carnevalemanfredonia.it
» » Virginia Woolf

eBook Virginia Woolf download

by Nigel Nicolson

eBook Virginia Woolf download ISBN: 0753811472
Author: Nigel Nicolson
Publisher: Orion Pub Co (June 2001)
Language: English
Pages: 240
ePub: 1847 kb
Fb2: 1847 kb
Rating: 4.2
Other formats: lit azw txt rtf
Category: Biography

During his childhood Virginia Woolf was a frequent visitor to the Nicolson family home, and it is Nigel Nicolson’s reminiscences of these childhood encounters that make this such a little gem.

Virginia Woolf's life as part of the avant-garde Bloomsbury Group has captured the .

Virginia Woolf's life as part of the avant-garde Bloomsbury Group has captured the imagination of millions. In this "Penguin Life" Nigel Nicolson provides a balanced, affectionate and eloquent introduction to the life of Virginia Woolf. Nicolson provides us with the major events, the major players, the family background, and Bloomsbury. Nicolson's having known and liked Virginia Woolf adds a personal touch without compromising objectivity.

Nicolson wrote many books.

OBE. Member of Parliament for Bournemouth East and Christchurch. Nicolson wrote many books. He and George Weidenfeld co-founded the publishing house Weidenfeld & Nicolson, of which he was a director from 1948 to 1992. He also worked as a broadcaster and was a member of the Ancient Monuments Board. Later he wrote the "Long Life" column for The Spectator, and a Time of My Life column for The Sunday Telegraph

Virginia Woolf was born in London, the daughter of the prominent literary critic Leslie Stephen. She never received a formal university education; her early education was obtained at home through her parents and governesses.

Virginia Woolf was born in London, the daughter of the prominent literary critic Leslie Stephen. After death of her father in 1904, her family moved to Bloomsbury, where they formed the nucleus of the Bloomsbury Group, a circle of philosophers, writers and artists.

Virginia Woolf’s life as part of the avant-garde Bloomsbury Group has captured the imagination of millions

Virginia Woolf’s life as part of the avant-garde Bloomsbury Group has captured the imagination of millions. Now Nigel Nicolson, the distinguished son of British writers Harold Nicolson and Vita Sackville-West (Vita was one of Woolf’s closest and most intimate friends) threads his personal reminiscences through the narrative of her life. In so doing, he paints an astonishing portrait of one of the most remarkable women in history

During his childhood Virginia Woolf was a frequent visitor to the Nicolson family home, and it is Nigel Nicolson’s reminiscences of these childhood encounters that make this such a little gem.

There were however things I certainly hadn’t remembered about this book, and which if I am honest I think makes it a slightly weaker work than I had remembered. Nicolson is very dismissive about Virginia Woolf’s feminism. His view of her famous A Room of One’s Own was that VW was referring only to the women of her own class (well yes possibly) – and.

An intimate, surprising portrait of the great American writer peels back the layers of Woolf's life to reveal a writer passionately interested in women's issues, human rights, the nature of war, and other important issues. 25,000 first printing.

Bibliographic Details. Title: THE LETTERS OF VIRGINIA WOOLF  . Title: THE LETTERS OF VIRGINIA WOOLF Publisher: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York. Visit Seller's Storefront. Now Nigel Nicolson, the distinguished son of British writers Harold Nicolson and Vita Sackville-West - one of Woolf's closest friends and sometime lover - threads his personal reminiscences through the narrative of her life. Virginia Woolf's life as part of the avant-garde Bloomsbury Group has captured the imagination of millions.

