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eBook The reluctant admiral: Yamamoto and the Imperial Navy download

by Hiroyuki Agawa

eBook The reluctant admiral: Yamamoto and the Imperial Navy download ISBN: 0870113550
Author: Hiroyuki Agawa
Publisher: Kondasha International; 1st edition (1979)
Language: English
Pages: 397
ePub: 1561 kb
Fb2: 1642 kb
Rating: 4.4
Other formats: rtf doc lit lrf
Category: Biography

Tokyo ; New York : Kodansha International ; New York : Distributed in the . Translation of Yamamoto Isoroku.

Tokyo ; New York : Kodansha International ; New York : Distributed in the . through Harper & Row. Collection. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Agawa's biography of Yamamoto was originally published in Japan in 1969, and entitled "Yamamoto Isoroku. It is the English translation and abridgement of this earlier work that was first published in 1979, under the title, "The Reluctant Admiral. My attention was first drawn to The Reluctant Admiral by numerous bibliographical references in recent works, such as those by Spector, Lundstrom, Parshall and Tully, and Willmott. When multiple respected authors all cite a source this way, I take that as a tacit recommendation and place the item on my reading list.

In the front matter, there is a chronology of Yamamoto's life listing all major events and the year they occurred

In the front matter, there is a chronology of Yamamoto's life listing all major events and the year they occurred. There is no table of contents, as the chapters have no titles, only numbers.

Fine book in fine dust jacket. Great copy!This is the story of both an individual and an organization. The individual is Admiral Yamamoto, the architect of the Pearl Harbor raid and commander of the Combined Fleet until his dramatic death in the South Pacific. One of the best-known Japanese wartime leaders - 122229061926. The Reluctant Admiral: Yamamoto and the Imperial Navy Hiroyuki Agawa. Seller:kmbooks(4,441)99.

The Reluctant Admiral book. He entered the Tokyo Imperial University to study Japanese literature

The Reluctant Admiral book. He entered the Tokyo Imperial University to study Japanese literature. Upon graduation in 1942, Agawa was Hiroyuki Agawa (阿川 弘之 Agawa Hiroyuki?) is a Japanese author born on December 24, 1920, in Hiroshima, Japan. He is known for his fiction centered on World War II, as well as his biographies and essays. As a high school student Agawa was influenced by the Japanese author Naoya Shiga. Fascinating look, not only at the life of Yamamoto, but at the Imperial Navy during the leadup and first phase of the war in the Pacific. The writing style is somewhat quaint, with liberal amounts of dialogue and surprising attention to passing details like palm readers and quack alchemists.

From any point of view, the raid had been an outstanding success, and the staff officers could not conceal their jubilation; Yamamoto alone, apparently, remained sunk in apparent depression.

Upon graduation in 1942, Agawa was conscripted to serve in the Imperial Japanese Navy, where he worked as an intelligence officer breaking Chinese military codes . The Reluctant Admiral: Yamamoto and the Imperial Navy. ISBN 978-0-87011-355-0. ISBN 978-4-7700-2539-5.

Upon graduation in 1942, Agawa was conscripted to serve in the Imperial Japanese Navy, where he worked as an intelligence officer breaking Chinese military codes until the end of the war. He returned to Hiroshima, where his parents had experienced the atomic bomb, in March 1946. After World War II Agawa wrote his first short story Nennen Saisai (Years upon Years, 1946), which was a classic I Novel, or autobiographical novel, recounting the reunion with his parents. It follows the style of Naoya Shiga, who is said to have praised the work.

Hiroyuki Agawa was born in Hiroshima in 1920. He wrote about his experiences as a student soldier and his family's survival of the bombing of Hiroshima. His major works include "Kumo no bohyo" and "Gunkan Nagato no shogai. The NIPPON BONSAI ASSOCIATION is the single largest public bonsai organization in Japan. Initially begun as the Kokufu Bonsai Kai in 1934, the association has become increasingly active in bonsai circles over the years.

The individual is Admiral Yamamoto, the architect of the Pearl Harbor raid and commander of th. .An intimate portrait of the man who planned the attack on Pearl Harbor and died a dramatic death in the South Pacific. ISBN13: 9780870115127. Release Date: June 1982.

An intimate portrait of the man who planned the attack on Pearl Harbor and died a dramatic death in the South Pacific.
Comments: (7)
Nanecele
In this biography little information is provided prior to Yamamoto's rise to admiral. Nothing about his childhood, his education by foreign missionaries or his days in the Japanese Naval Academy (or the fact that he had the second highest score on the entrance examination in the entire nation). Nor is there much information about his early career as an ensign, naval attaché or service as captains of a cruiser and aircraft carrier. This is a shame as it is these early years that provided him with a world view of international politics, economics and military and naval affairs, particularly naval aviation, that so differentiated him rom so many of his contemporaries.

