son would have us believe are her intimate friends.

Short of a minor mention in one biography of King Edward VII, Grace Vanderbilt seems not to have moved in the royal circles to the degree we are lead to believe... and the encounters she does have were viewed with something akin to scorn. The Princess Daisy of Pless, who lived at the very top of Edwardian Society, mentions Grace in her biography, but only in passing. She calls her a "snobbish little American." So it would appear that "the queen of the golden age" is more a legend in her son's mind, than in the rest of the world's.