Virginia Woolf was undoubtedly one of the literary giants of the twentieth century. She was a central figure in the Bloomsbury Group, and her writings were works of astonishing originality. Nigel Nicolson is the son of Vita Sackville-West, who was Virginia Woolf's most intimate friend, and for a short time her lover. He spent many days in her company and he has threaded his recollections of her throughout this unique narrative of her life. 'As a short introduction to Virginia Woolf this deceptively brief book could hardly be bettered and achieves high status instantly as a significant work of reference in its own right' The Times
Comments: (7)
from earth
In this "Penguin Life" Nigel Nicolson provides a balanced, affectionate and eloquent introduction to the life of Virginia Woolf. Nicolson provides us with the major events, the major players, the family background, and Bloomsbury. He also introduces the reader to some of the controversies (e.g., the extent and effect of her sexual abuse by her half-brothers.) The picture that emerges is one of a brilliant and complex woman -- difficult, loving, deeply insightful, wrong-headed, sympathetic, prickly, loyal, jealous, witty, snobbish, and liberal.
Nicholson is an editor of Woolf's letters and the son of Vita Sackville-West, with whom Virginia Woolf had an affair. Nicolson's having known and liked Virginia Woolf adds a personal touch without compromising objectivity.
Mojar
This is really a great book, written with such love from a man who truly knew Ms Woolf.
If you want to know about Ms Woolf I highly recommend this book.
VizoRRR
When this little biography came out as part of the Penguin Lives series at the turn of the millennium, it caused some real joy among Virginia Woolf scholars and aficionados. The author, Nigel Nicolson (then in his eighties), not only had worked with her writing for decades, as the co-editor of her letters, but was one of the last living people who knew her well during her lifetime. His mother, Vita Sackville-West, was one of the great loves of Virginia Woolf's lives, and Nigel Nicolson had grown up with his mother's great friend visiting their ancient estates of Long Barn and Sissinghurst Castle, playing with him and his brother Ben and (among other things) helping them collect butterflies (an anecdote that begins this book). This short work is half-memoir, half-biography. As a brief life, it offers little more than a sketch of Woolf's life (that is more thoroughly outlined in multiple works, including most famously Hermione Lee's standard biography), but it also offers so much new and unexpected for Woolf students that it's an essential work in the critical bibliography.

Moreover, it is really beautifully written. Nicolson worked with publishing all his life, and was one of the founders of the firm Weidenfeld & Nicolson; he wrote a lovely portrait of his flawed parents in PORTRAIT OF A MARRIAGE, and this funny little book (which incidentally offers revealing information about his mother) was a nice capstone to his full literary career, offering a dual portrait of the two female great writers he loved most in his life. Its unusual angles (delving into Woolf's sexuality, her xenophobia, her snobbishness, and her great gift for conversation) make it perennially interesting, and at the time it did important work rehabilitating Woolf's husband Leonard after his reputation had suffered somewhat among Woolf scholars in the Eighties and Nineties.
Tat
I read this mainly to gain a little more insight into Virginia Woolf-the-person because of an essay I was writing on "To the Lighthouse." It didn't really provide me with the biographical detail or psychological penetration I was craving - but then, I doubt that was Nicolson's intent. Instead he offers a curiously airy yet affectionate series of character sketches, a handful of priceless anecdotes and some incidental musings, all of which amounts to an entertaining reflection on Woolf's life and personality but actually makes her more mysterious and unknowable in certain ways. It's memoir vs biography, I guess; Nicolson tends to regard Woolf from the point of view of a bemused bystander, fond of her but not overly engaged with her - but at the same time, he feels no need to make much sense of her suicide, for instance. He just dips in and out of what interests him, not striving for deeper meaning or cogency when it does not suit him, and this makes it a dissatisfying book for someone not already well acquainted with Woolf's biography.
That said, this is an enjoyable read. Nicolson is supremely English, in quite a charming way - his prose is coolly elegant with an occasional flash of wit or moment of restrained warmth, and he never declares anything outright, just insinuates or suggests (not unlike Woolf herself). His attitude to his subject is both touchingly and infuriatingly respectful. I think he was so terrified of being scurrilous, of exploiting his position as Vita Sackville-West's son, that this book comes off as over-polite, over-careful; he whets our interest but refuses to supply the goods. It's a pity, because he really does have an unique perspective.
Still, I reccommend it. It's a quick read, and a nice way to spend an afternoon.
Yllk
VIRGINIA WOOLF by Nigel Nicolson departs from the template used by the Penguin Lives series so far as I've read down the list. It cannot claim that its subject exists in obscurity behind clouds of legend or of lack of existing documentation. Woolf was a public person in her life time, she left not only a respectable body of work but an extensive collection of letters, essays and journals. She has been the subject of substantial, well received biographies and is also featured prominently in profiles of Bloomsbury, the Hogarth Press and biographies of her contemporaries. This volume is also distinguished from others in the Penguin Lives Series in that it was written by the son of Woolf's female lover, Vita Sackville-West; in other words, someone close to the inner circle. Woolf belongs to the visitable past. The book remains, however, a fine member of the Series because of its skill in purveying the whole through a spritely revisiting of the significant passages in Woolf's life. Nicholson writes with warmth and holds forth his opinions in controversial areas, but he is impressively objective given his relationship with his subject and those closest to her. Nicolson manages to capture all the ambiguities of the woman, makes them comprehensible, honest and, sparingly, poignant.