The book's biography starts, in earnest, after his rise to the rank of admiral. With this respect the book provides an excellent history, from his advancement over that rank, through his interaction with his military and political contemporaries through his attempts to, initially, prevent war with the U.S. to, finally and ironically, leading the naval aspect of that war against the U.S.

The book also provides a brief history of Yamamoto's role in the early part of the war (i.e. Pearl Harbor and Midway) but, unfortunately, little about most other early campaigns such as the Solomons or the Imperial Fleets rampage off the Indian coast. The reader gets very little feel for Yamamoto's strategy and style of command. This is especially disappointing considering the fact that Mr. Agawa, the author, was a naval officer in the Japanese Navy. For a short and succinct book on that aspect of Yamamoto this reviewer highly recommends a book written by an ex-US Navy Officer, Mr. Mark Stille, published by the Osprey Press entitled "Yamamoto". That book is very short (about 60 pages, about a third of which consists of illustration) but provides an excellent introduction to Yamamoto's style of command, in terms of both strengths and weaknesses, as well as a military biography that helps the reader understand the underlying causes of these strengths and weaknesses.

Mr. Agawa's book concludes with a very good and detailed narrative of the events leading to Yamamoto's death, from the U.S. code breaking that lead the U.S. to know about his visit to the front lines, the fighter attack leading to his death and the search for his plane.

One last point that needs to be made about the book involves the translation. In general it is quite good albeit there are quite a few terms and words that are left in the Japanese but not translated to English. To give the translator credit, however, all of these words and terms are very difficult to translate from Japanese to English.

All and all this book is a very good biography of Yamamoto even with the weaknesses mentioned above.
Eayaroler
Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto strove to grasp victory for the japanese empire in WW11. Yet even as he labored to defeat the United States and the United Kingdom, in his heart he knew the victory was beyond japanese grasp. He succeeded at Pearl Harbor, and for the first monts of the pacific war. But the defeat at Midway, destroyed his early string of victories. At Guadalcanal, he again faced defeat, after that struggle, the momentum belonged clearly to the allies. He died in an ambush, that was brought on by our codebreakers. He died a samuri's death, which in japanese culture of that era, was to desired. JRV
Mamuro
This a great book, well written and I feel gives a reader a honest this man. It, in my opinion, should make people realize, Admiral Yamamoto was not in favor of a war with the United States, the book makes it clear. He followed orders as any Military man swears an oath to do. One point clearly made by this book, The Admiral knew Japan had about six months to defeat the United States or our industrial might would spell the end for Japan, which it did.
Usaxma
This is a biography of Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, Commander in Chief of the Japanese Combined Fleet from 1939-1943. It is written by Hiroyuki Agawa, an author of biographies and historical fiction centered upon the Japanese experience in WW2. Agawa's biography of Yamamoto was originally published in Japan in 1969, and entitled "Yamamoto Isoroku." It is the English translation and abridgement of this earlier work that was first published in 1979, under the title, "The Reluctant Admiral."

My attention was first drawn to The Reluctant Admiral by numerous bibliographical references in recent works, such as those by Spector, Lundstrom, Parshall and Tully, and Willmott. When multiple respected authors all cite a source this way, I take that as a tacit recommendation and place the item on my reading list. The Reluctant Admiral may not be the only biography available on Yamamoto, but it is certainly the one most commonly referenced by other authors.

In the front matter, there is a chronology of Yamamoto's life listing all major events and the year they occurred. There is no table of contents, as the chapters have no titles, only numbers. There are no footnotes, nor even a bibliography. Agawa often, but not always, states the source of a passage in the text itself. To most English readers this is probably sufficient, given that almost all Agawa's sources would be Japanese language. There are no maps.

There is scant coverage of Yamamoto's early life, but extensive coverage, of course, of his naval career. Highlights touched upon include: the Battle of Tsushima (where Yamamoto was wounded), his two stints in the United States, participation in the treaty talks in London, and time as second in command of the Kasumigaura Aviation Corps, where he learned to appreciate the growing importance of aviation and the corresponding diminution of the importance of battleships. In his last assignment before being made Commander in Chief of the Combined Fleet, he served as Navy Vice-minister, where his life was in danger from ultra-nationalist radicals. Once promoted to C. in C., the slide toward war with the U.S. was precipitous, and Agawa demonstrates that although Yamamoto fully understood the peril and likely result of such a war, the admiral nevertheless resolved to give Japan their best chance in a near impossible situation.

Agawa offers no incisive look at Yamamoto's admiralship or strategic acumen. The resulting biography is mostly a human portrait, with emphasis on relationships and personality. The important historical events chronicled in the book seem simply to be the context for showcasing Yamamoto the man. This is a sharp contrast to many military biographies, where analysis of operations and strategy are emphasized, to the detriment of gaining a good understanding of the man himself.